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 Post subject: just how rare grigsby-grunow
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 2:06 am 
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Joined: Sep Fri 22, 2006 6:29 pm
Posts: 1116
Location: powell wyoming
ive done a little research on the grigsby-grunow co. and i see they were only in buissness from 1928 thru 1933 when the depression broke them, then the name was purchased several times thru the years
ive been looking for any production numbers an this model 71 with the model 70 chassis becouse its a step sidded affair and i was unsure it wasnt a frankin radio but im not seeing much for info :? , i havent been able to find any pics in the usual places either
i guess im curiouse since this one is ( i think ) a 1928 early in their radio production buissnes how many radios they sold 1n 28

buck


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 4:02 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 4393
Location: St. Louis, MO, USA
Grigsby-Grunow sets from the period you mention are often listed under the name Majestic. (not to be confused with Rogers-Majestic, a Canadian outfit)

I'm not sure just what the connection between the two names was. Perhaps Grigsby-Grunow was the company name and Majestic was a trade name. As far as I know, it was not a case of one company buying the other out. Maybe someone can clarify this.

The 70 and 90 series do not appear to be all that rare. There have been quite a number of posts from members who have them, so the production numbers must have been high. The tone quality seems to have been a step above many competetive radios of the period, and they were pretty popular for a brief period. Sort of like a shooting star that blazes brilliantly across the sky and then dissappears.

Our own Photo Gallery has some examples of them. Use the search function for "Majestic 70," or "Majestic 71," or "Majestic 90," etc.
Like This:
http://antiqueradios.com/gallery/v/Maje ... 1.jpg.html


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 4:12 am 
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Joined: Sep Fri 22, 2006 6:29 pm
Posts: 1116
Location: powell wyoming
thanks oldbear
i had look in the photo gallery previously and am unable to find this paticular cabinet, it kinda is like a console with a box on top of it :roll:
i see what you mean about a lot of posts, althou im finding more on the 90,s than the 70,s stuff, im inclined to agree with you that they must have hit the ground running and had a fairly large product run right outa the gate

thanks again
buck


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 4:21 am 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Tue 16, 2007 11:48 pm
Posts: 9664
Location: Hueytown, AL
Majestic was the brand name of the Grigsby-Grunow Co. formed in 1928, financial problems forced it to reorganize in 1933 into the Majestic Radio and Television Co. and the General Household Utilities Co. which made the Grunow line until 1937. Just how Majestic evolved after that I don't know.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 4:56 am 
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Joined: Apr Tue 03, 2007 1:31 am
Posts: 3459
Location: Jonesville, MI
The Majestic sets were some of the best selling radios in the early days of light-socket operation, as the were well engineered, and offered exceptional value for the money. The ealry 1928 models were most commonly available in a four-legged console cabinet with a stepped in upper section, which held the tuner chassis. I suspect that you have one of these sets.

10MFD filters will work just fine, although 1 and 2 MFD units were used in the original design. I have replaced the filters in a number of these sets, and notie no trouble with excessive voltage on the B+ line.

The tuning condensers in these sets are prone to deterioration, howwever. The alloy that was used to hold the aluminum rotor plates to their shaft tends to swell slightly, over time, and make it impossible for all gangs to mesh fully without shorting. If the swelling is not too severe the problem may sometimes be remedied by adjusting the rotor bearings, and a little JUDICIOUS bending of any rubbing plates.

You might well consider checking your tuning condenser gang for shorts and rubbing before essayint to rebuild the power pack.

By the way, while the Grigsby Grunow company DID reorganise, expand, and sell a great deal of stock in 1928, they did so on the basis of their new set, which was introduced to the market in the autumn of 1927, and which was, in 1928 selling like the proverbial hotcakes.

The Grigsby-Grunow-Hinds company was the manufacturer of America's best selling B battery eliminator in 1925/6/7, and, after 1926 also made an excellent A battery eliminator, and, beginning in 1924, a very popular horn loudspeaker. These speakers were good sellers, and were quite attractive, featuring celluloid horns in black, or a variety of attractive colors. Today these horns are quite scarc, and rather highly sought-after, for the fragile nature of the celluloid bell mitigated against the survival of great numbers of these horns.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 6:48 pm 
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Joined: Sep Fri 22, 2006 6:29 pm
Posts: 1116
Location: powell wyoming
wow thanks guys
if i ever get this pic posting figured out ill throw one in the gallery, althou it doesnt sound like a way rare item it sure is an impressive console and man its HEAVY :shock: .
thanks for all your imput

buck


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 7:44 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5071
Location: Ortonville, Michigan
Vit'nola has said it pretty much the way it is.

One other thing you need to watch. G&G never bolted the power supply into the cabinet. Many were the movers that lifted the set to carry it, back down, then heard a crash, only tro see the power supply on yhr floor, and the big cable torn out of it by the roots. Then, even in the thirties, the rubber insulated wires in the big cable had dried out insulation, and if you were to bend the cable, you'd hear a crunch, and the cloth covering had a bunch of bare wires, and dried out crumbs around them.

