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 Post subject: Dial String Slippage Tonic: Elmer's Spray Adhesive
PostPosted: Jun Wed 20, 2007 7:10 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 4941
Location: La Porte, IN, USA
Three years and 1 month ago, I applied some Elmer's Spray Adhesive to a Zenith Royal 1000 TransOceanic's dial cord, in order to stop slight slippage at the lower end of the dial. Being lazy, I didn't want to disassemble the whole thing to properly tighten the dial cord.
It has worked perfectly since then, so I think it may be safe to recommend this as a "temporary fix".
It was applied liberally to the cord with an artist's paint brush, through the open back, rotating the tuning knob so as to get it on most of the length of cord. The Elmer's was sprayed into a cup, then the brush dunked in it.
This stuff remains "tacky" for a long time. It is used to temporarily mount pictures and paper things, while allowing them to be removed without damage at a later date. Very sticky stuff. And it works--at least for a while...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Wed 20, 2007 8:29 pm 
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Location: Beautiful Downtown Burbank CA
I've use Elmers spray for dial strings too. Everyone has their favorite. I had a rubber tree that dripped white sap when you snapped a leaf. That worked great too.

The spray works to hold paper patterns when cutting on the band saw.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Mon 25, 2007 6:52 pm 
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Joined: Dec Sat 30, 2006 9:03 pm
Posts: 243
Location: Melrose, NY
My favorite is a product called POW'R TAC, sold in my area at
Dick's sporting goods chain. Its target market is for baseball
bats, replacing the old rosin bag.

I have leather grips on the golf clubs, and it _really_ works
well in that application, too.

Don, WA2YQY@cs.com


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Sun 01, 2007 5:25 pm 
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Location: Sarasota, Florida
I may as well chime in. When the dial cord slips, I typically go over everything to ensure it's lubricated and moving as freely as possible. Then I ensure the dial cord itself is tight.

If, after a complete mechanical redo doesn't solve the problem, I get out my trusty bottle of Pliobond, brush a little (sparingly) onto the cord, and work it back and forth several times. I've also had belts slip, and an application of Pliobond on the pulleys works there as well. It's actually a type of contact cement, but an application leaves a rubbery film that makes the cords and belts grip tight. However I like to keep the cord/belt moving several times to prevent it from being "glued" into place.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Fri 13, 2007 10:31 am 
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I have found that bees wax or just the wax on an old paper cap does a really great job.

I take a scraping of wax off the old capacitor body with a small screwdriver blade and then just squish it onto the cord as it is wound on the shaft. I may also rub an old wax cap along the cord itself. Perfect solution ...and I always have the wax right there handy on an old cap somewhere.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Tue 31, 2007 4:38 pm 
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Location: La Porte, IN, USA
Three Years, two months. still O.K. :wink:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Aug Mon 03, 2009 6:25 pm 
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Five years. Still works great!
Temporarily, of course!
:wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink: :wink:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Aug Thu 13, 2009 3:31 am 
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Sounds like a good fix for my Admiral.


Temporarily, of course ;)

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Saving America's acoustical history, one phonograph at a time..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Aug Sat 15, 2009 1:52 am 
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Location: Southern NH, 03076
All the dirt it picked up over the years probably helped.

Ive been using pure beeswax for about 45 years but it really needs to be done before the cord is strung. Heat a spot on an edge with a soldering iron and then draw the cord thru.

A little bit goes a long way, I still have a good size block that I got from National when I left in 69.

Carl


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: May Mon 17, 2010 2:41 pm 
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Couple more months and it'll be SIX Years. The ZTO still tunes fine.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Wed 09, 2010 10:07 am 
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Okay, I'm going to buy some of this tomorrow.

I'm working on a GE set from the late '50s or early '60s. I've spent the better part of two evenings trying to restring the dial cord.

No matter how I string it, how many times I wrap it around the shaft, and no matter how tight it is, the darn tuning shaft just turns and turns, but the tuning capacitors don't turn with it.

If, on the other hand, I turn the capacitors by hand...bingo, even the tuning shaft moves. I'm really tired of messing with this blasted thing!! :evil: I'm at the end of my cord...er, rope.

Aaron


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sun 27, 2010 10:37 pm 
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Joined: May Sun 09, 2010 3:43 pm
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If the shaft the dial string wraps around has been polished from slippage, try roughing it up a little with some fine sand paper. You don't want to go wild but just enough to break the glaze and improve friction a bit.

