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 Post subject: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Mon 09, 2017 1:34 am 
New Member

Joined: Jan Sat 07, 2017 9:45 pm
Posts: 11
Location: St. Louis MO
Heya All,
I've had an interest in these old radio's for a long time. I recently purchased a sad case to bring back to life. My main questions are, what are some good books to get to help with reviving this gem? I have experience with using a voltmeter, used to work on cars, back when you needed a timing light. The radio I have is Standardyne, I'm unsure if it's a Model 'B', 'B-5' or if late or early. Where may I purchase the correct schematics for this kid?
Thank you all for your help and I'm looking forward to being a part of the community here.

Tim


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Mon 09, 2017 4:55 am 
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Posts: 313
Location: Colorado Springs, CO
Welcome to the forum.

A good place to start for schematics is Nostalgia Air

http://www.nostalgiaair.org/Resources/

Also, the resources and archive tabs at the forum have lots of good info. Other members will have lots of good tips to add.

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Mon 09, 2017 5:08 am 
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Joined: Dec Wed 25, 2013 7:57 am
Posts: 1192
Location: USA
Welcome.

Learning how to do this depends on your personal style and experience with working on other things, like your car. To get a quick start, browse through Phil's beginner's pages to get an idea on what you might be doing.

https://antiqueradio.org/begin.htm

As far as books go:
check this tread: http://www.antiqueradios.com/forums/vie ... p?t=146723
Fixing up Nice Old Radios (Ed Romney) -- my local library located a copy via interlibrary loan. Also available via Amazon

I use Elements of Radio Servicing (Marcus & Levy) as reference when I need more details on specific topics:
http://antiqueradios.com/archive.shtml (pdf format)

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Mon 09, 2017 5:40 am 
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Joined: Jan Tue 31, 2012 1:55 am
Posts: 1517
Location: Mountains of Mourne. Ireland.
The google search function within this site (arf) is pretty good.

Here are a few hits for Standardyne... well 85 to be precise... Lol

on the book front.
This went unsold last week and has been relisted.
Elements of RADIO by A.Marcus
eBay (Long Beach) item number:→ 152376514308

Welcome aboard Tim... :)
Greg.


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Mon 09, 2017 5:42 am 
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Joined: Jan Tue 31, 2012 2:17 am
Posts: 162
Location: Hamilton, ON, CA
Welcome to the forum. Looks like you picked a real challenge as a starter. Sorry I don't have a book recommendation, not sure there are that many out there for restoring these early battery radios; I learned how by doing. As to a schematic, you likely won't find one for this radio available for purchase, so you may have to google around a bit to find something online if you're lucky. If you don't find one you will have to make your own schematic by physically tracing the circuit which isn't as bad as it might at first seem.

The radio looks like a common 5 tube type 01A set, very popular at the time it was built. These mostly used some form of the basic "Tuned Radio Frequency" (TRF) circuit: Three tuned circuits (with 3 dials on the panel), 2 RF tubes, 1 detector tube, 2 audio amplifier tubes. There are one or two filament control rheostats on the panel and an on/off switch. You will need an external speaker and a set of batteries, or a battery eliminator to provide the correct operating voltages if you want to use it when its restored. Plenty of elementary radio books will cover this type of circuit and its operation

Many problems can develop with these but to cover the basics, the first thing you will want to check is the continuity of the audio transformers, ie check to see that the windings are not open. You'll need a simple volt-ohm-milliameter (VOM) or multimeter to do this by checking the presence of any resistance of each of the transformer windings, ie primary and secondary. Often one or more of these will be open (infinite resistance, no continuity) on these early transformers which means you will need to either rewind it yourself, challenging if you're new to all of this, or buy a suitable replacement and adapt it, of which there are a couple of options available. Next you should verify the continuity of all the RF coils. These usually don't fail but sometimes you do find a broken wire at the solder lug.

Next, there might be a paper-wax-foil type capacitor or two to check and replace, and/or a cartridge resistor, ie grid leak resistor, which will need to be replaced if it has gone too far off value. You will want to check the filament controls for their continuity and operation, and of course you'll need to be sure all the 01As are good to use. Thats about it, the rest is all contact cleanup, checking for good wiring, ie no breaks or shorts to others.