No need to draw pictures; the service business hated Majestic with a passion for the above reasons.

Their model 72, had the 70 chassis, but with doors. One version of it had some handsome diamond inlays. There were no two of that model alike.

G&G also did the 70 chassis in one other model with all 27 tubes in the receiver chassis instead of the 26's, and two 50's in the output instead of the 71A's. Those 50 jugs really give that speaker a workout.

You may want to re-do the power cable. Leaving it be is sort of risky, because in the past, someone must have moved it. It's a nice set, once up and running.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 7:49 pm 
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Joined: Nov Thu 22, 2007 10:25 pm
Posts: 4588
Location: Moline Illinois
That mish-mash in Majestic's history with all the G men and bankruptcies has always confused me.

I bought a radio I was told was a Canadian Majestic a few years ago and it has several of those black rogers tubes in it (its a 5/8 chassis) but the dial in front says MAJESTIC, not Rogers and its about circa 1935 or so. The woodwork of the cabinet is superb even though its a lowely 5 tube radio. Also its a rather heavy set and the dial lites up in neato Green when changing to the various bands on the dial. It make a great holder for my laptop too BTW as its just the right height when I am standing up typing this message.

Bruce


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 15, 2008 11:40 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5071
Location: Ortonville, Michigan
After Grigsby-Grunow went belly-up, the Majestic name was kicked around for sever al decades. When one speaks of Majestic, it's necessary to specify what year period it was built in. (maybe even the time of day)

Don't feel lost because you're not sure about the set. Many others are always confused.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Wed 16, 2008 1:07 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 27589
Location: Pocasset, Cape Cod, MA
Juggling a few numbers printed in Radio Mfrs. of the 1920s, vol.2, sales figures and per-day producation numbers, I would guess that 300,000 model 71s or 72s were made.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Wed 16, 2008 4:21 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 574
Location: Ontario Canada
y2k Bruce wrote:
That mish-mash in Majestic's history with all the G men and bankruptcies has always confused me.

I bought a radio I was told was a Canadian Majestic a few years ago and it has several of those black rogers tubes in it (its a 5/8 chassis) but the dial in front says MAJESTIC, not Rogers and its about circa 1935 or so. The woodwork of the cabinet is superb even though its a lowely 5 tube radio. Also its a rather heavy set and the dial lites up in neato Green when changing to the various bands on the dial. It make a great holder for my laptop too BTW as its just the right height when I am standing up typing this message.

Bruce


Bruce, your Majestic radio was made by Rogers Majestic in Canada. Rogers merged with Majestic in Canada in 1928. I don't think there were any common sets between the two countries. Rogers Majestic would usually put out a separate Rogers and Majestic version of a radio with the same chassis but with different dials and cabinet style.
Here are some examples of different sets manufactured by Rogers Majestic from my collection. To confuse things they added a De Forest Crosley line in 1934.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/14637287@N05/sets/72157603541223068/


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Wed 16, 2008 5:56 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 4989
Don DB:

Wow! some impressive looking radios. Congratulations on an outstanding collection. I absolutely love the Rogers 10-51; Great style and unusual with the speaker at the bottom:
Image

I'm also drawn to the Majestic Madelaine - - - in some respects it kinda looks like someone had been looking over someone else's shoulder at Stromberg Carlson. The set still has it's own style and individuality though, and is a great looking set (not to mention it's one of the lesser seen "left-handed" receivers).
Image

Thanks again Don DB for sharing your sets with us. truly an outstanding collection.
.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Wed 16, 2008 5:51 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 4989
.
This is a really interesting thread. I like Majestic receivers and their offspring a lot and over the years have owned several including a model "52" that has to be one of the heaviest receivers for it's size of any produced during that time period. Most Majestic sets and their descendants were good to excellent performers for their respective time periods.

Majestic receivers, as well as those produced by their "offspring" firms, are to be found in an amazing array of styles, levels of quality, and with an assortment of manufacturer's names attached. Following the dismissal of William C. Grunow from Majestic's presidency in January of 1931, Grunow started his own company which then merged with U.S. Radio and Television in mid 1933. The name of the Firm was eventually changed to "General Household Utilities Company." From that point until the last sets left the firm in 1937, General Household Utilities produced sets under the founder's name - - - "Grunow."

Last year I purchased a model 801 Grunow eight tube console with their "8A" Superhetrodyne chassis. , apparently produced sometime shortly after William Grunow left Majestic and founded G.H.U. There are a few small veneer issues to deal with but the cabinet is solid and I think this one will be a "keeper" when it's eventually brought back to near-original condition.
Image


Though still awaiting restoration, the set has some very attractive (to me) styling and engineering details. The control arrangement is typical for the time period with a small "keyhole" dial opening and a more or less usual arrangement of the controls. Grunow spiffed up the area by adding small brass escutcheons to the volume and tone controls, allowing the operator to have a nice illuminated visual indication of their settings.
Image


Fortunately the chassis of this set is in nice condition under years of grime, dirt, and Mud Wasp's nests. It should clean up very well.

