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 Post subject: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Mon 10, 2017 6:04 pm 
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Location: Gold Country, (Stanislaus National Forest) California 95235
Neighboring dialects you could see where one region would pick up from another.
But I'm talking about regions that have dialect similarities that are hundreds if not thousands of miles apart or even on a different coast.

I grew up in New England til I was four,
moved in with my grandparents in the Steel Valley (OH/PA/WV/MD)
spent summers with my great-granddad (VA/KY/TN/NC)
had great uncles from New Orleans and Houston
moved to L A in `92
moved to Northern Ca in 2007

and found out that all my dialect retentions from the Eastern and Southern accents are fully understood in Northern California where I would often have to explain Inland North-isms (General American/Great Lakes) to Angelenos and the same with New England-isms to the Appalachians and so on and so on.

People here know what `pop' is (a carbonated sweet drink - Inland-North)
they crawl up under a hap (comforter - Appalachian) in the winter to get warm,
people ask `Where y'at' when they mean Hello, (New Orleans/Houston)
some people drink ``wooter'' (water - Philadelphia)
out of a ``bubbler'' (New England and Midland North)
and `eeeask' if you are going to ``twk tah hah'' (talk to her - New York City)
they get water out of a `spicket' (faucet - NC/TN/KY/VA)
people ``woresh'' their clothes and ``craysh'' their cars (Prairie and Appalachian)
and they eat ``city chicken'' (pork - usually cubed - Houston)

and nobody has to ever ask anybody to rephrase.

I would have thought that L.A. would have been the Great American Melting Pot - but it seems that San Francisco and especially Silicon Valley have a much wider range of understood vocabulary than almost anyplace else I have ever lived.

It's even more prevalent out in the Sierra Nevadas (between Yosemite and the Lassen Forest where I moved out to a couple of years ago) - because I can be on the phone with or just having flown back from relatives in either the Northern (Steel Valley) or Southern (Coal Valley) Appalachians - and not only does every third man here understand me perfectly - half of `em sounds as if they are from the Appalachians, nearly 3K miles away even though they've never even been there and none of their relatives are from there either.

As Yul Brynner once said: Is puzzlement.

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Mon 10, 2017 8:44 pm 
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Location: Boiling Springs, PA
-My kids pick on my Mom for using 'worsh' instead of wash.
-My Grandparents used to say "Wrench out that wet rag" instead of 'wring'.
-If your glass is empty then 'it's all' as in "I had a full glass but now its all" this is purely PA Dutch influenced.
-"Check the oral in the car"
-"Be careful on the wet road its slippy"
- It seems a county line around here separates "You'ins" from "You'z" and in western PA its "Y'inz"
- many sentences end with 'at' Like "I dont know where its at"

Down in Western N.C. when we visit family its usually:
"We were fixin' to go to the movies if y'all want"
"Its gettin' dark so make sure to burn your headlights."

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Mon 10, 2017 9:43 pm 
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Location: Gold Country, (Stanislaus National Forest) California 95235
The point of this thread was more contrasting ``what other far away place do you hear X besides it's normal place''
flyboy71 wrote:
"We were fixin' to go to the movies if y'all want"
e.g. Where else besides generically in the South and in African-American Vernacular English do you hear ``y'all'' and where else besides the Eastern Seaboard do you hear `youns/yinz?
flyboy71 wrote:
"Check the oral in the car"
like: Nearer to Pittsburgh - and also paradoxically around St Louis - you put ``gayss'' and ``earl'' in a car like the aforementioned Appalachian and Prairie areas both say `worsh' i.e. Pittsburgh and Kansas City.
flyboy71 wrote:
"I dont know where its at"
Pittsburgh and New Orleans
flyboy71 wrote:
"Burn your headlights."
Appalachia and Phoenix/Albuquerque.
flyboy71 wrote:
"I had a full glass but now its all" (gone) this is purely PA Dutch influenced.
Don't be so sure. I hear that from Mormons and Mennonites everytime I go skiing in e.g. Salt Lake City - so that qualifies too as it's 2500 miles between Pgh and Salt Lake.

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Tue 11, 2017 12:22 am 
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Well there was a substantial migration of people to Ca. during the dust bowl, probably to areas that were more familiar to agriculture, I would assume? They would have brought their own language traits with them.


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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Tue 11, 2017 1:57 am 
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Location: Tucson, Arizona U.S.A.
And radio, television, and movies can spread vocabularies and usages even to other countries so it isn't surprising that people understand them even if they don't use them themselves.

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Tue 11, 2017 2:22 am 
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Location: Milton, FL 32570
I find that Even if I don't a word someone is say I will understand it in the context of the conversation. I don't focus too much on how one says words as to what they are talking about.
I'm in my forties and have been in NWFL since I was six. We get all kinds of people around here because of Whiting Field and NAS Pensacola. My dad just decided this is where we will plant our feet. And I've never been able to leave because of the woods and spring fed cricks(creek).
If I were ever able to move again I would choose the Pacific NW. Preferable Whidbey Island which is where we last lived.

