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 Post subject: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 1:11 am 
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On all of these Alaskan reality shows, trapping is very important to their existence. And it looks like a lot of work. From checking their trap lines to skinning, tanning, etc. So why is it that really nice fur coats from the 60s and 70s are worth so little? I was at an auction today and there must have been at least 20 fur coats of all styles and types. Mink, fox, etc. I handled them and they were not mangey things with hair falling out. To me, they were in excellent condition. With tags from all the high end stores in my town. Full length mink-$75, half length fox-$40, etc. What don't I get here? Yes, I know that fur isn't as popular as it was, but who are these trappers selling their pelts to? Would those pelt buyers want these ones from today?


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 1:25 am 
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Wearing dead animals is unpopular now, as is the stylings of 50 years ago.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 1:55 am 
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No one wants to be caught wearing one of those coats in public now, despite how many thousands of dollars it costed when they were new. Trapping is a sport, there's no profit to be made.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 2:19 am 
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synthetic fur fabric is so beautiful, luxurious and low cost nowadays, that its not worth killing an animal to wear such stuff.

I suppose the Eskimo people of the far north value real pelts, but not popular anywhere else.

Just as its not fashionable to smoke either.

Killing for "sport" is despicable… Unless its lawyers. :lol:

-Steve

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 2:26 am 
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DKinYORKpa wrote:
What don't I get here? Yes, I know that fur isn't as popular as it was, but who are these trappers selling their pelts to? Would those pelt buyers want these ones from today?
The trappers are selling their furs to the same system that they always did .... the fur buyers who attend auctions at fur clearing houses a couple of times a year. As already said, furs are out of fashion due to pressure applied by special interest groups. The trappers don't make much these days. Some of my friends still trap, but they don;t make anywhere near what their parents did fifty years ago. For most it's a sideline now.

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 2:39 am 
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Location: Litchfield Minnesota USA
azenithnut wrote:

Killing for "sport" is despicable… Unless its lawyers. :lol:

-Steve

Yet everyone wears leather shoes that came from an animal and we eat animals that are killed in a slaughterhouse and all is just fine.
Today, while I was cutting down some dead ash trees (excellent firewood) there were quite a few shotgun blasts. It's deer season. From the number of shots, either they were getting lots of deer (thank goodness!! Way over populated around here) or they're mighty poor shots. It went on into the evening. These animals will be eaten, which is what they are there for, and deer hide from them will provide clothing for humans. Humans, if nobody has noticed, must wear something over their hides because they'll die if they don't... unless you are one of the un-contacted we read about in National Graphic in South America and some of the Pacific Islands.

I don't hunt deer. I don't like the meat and don't feel like making clothes out of bloody hide. So I eat pheasants, turkeys and ducks. Geese aren't my thing either.
I don't make clothes out of the feathers.

Mark D.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 2:42 am 
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Yep, sure that is fine.
We all need to eat, we all need to have shoes and bovine hide is good for that.
Deer hunting is needed because their natural predator, the wolf, has been all but eradicated from the continent.
Therefore population is out of control.

There are reasons to hunt, and reasons not to is all I'm saying.

-Steve

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 2:45 am 
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And I can truly say that we surely do NOT want to bring the wolf population back to what it was back in the 1800's and earlier.
Too many humans will be hunted down and eaten. No, I'm not kidding.

Mark D.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 2:55 am 
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:lol: if you say so!

I think the worry would be more of livestock which is why sheep guarding dogs were bread such as the Great Pyrenees to protect sheep from bears and wolves.
Humans aren't the target.

-Steve

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 3:56 am 
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Mark D wrote:
...Yet everyone wears leather shoes that came from an animal and we eat animals that are killed in a slaughterhouse and all is just fine.
Today, while I was cutting down some dead ash trees (excellent firewood) ...
Mark D.


Just a quick small hijack--victims of ash borer? The ash trees here in the mid-Atlantic (and everywhere but one part of North Carolina, go figure, are being ravaged by the damn things. I've lost at least a dozen just in the last year.

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 4:49 am 
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Back to the Ops question. Fur clothing is still popular in Russia and other countries not conflicted with feelings of guilt about utilizing the earth natural resources.

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 5:47 am 
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Location: North of Mpls, Minnesota
Leather jacket, leather gloves, leather boots, leather saddle bags, leather seat, and leather holster.

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 5:52 am 
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Leather is a by-product of our beef production. Mink and chinchilla are killed for they fur and the rest discarded. So it. Food AND clothing vs just high end designer clothing without the food part.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 1:53 pm 
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Many of the Alaska reality shows are bogus. They don't really need to kill that rabbit this afternoon or starve. At least on AK Wild frontier , there is a town nearby and some of the stars may have millions, for example Jewel's daddy. Jewel is worth $30 million USD.
The others are getting around a years average pay for most people per show.
There's always a cam crew around too. They're are not actually dirt sustenance farming or selling pelts to survive one more day.