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Mon 09, 2017 5:55 am 
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Location: Bettendorf, IA, USA
Its always a good idea to give your location, might be someone close by that would be willing to help you out.

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Mon 09, 2017 8:08 am 
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Joined: Dec Wed 25, 2013 7:57 am
Posts: 1192
Location: USA
just a bit to add. The Standardyne B5 is an earlier consumer set based on the Tuned Radio Frequency (TRF) regenerative design. Many sources only cover the Superheterodyne type that became the standard in the 1930's. I think Ed Romney's book covers TRF. Others here can help when you are ready to start working on your set.

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Mon 09, 2017 9:40 pm 
New Member

Joined: Jan Sat 07, 2017 9:45 pm
Posts: 11
Location: St. Louis MO
Thank you all for the info. I appreciate how quickly the responses were given.

I have been tonostalgiaair.org. The only listing for a Standard Radio was for an AC 29. I found Phil's Beginner's Pages the other week and have been reading them.

I'm a learn by doing type. Until I get my fingers onto something and can start looking at from different directions, it's hard for me to put things together. I can read schematics, but there's a difference between what's on paper and how that is done on the item.

There are no transformers on the chassis, no tubes and one of the tube sockets is broken.

I've started to trace the wiring as was mentioned by Radiomania.

I have a G.E. 12" Radio speaker field coil type. My plans are to make this a console radio.

Tim


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Tue 10, 2017 12:38 am 
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Location: 08033 Cherry Hill Jersey
Also check if there's an Antique Radio Club in your vicinity. Sometimes they have repair clinics.

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Tue 10, 2017 12:40 am 
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Joined: Dec Wed 25, 2013 7:57 am
Posts: 1192
Location: USA
Is this your radio?

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=247769&view=previous

http://www.antiqueradios.com/forums/vie ... 1&t=212577

If so, this radio has no transformer because these early home radios were designed to operate with an external set of batteries. When you are ready, start a thread in the electrical restoration section so folks can help you navigate through the restoration process. Please don't do anything to it yet.

You may find this wiki informative:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tuned_rad ... y_receiver

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Tue 10, 2017 1:31 am 
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Joined: Jan Tue 31, 2012 2:17 am
Posts: 162
Location: Hamilton, ON, CA
No transformers?

There wouldn't be a power transformer (large and heavy) but there were typically two small audio transformers, something like 2" x 2" x 2" or so in these types of sets. Take a careful look to see if there was something there, between each of the 01A tubes, that may have been removed. Its not unusual to find radios with these missing.

Otherwise, it is possible, but not likely, that this radio could have used something called RC coupling between the detector and first audio and second audio stages.

Could you post a picture of your set including one with a top view of the chassis inside?


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Tue 10, 2017 2:39 am 
New Member

Joined: Jan Sat 07, 2017 9:45 pm
Posts: 11
Location: St. Louis MO
There are two holes where I'm guessing the transformers were. There isn't a cabinet, it's just the chassis and front face plate. I have most of a schematic drawn up now. At least what I can identify.
I appreciate the help.
Tim

[img][IMG]http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh69/phendlin/Standardyne%20Bottom.jpg[/img][/img]

[img][IMG]http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh69/phendlin/Standardyne%20Top.jpg[/img][/img]

[img][IMG]http://i253.photobucket.com/albums/hh69/phendlin/Standyne%20Front.jpg[/img][/img]


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Thu 12, 2017 1:29 am 
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Joined: Jan Tue 31, 2012 2:17 am
Posts: 162
Location: Hamilton, ON, CA
Wow, you have your work cut out for you. Restoration will be significant. That set is missing a lot, and to be totally honest with you, it would be a parts set to most; appears to have already been one. Major issues: missing audio transformers, missing part of bakelite panel, missing all tuning knobs, broken tube socket, missing cabinet - although its sometimes cool to have the radio only without one, lots of corrosion so major clean up - although not insurmountable. Minor issues: missing switch, missing jack.