Curiously, the grease pencil notation on the filter condenser indicates it was apparently replaced in November of 1936.
Image


Some interesting design features of the chassis include the "pre-sets" for tuning (the spider web dingus on the back of the tuning gang). No, it's not missing a tube - - - the empty socket is for the speaker plug.
Image


On the back apron of the set's chassis is the ID/Licensing plate featuring a (supposed) copy of William C. Grunow's signature, along with the original wrench for adjusting the station pre-sets.
Image


With warm weather will come a complete cleaning, a cabinet refurbishment, and I'll go through the electrics at that time as well. In the meantime, Fluffy has claimed it as her own, and so far refuses to relinquish ownership. Just how I'll get around that problem I'm not quite sure.
Image

Hey, it's a Hobby ~ ~ ~ not Rocket Surgery.
.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Wed 16, 2008 7:11 pm 
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Joined: Jan Wed 16, 2008 7:05 pm
Posts: 43
Location: Miami,Florida
Zbiker not to worry you`re 71 is genuine (as is mine) not a frankinradio.There seems to be an extroadinary number of 90`s
out there


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Wed 16, 2008 7:56 pm 
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Joined: Nov Thu 22, 2007 10:25 pm
Posts: 4588
Location: Moline Illinois
Here's my Majestic - Rogers 5 tube console. It has 5 tubes and was advertised with the performance of an 8 tube set. The cabinet has the name Laurien stamped in it in the back. A nice looking and pretty heavy set.

Has a cool green lit dial when turned on.
Image


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Wed 16, 2008 8:35 pm 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Tue 16, 2007 11:48 pm
Posts: 9664
Location: Hueytown, AL
Where is the wag that should ask what color is the dial before it is turned on? :o Grigsby- Gronow also used some brass trimmed knobs on the Majestic line. Nice touch.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Wed 16, 2008 11:38 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1057
Location: Newburyport, MA. USA
An interesting model is the 1932 Majestic 307, often mistaken for model 300 since it's chassis was labeled 'model 300', but all advertising identified it as model 307.

This console took Gothic design to the extreme, twin back-lit stained glass panels, pipe organ carving speaker grill framed by arches. A performer that had 11 tubes and Majestics famous speaker, it has very big sound.

Never seen another at shows or on ebay but one did show up in ARC's auction report a couple of years ago for $500. unrestored.

Any futher information on this great console....please share :?:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 17, 2008 12:25 am 
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Joined: Sep Fri 22, 2006 6:29 pm
Posts: 1116
Location: powell wyoming
holy smokes !!!!!!
i had no idea their were so many "majestic fans" :shock: . and i had no idea their were so many of the 1928 -1929 models produced, and yes i definitly can understand the service indistries hatred of these, their schematics leave lots to be desired compared to the atwater kents and stromberg carlsons from what i can tell.

i am despretly working on getting a pic up for everyone ( so many radios, so little time :lol: ), kinda a before and after thing, hope to have it posted today.
guys this has turned into a very informitive thread for me anyways
thanks a bunch

buck


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 17, 2008 12:31 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 847
Dale Davenport wrote:
.
---snip---

Last year I purchased a model 801 Grunow eight tube console with their "8A" Superhetrodyne chassis. , apparently produced sometime shortly after William Grunow left Majestic and founded G.H.U. There are a few small veneer issues to deal with but the cabinet is solid and I think this one will be a "keeper" when it's eventually brought back to near-original condition.

--snip--




Thanks for posting that. I have a chassis like that I bought a long time ago. I was going to post about it here, but just hadn't got around to it. I didn't know what it was exactly, and never saw a picture of any grunow online that had a control layout that looked right, until about a month ago I stumbled over a model 902 online, and I eventually figured out mine was an 801. I had no idea what the cabinet looked like until you posted those pics. Now I will know one if I see it.


John

.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 17, 2008 12:47 am 
Member

Joined: Sep Fri 22, 2006 6:29 pm
Posts: 1116
Location: powell wyoming
holy smokes !!!!!!
i had no idea their were so many "majestic fans" :shock: . and i had no idea their were so many of the 1928 -1929 models produced, and yes i definitly can understand the service indistries hatred of these, their schematics leave lots to be desired compared to the atwater kents and stromberg carlsons from what i can tell.

i am despretly working on getting a pic up for everyone ( so many radios, so little time :lol: ), kinda a before and after thing, hope to have it posted today.
guys this has turned into a very informitive thread for me anyways
thanks a bunch

buck


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