I have also used isopropyl alcohol to clean the cord and surfaces.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Aug Fri 06, 2010 1:25 am 
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Location: Cincinnati, OH
I got a little hasty with deoxit lube the other day and now the dial string on my Zenith console slips..what should I try to solve this?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Aug Fri 06, 2010 1:52 am 
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Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
I would let it dry out in a place that air circulating around the chassis for a week.
Curt

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(Connoisseur of the cold 807) CW forever!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Aug Sun 22, 2010 3:07 am 
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Location: Phila Pa
Capacitor wax X2.
Heat it up a tad, Hold it to the dial string and wind back and forth a few times, Heat the cap a couple time while doing this,,
You already have the wax, Use it.
Peter


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Sep Wed 07, 2011 5:48 pm 
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Location: La Porte, IN, USA
OZ132HOME wrote:
Couple more months and it'll be SIX Years. The ZTO still tunes fine.

7 YEARS, Still working fine...

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Apolitical and Agnostic Forever (Well, on the Forum, anyway)! -OZ


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 Post subject: Re: Dial String Slippage Tonic: Elmer's Spray Adhesive
PostPosted: Oct Sat 29, 2011 6:43 pm 
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Joined: May Fri 16, 2008 2:26 am
Posts: 1744
Location: Navasota Texas
On dial shafts which have been polished smooth through years of the cord rubbing, I've used P.C. board etching liquid to roughen it up a little. That also works great on the 8-track players where the rubber pressure roller has shined up the shaft too much.


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 Post subject: Re: Dial String Slippage Tonic: Elmer's Spray Adhesive
PostPosted: Nov Wed 02, 2011 12:50 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: owings mills, md, usa
Among the various substances


I have used Krylon clear coat quite effectively and yes, you got to keep the dial moving until the stuff is dry.


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 Post subject: Re: Dial String Slippage Tonic: Elmer's Spray Adhesive
PostPosted: Nov Wed 02, 2011 11:22 pm 
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I have suggested the use of rosin or bee's wax in a previous post.. but ...
...Actually if the pulleys are properly lubricated on their shafts and moving freely and if the pointer is also not restricted AND if the main pulley is clean and smooth with no rust where the cord rides ... there should be no need for any tacky stuff on the cord.
The small drive shaft is often made such that it has a v-shaped or valley-shaped depression where the cord rides. This is where the cord is usually wrapped around 2-1/2 or 3 times.
That groove MUST be shiny and smooth as the cord needs to slide up and down the valley to prevent it from overlapping itself on long travel or reverse travel.
With proper tension on the slack-tensioning spring and ALL smooth freely moving wheels and shafts there should not really ever be a need for rosin or such.
Yes rosin can help if the cord is stretched or to get past a problem of drag... but it is not the total, proper answer... only a patch so to speak.
If you have patience and you can actually get the cord on "right" with all wheels free and smooth surfaced...it will not need anything else.

I have spoken ... lol

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To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


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 Post subject: Re: Dial String Slippage Tonic: Elmer's Spray Adhesive
PostPosted: May Fri 25, 2012 7:15 pm 
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Joined: Feb Mon 20, 2012 10:03 pm
Posts: 613
Location: Ohio
Pbpix wrote:
I have suggested the use of rosin or bee's wax in a previous post.. but ...
...Actually if the pulleys are properly lubricated on their shafts and moving freely and if the pointer is also not restricted AND if the main pulley is clean and smooth with no rust where the cord rides ... there should be no need for any tacky stuff on the cord.
The small drive shaft is often made such that it has a v-shaped or valley-shaped depression where the cord rides. This is where the cord is usually wrapped around 2-1/2 or 3 times.
That groove MUST be shiny and smooth as the cord needs to slide up and down the valley to prevent it from overlapping itself on long travel or reverse travel.
With proper tension on the slack-tensioning spring and ALL smooth freely moving wheels and shafts there should not really ever be a need for rosin or such.
Yes rosin can help if the cord is stretched or to get past a problem of drag... but it is not the total, proper answer... only a patch so to speak.
If you have patience and you can actually get the cord on "right" with all wheels free and smooth surfaced...it will not need anything else.

I have spoken ... lol

You speak well and I have done exactly as you outline. I might add that it is extremely important to check the tuning capacitor rubber mounts. As they decay and turn to coal dust, the dial cord tension will pull up on the large pulley throwing the assembly out of alignment. View the tuning capacitor from the end of the chassis and check to be sure it is sitting perpendicular to the top of the chassis. Grasp the tuning capacitor and see if it is solidly mounted or rocks. On the typical RCA chassis, grommets (OD.5625 ID.2500) can be used to replace the original rubbers. Before attempting to push them into the three chassis holes, first heat with a blow dryer or hot water to make them pliable. When hot, two-thirds of the grommet can be pushed into it's hole and the remainder using a small screwdriver blade. Also, use finger on opposit side to pull edge of grommet into position.


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