Jason


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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Tue 11, 2017 3:32 am 
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Location: Tennessee, USA
Since Gone with the Wind came out as a movie in 1940, Hollywood has never risen above a failing grade on impersonating a southern US accent or matching the dialect. Even Tom Hanks in Forest Gump failed it, badly.

Their efforts would be laughable, except that some of our classic movie lines (for example, "What we've got heah is a fail-yah to communicate" or "life is like a baugh-x of chaulk-lets") have left our culture stuck with the fake pronunciations.

Hollywood has taken what should have been normal for "X-word" and substituted a corrupted, artificial "Y-word" which has sadly become ingrained in our culture as being the normal.


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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Tue 11, 2017 3:43 am 
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Location: Annapolis, MD
In a state in the US of A.....
arriving at a gas station....

"Heidi, Yawl---how can i hep ya?"

"we just need a fill-up and check under the hood."

"Rat!!--I'll gas 'er up and check Walter and Earl."

<<time out while we visit the coffee recycling center>>

"Kay--yawler reddy to go---one yer tars was a bit low, so I aired it...yawl come back--hear!"

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Tue 11, 2017 4:20 am 
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Use of redundant quantities such as "all y'all" defines the real thing vs what all y'all see on Tv.
So, not just some of y'all.


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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Tue 11, 2017 1:06 pm 
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Quote:
people ask `Where y'at' when they mean Hello, (New Orleans/Houston)

and they eat ``city chicken'' (pork - usually cubed - Houston)


I grew up in Houston and never heard these terms used , must be a more East Texas , Louisiana thing.

Now everyone was "A Fixing to do something" ( getting ready to do something)

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Tue 11, 2017 1:52 pm 
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"taik uh rot ayt thuh lot an kape own gitt nit"

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Thu 13, 2017 8:34 pm 
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I think a big part of California and the Bay Area understanding out-of-area words and accents is that so many people here are from other states (and that includes me). So, I still drink pop here, and I wear gym shoes, and visit washrooms. My friends all understand this, and sometimes even say they are going out to eat and ask if I want to "come with"!

I do drive on freeways, though, and I know that an "expressway" is an intermediate-size, 45-50 MPH limit regional road with traffic lights every half mile or so typically.

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Thu 13, 2017 10:22 pm 
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Location: Gold Country, (Stanislaus National Forest) California 95235
ChrisW6ATV wrote:
My friends... say they are going out to eat and ask if I want to "come with"!
Which is why I say Appalachianese - whether Northern from the Steel Valley or Southern from the Coal Valley HAS to be the easiest accent to pick up by non-speakers AND the most widely disseminated.

I've lived with my ex-foster dad 12 years now. He's a disabled Vietnam veteran born raised and lived all his life in Long Beach/North Orange (except for Vietnam in the Navy for two years in the late 60s) and he started picking up my Appalachianisms and Inland-North-isms within three months of moving in with him.

He's had long term caregivers from Boston, Dallas, Orlando, Hattiesburg and Seattle - some for several years - and never picked up more than the odd Down-Easter Southern or Pacific Northwest words - and would certainly never use them himself on any more than a very occasional basis.

Over this past Christmas I had to take him home for a funeral for a relative of mine since the other resident here was going to be in the hospital for surgery so there was going to be nobody home to see to his needs (he's not eligible for homecare bec too high of an income but yet not high enough to pay for it out of pocket).

I get off the plane and my ex foster dad starts up a conversation with my Uncle Stan

Stan says

STAN: Jeet jet?

XFD: Well airz some nuts nat on nup plane

AUNT CISSY: That's no kind of food. You need to get some jin you wine Eat n Park inside that srawney frame o' yorn.

(XFD is 385 on 5 11 and I ain't that far behind)

We pass one and stop in.

STAN: You want city chicken or a chip-chop?

XFD: Chicken's fine. Get a lotta onions and dippy eggs.

We finish and are driving to the house.

STAN: Yinna stawp kneep lace else foree git todda haahs?

XFD: Kids gawt pawp?

STAN: Yeh

CISSY: Watch aaaht!

STAN: Christ! What kinda moneyshine ziss? Guy makes a Yinzer left from the left lane.

We get to the house and fix dinner. Afterward:

AUNT REGGIE: Yinna he'p redd up dis kitchen? Yer Aunt Ida n'me's gonna swip the reddin' room so's ya kin bunk in there.