If you're keen to restore this to the nines as they say, you will need a cabinet, which means probably buying another set that has all, if not most of what you need, and combining the two. Sometimes there's no other way. I have repaired bakelite but only with matching pieces using krazy glue - it works well enough. Another option may be to recreate the panel in acrylic using a high speed CNC cutter for the engraving if you have access to such technology; it just won't be original.

To find a second set, or parts you can try the wanted to buy classifieds located elsewhere in the forum index or there's always ebay. I would caution you though, that generally, unless exceptionally rare, these 3 dial 5 tubers are not high value sets so what you're about to undertake is merely for "the fun of it" given the work involved.


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Thu 12, 2017 2:17 am 
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Joined: Jan Tue 31, 2012 2:17 am
Posts: 162
Location: Hamilton, ON, CA
The links below will give you a good idea of what your radio should look like along with other details.

http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/standard3_ ... tubes.html

http://www.canadianvintageradio.com/cvr ... andardyne/


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Thu 12, 2017 6:44 pm 
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Joined: Aug Mon 20, 2012 12:23 pm
Posts: 933
Location: Groveland MA
radiomania wrote:
Wow, you have your work cut out for you. Restoration will be significant. That set is missing a lot, and to be totally honest with you, it would be a parts set to most; appears to have already been one.


I have to agree with this, you really do need a lot. If you go ahead with this let me know, I should have a front panel that I can send you.

Russ

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Thu 12, 2017 6:47 pm 
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AJJ wrote:


Nope, that was mine. I ended up using it for parts for other projects.

Russ

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Thu 12, 2017 6:48 pm 
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Joined: Dec Wed 25, 2013 7:57 am
Posts: 1192
Location: USA
I apologize Russ. I really should have said "Does your radio look this one?" :)

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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Sat 14, 2017 11:47 pm 
New Member

Joined: Jan Sat 07, 2017 9:45 pm
Posts: 11
Location: St. Louis MO
Heya all, Thanks for posting. It's encouraging. It really does need a lot of work :wink:

I love history and being able to touch and have that connection to the past. I want to bring it back to life with all its' imperfections-there's a beauty and attraction in that. It's shouts, look what I've been through and I'm still here, it shows its' age and longevity. I'm going to make a console for it so it will be a free standing unit. I purchased a GE field coil speaker to that end.

I'm going through the 1948 NRI course (purchased a dvd of the entire course). There's so much in that and it's helping fill in gaps and increasing my understanding how these things really work. I'm on lesson 4. :D

I've been spending some time on americanradiohistory's site. They have most of the 1930 NRI course there.

I'll clean up the front panel, trim where it's been broken and substitute a piece of plexiglass for that section.

I've contacted Mark Oppat and he's doing some checking for the vernier dials and transformers. He'd said he thought the transformers were typical 1:3 ratio interstage transformers.

On top of the RF coils there are what looks like fuzes. What are they?

Thank you all for your help

Tim


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 12:38 am 
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Joined: Jan Tue 31, 2012 2:17 am
Posts: 162
Location: Hamilton, ON, CA
I can't see them in photos I've found but they are likely cartridge resistors. If you take your VOM or DMM you can check them for their resistance which may be 500Kohm and up.

Audio interstage transformers were typically 1:3 or 1:4 ratios either will work OK. Mark is an excellent resource for parts. I have purchased many from him in the past.

Another good reference for radio theory is "Basic Electronics" vols 1 through 6 by VanValkenburg, Nooger and Neville. Very easy to follow and would cover all the circuits that this radio would use.


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 Post subject: Re: New Member
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 10:24 pm 
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Joined: Jan Sat 07, 2017 9:45 pm
Posts: 11
Location: St. Louis MO
I've downloaded "Basic Electronics" 6 parts/volumes. I'll start working it into my current curriculum :wink:

The set didn't come with anything in those places. I have my Fluke, but nothing there to use it on. :? I have continuity with the RF coils, I guess that's something....

Tim


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