One thing I don't understand is the lack of cheap available 2 way radios. They're always out in the wilderness , it's getting dark and cold, grizzlies, we're lost and starving, snowmobile broke. No radio. I guess just get the cam crew to call someone.
Some of them should order a cheap chainfall from Northern tool as well, rather than lifting trees by hand to build that cabin.
Wife likes it, only reason I'm familiar.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 2:38 pm 
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Location: Muscletown, USA
This link answers some of my questions: (I like the $1/hour wages)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/low ... -1.3461206


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 12, 2017 10:07 pm 
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Some guys get a bounty, like for a cougar that's killing sheep. Some of the furs like lynx probably go to Europe and Asia, to the filthy rich. It is to hang in the closet for that one special night. :roll:
Some of those people wouldn't last a month on their own in the bush.
Sat phones. The camera crew has them, bet your boots.
But some guys just carry a locator so their movements, or lack of it, can be tracked.

Those old coats originated from mink farms. They are stinky and old, like somebody's old mattress, yuk.

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Mon 13, 2017 2:16 am 
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azenithnut wrote:
:lol: if you say so!

I think the worry would be more of livestock which is why sheep guarding dogs were bread such as the Great Pyrenees to protect sheep from bears and wolves.
Humans aren't the target.

-Steve

Wolves WILL go after humans, and they have eaten humans in recent times. However, it's rare because they're wary of humans and humans aren't outside in vulnerable positions or locations as much as wild animals are. But if you are human and in the north woods of Minnesota (or Alaska - most recent incident I'm familiar with) and are running, or acting as though you are in distress and wolves sense you are there, you could be in serious trouble but won't know until it's too late.
That said, if the wolves were at a population similar to the 1800's people in areas of large wolf population there would be a lot more incidents of humans being wolf food. That's why we don't want the wolf population to grow too large. Back in the 1800's the population of humans in high wolf populations were far fewer and were always ready to shoot a wolf if it's seen. Today, you can't shoot them until they've eaten your left arm as proof of self defense. I'm exaggerating on that last statement, but not by a lot.

Mark D.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Mon 13, 2017 4:49 am 
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This guy, Todd Pilgrim, is up north somewhere hunting Bison. Shoots the bison, and the bison walks away. Pilgrim hunts down the bison. Bison runs him over and gives him a nasty gash in the head.

https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/vi ... 2149996001

I've got another story here, cougar takes down a deer right in front of the road hunter, then drags deer into the bush.
Attachment:
cougar--deer.jpg
cougar--deer.jpg [ 139.05 KiB | Viewed 601 times ]


Wolves in packs are pretty fearless. But even a lone wolf is trouble. I remember when dog-walkers were freaked out around here. A wolf jumped out and took the guy's little dog, right off the leash! I was sitting a friend's dog and she wouldn't sleep at night, always howling and crying because she could hear the wolves out there. Fish and Wildlife put out poison bait. They keep it all hushed up.
These days, it's mostly black bears that are a nuisance, but not out of control. I've got a pic of a big black bear patiently waiting at a stop sign for a chance to cross the highway.

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Mon 13, 2017 2:05 pm 
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Mark D wrote:
azenithnut wrote:
:lol: if you say so!

I think the worry would be more of livestock which is why sheep guarding dogs were bread such as the Great Pyrenees to protect sheep from bears and wolves.
Humans aren't the target.

-Steve

Wolves WILL go after humans, and they have eaten humans in recent times. However, it's rare because they're wary of humans and humans aren't outside in vulnerable positions or locations as much as wild animals are. But if you are human and in the north woods of Minnesota (or Alaska - most recent incident I'm familiar with) and are running, or acting as though you are in distress and wolves sense you are there, you could be in serious trouble but won't know until it's too late.
That said, if the wolves were at a population similar to the 1800's people in areas of large wolf population there would be a lot more incidents of humans being wolf food. That's why we don't want the wolf population to grow too large. Back in the 1800's the population of humans in high wolf populations were far fewer and were always ready to shoot a wolf if it's seen. Today, you can't shoot them until they've eaten your left arm as proof of self defense. I'm exaggerating on that last statement, but not by a lot.

Mark D.



Well, I guess the native American Indians were in a heap of trouble through their existence. It is a wonder they even existed at all. :lol:

Oh I'm sure it happens on rare occasion, but how many confirmed wolf attacks have been recorded through time?

-Steve

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Mon 13, 2017 2:25 pm 
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Alan Voorhees wrote:
Leather is a by-product of our beef production. Mink and chinchilla are killed for they fur and the rest discarded. So it. Food AND clothing vs just high end designer clothing without the food part.


I don't know what happens to wild mink carcasses. With commercially farmed mink, little is wasted. The carcasses are turned into pet food, refined oils, and organic fertilizer.

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