[Reddin' room - a small closet like space usually under the stairs that may or may not have a small sink and toilet in - usually located near the front door of a house - so named because they can ``redd-up'' (put themselves together and do some last minute touch ups) before running out the front door (presumably on a date)]

I'm busy helping in said kitchen so XFD goes to help

AUNT REGGIE: Dowanna catch a draft in that cold attic (my old bedroom when I was little). Gwan warsh up under the spicket. Will lot a far later. Til then yinz kin crawl up under this here hap.

Inside of 20 minutes he had a worse Yinzer accent than people who'd lived there 60 years.
ChrisW6ATV wrote:
I think...so many people here are from other states...
But everybody in New York or Miami is also from everyplace else too - and you don't get NEAR the comprehension there as you get here for out of region words and phrases. Like I said - the Great American Melting Pot of L.A. has less than half the comprehension of the Bay Area.

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Fri 14, 2017 5:05 am 
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simplex1040 wrote:
Quote:
people ask `Where y'at' when they mean Hello, (New Orleans/Houston)

and they eat ``city chicken'' (pork - usually cubed - Houston)


I grew up in Houston and never heard these terms used , must be a more East Texas , Louisiana thing.

Now everyone was "A Fixing to do something" ( getting ready to do something)


City chicken is from the days (a chicken in every pot) when chicken was the most expensive meat. Soul food thing and I remember seeing it a lot in Detroit probably brought up from the South during the industrial migration. Delicious. Cubed pork on a skewer, breaded and deep fried. Looks a little bit like a drum stick.


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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Fri 14, 2017 6:11 am 
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Location: Charlotte, NC 28273
Some of this movement is from the population moving from the northeast to the south and west. Since manufacturing has left the northeast. The words you mention for mid south, VA, NC and SC, I heard in PA growing up.

When I move south in 1980s, I found many other "northerns". In the 1990s even more people moved to the south and west.

Just some thoughts, maybe not entirely right.

Bob


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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Fri 14, 2017 12:24 pm 
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Location: Milwaukee,WI
One thing that I thought at first was just a mistake of a few people was when they wrongly say something like " the porch needs painted" instead of "the porch needs painting" or "the porch needs to be painted". Or the radio needs restored. It seemed at first to be a midwestern thing. But as I started reading more posts here and elsewhere on the internet I'm finding that its way more common and widespread than I thought it would be. I'm wondering where they get this from. Its hard to imagine schools teaching such bad grammar. And most times this misuse of the phrase is contained in posts that seem to be grammatically correct in every other way.


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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Fri 14, 2017 2:19 pm 
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Being from the Pittsburgh area, I understand every word!

My mother used to make "city chicken". Her recipe was beef, pork, and veal cubes on a skewer; breaded and fried.

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Sat 15, 2017 4:54 am 
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Posts: 399
forumuser wrote:
One thing that I thought at first was just a mistake of a few people was when they wrongly say something like " the porch needs painted" instead of "the porch needs painting" or "the porch needs to be painted". Or the radio needs restored. It seemed at first to be a midwestern thing. But as I started reading more posts here and elsewhere on the internet I'm finding that its way more common and widespread than I thought it would be. I'm wondering where they get this from. Its hard to imagine schools teaching such bad grammar. And most times this misuse of the phrase is contained in posts that seem to be grammatically correct in every other way.


I agree. I see it everywhere. "Needs cleaned." It should be stamped out.


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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Sat 15, 2017 6:01 am 
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Location: Gold Country, (Stanislaus National Forest) California 95235
monroe wrote:
(words and phrases I heard later in other parts of the country) I heard in PA growing up.
which is in the Appalachians
forumuser wrote:
I'm finding that its way more common and widespread than I thought it would be.
Like I said:
ndiamone wrote:
Which is why I say Appalachianese - whether Northern from the Steel Valley or Southern from the Coal Valley HAS to be the easiest accent to pick up by non-speakers AND the most widely disseminated.
accounting for being the most widespread - even over the American Southeast accent which previously held the spot according to linguists - which was my original point of opening up the thread in the first place.

Meaning I gather from the opinions here that it should be no surpise that my Yinzer-filtered thru-Motown-Cheesehead-and-Chowderhead accent has more currency in more places than even Midland North (TV Broadcast English) and American Southeaat.
Jim Mueller wrote:
Radio, television, and movies can spread vocabularies and usages even to other countries so it isn't surprising that people understand them even if they don't use them themselves.
So it must be a whole lot more radio TV and movie shows I don't know about that feature the Appalachian accent other than just The Waltons for that to happen.

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Last edited by ndiamone on Apr Sat 15, 2017 6:12 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Unexpected Dialect Crossovers e.g SF to Appalachian
PostPosted: Apr Sat 15, 2017 6:09 am 
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Tim Tress wrote:
Being from the Pittsburgh area, I understand every word!

My mother used to make "city chicken". Her recipe was beef, pork, and veal cubes on a skewer; breaded and fried.


Tim, that's sounds so delicious!


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