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Unknown Tube Radio
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Author:  Crossfield [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 4:27 pm ]
Post subject:  Unknown Tube Radio

Hello everyone,

Im new to the forum. I was hoping someone could help identify this old tube radio.
Any help would be appreciated.

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Author:  Indiana Radios [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 6:40 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

Overall construction of the chassis looks to be homebuilt. Even though the dial face has two bands, only one is band is permanently used in conjunction with that narrow dial display window. The entire radio just screams homebrew. There won't be any brandnames, published schematics, or a manufacturer's name tied in with that radio. Maybe you could find the name of whoever built it and maybe you could find some published plans of which the builder based building this radio from. A homebuilder could buy blank cabinets from either a mail order electronics outfit or from some local radio store and custom fit his chassis into it. I think that's what happened here.

Author:  Crossfield [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 6:54 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

Hey thanks for the advice. Makes sense that it would be a homebrew. Can’t find another like it.
I am very new to tube radios and was thinking it might be a good first project since it looks quite simple.

Author:  Mr. Detrola [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 7:05 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

What I think it's most likely to be is one of the training kits supplied with correspondence courses, which allowed a person to do various experiments as part of the lessons, but at the end of the course they would have a working radio. I would have expected the name of the school to be printed on the dial scale though.

You could always sit down and trace the wiring and draw the schematic of how it's connected using tube basing information from a tube manual.

Author:  Indiana Radios [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 7:07 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

If you truly have the itch to work on vintage tube radios, I would suggest attending your nearest antique radio club's next swap meet as an excellent source of radios to work on, support and advise. Where are you from?

Author:  Crossfield [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 7:13 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

I am located in newbrunswick Canada.
You guys have some good points. I didn’t think I it to be a home kit for how old it looked.
Not sure what there is for tube radio guys around here but I haven’t really looked

Author:  Indiana Radios [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 7:18 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

Mr. Detrola wrote:
What I think it's most likely to be is one of the training kits supplied with correspondence courses...


I seriously doubt it. It doesn't look like any known brand name training kit chassis that I've ever seen. Look at the two lower controls and how they are mounted. Thier both mounted on large clunky support plates that have been poorly cut and attached to the main chassis.

Image

Look at the huge space gap between the tuning assembly and the two lower controls. That doesn't look like a design from any respectable correspondence course that I'm aware of unless it was a really cheap correspondence course. All kit chassis, that I've seen, from correspondence courses have all been small, compact and well laid out. This chassis has none of those attributes.

Author:  Indiana Radios [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 7:32 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

Crossfield wrote:
I am located in newbrunswick Canada.


Boy, your a bit isolated but not completely. Probably the closest club to you is the New England Antique Radio Club: http://www.nearc.net/

Ontario Vintage Radio Association: http://www.ovra.ca/index.php

Maybe some ARF members, who live in your area, will chime in and help you out.

Author:  Mr. Detrola [ Dec Sun 24, 2017 7:37 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

It's unlikely that we will ever know. I agree with Michael that parts of this radio are quite cobbled up, but the professionally made dial scale and matched set of coils below the chassis are curious, especially since one of the coils isn't even connected into the circuit. I wouldn't expect a homebrew builder working from plans in a magazine article for example to have obtained a matched set of coils but only used two of them. In addition from the photos it appears the chassis was supplied with holes punched, since there are extras which are unused.

It seems like there should have been some further progression beyond where this is currently assembled, that could have included additional features like the second band?

Maybe someone disassembled one or more junk radios to build this one, or bought surplus parts from a catalog specializing in such things. Given the overall appearance and the use of top cap metal tubes, this was most likely built some time from the late 30's through the 40's although it could be much newer. We used those same metal tubes in electronics lab experiments in college in the late 1960's because the instructor had been there for decades and felt they were difficult to damage if dropped or roughly handled in comparison to glass tubes.

Author:  CharcBait [ Dec Thu 28, 2017 7:22 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

I sure feel your pain. Like you I'm new to antique radios. I've been given 3, none of which I can identify exactly, so none for which I can find schematics--maybe that's why they were so freely given to me! I took the simplest-looking one, a Hartco 4-tube cathedral from the early 30s, as my first project and replaced all the paper and electrolytic caps...then turned it on. It hums.
So I guess I'll be following some of the advice you received, like trying to draw my own schematic from a visual inspection and the 80-47-24-24 layout info. I'm in the BC Rockies, so the nearest club is probably Calgary--8 hours away.
Good luck with your project!
Cheers,
Chuck in Rossland

Author:  DaleMidori [ Dec Sun 31, 2017 8:57 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

Chuck,

Isn't Spokane closer to you than Calgary? Must be some antique radio activity around there. Sounds like you
did the right thing initially by recapping it. Are all the tubes OK? And the transformers/coils?

That's a nice looking radio. Good luck with it.

Dale

Author:  zenith82 [ Dec Sun 31, 2017 8:21 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Unknown Tube Radio

I'm thinking that the chassis and dial started as a kit, but that it was "hot-rodded" as it was built. It looks like something an experimenter or maybe an engineering student did in the late '30s.

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