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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Mon 13, 2017 5:21 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 7315
Location: Litchfield Minnesota USA
azenithnut wrote:
Well, I guess the native American Indians were in a heap of trouble through their existence. It is a wonder they even existed at all. :lol:

Oh I'm sure it happens on rare occasion, but how many confirmed wolf attacks have been recorded through time?

-Steve


This is getting to be trivial, but let me ask you this; How many wives, children or husbands or single people need to be eaten by wolves before the wolf population is controlled?
I'm not saying that they are out of control at this time, but there are people who want to protect them without any limit of the size or number of packs. They don't seem to be at all concerned about humans or their livestock which is their livelihood.
The recent one in AK was a young (20's) school teacher in a small community (they're all small up there) who was out jogging one morning. She never returned to town, but searchers found myriad wolf tracks around human bones, a few human parts and torn clothing on the road just outside of town.

There have been a couple accounts in the news around here in the past few years documenting families living in rural areas in northern MN where pets and children were in imminent danger, but in these cases either the wolves were scared away by various means or a lone wolf was shot. Lone wolves aren't uncommon, usually having been drummed out of the pack for whatever reason that only wolves know. They are usually very hungry because it is difficult for a lone wolf to find food. It will then become more brave and will attack humans or their livestock without fear.
My last comment on this.

I apologize for the topic drift.

Mark D.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Mon 13, 2017 6:38 pm 
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Location: Dayton Ohio
Well, as far as off topic, this will be my last comment on the issue.

Since 1997, I have been involved (on and off) with Wolf Park near Lafayette Indiana.
They are a wolf research and education center.
I've learned quite a bit about the animals and have interacted with them on a couple occasions.

While wolf attacks do happen, its not very common. A healthy wolf will not attack a human. Rabies and other factors, such as a wolf kept as a pet which escaped (yes this happens often) and is unafraid of humans will attack.

Better be more worried about being killed in an auto accident than by wolves, even if they were more populous.
Sadly, their habitat has been decimated in North America and the population will never be what it once was.
It is quite sad really.

Here is some info. I will no longer take the thread off topic.

http://wolf.org/wp-content/uploads/2013 ... Humans.pdf
http://wolfpark.org/animals/info/wolves/

-Steve

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Mon 13, 2017 7:36 pm 
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Location: Columbus Ohio
azenithnut wrote:
Mark D wrote:
azenithnut wrote:
:lol: if you say so!

I think the worry would be more of livestock which is why sheep guarding dogs were bread such as the Great Pyrenees to protect sheep from bears and wolves.
Humans aren't the target.

-Steve

but how many confirmed wolf attacks have been recorded through time?

-Steve


That has to be impossible to count, 6000 people go missing in Alaska alone every year, add other states in and what
10,000? people a year 'disappear", where do they go? I'm sure more than few go into the woods and hills
and that is the last anyone will ever see them. Bears, wolves, crazy hillbilly's, something happens.
Can't count a stat if you don't know it even happened.

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Mon 13, 2017 9:07 pm 
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Joined: Feb Sun 17, 2008 11:36 pm
Posts: 1909
Location: Dayton, Ohio
I don't hunt anymore.

I am amused, watching squirrels frolicking around the neighbor's yards, while I am sitting on my porch in the summertime.

But it don't matter if I, or others, hunt or not, all animals will die, hunted or not. There is, I figure, three ways an animal in the wild can die; death by starvation, disease or misadventure. None of them pleasant.

Charlie


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Tue 14, 2017 12:00 am 
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Location: Vancouver Island, Canada
Wolves will take a cat or a dog, but what about a toddler out in the backyard? Just saying, parents, watch your kids.
Wolves are hunted from helicopters sometimes. But poison bait is discrete and cheap. That is the reality we don't see on mainstream TV.
I lived on a large island where wolves and bears roamed the north end while civilization occupied the south end. If wolves came south, Fish and Wildlife would come over to quietly deal with them.

Cougars would be treed with hounds, tranquilized and relocated. But the latest word is that relocation hasn't worked out, because they can travel great distances in a short time, and they are not welcomed when dropped off in the bush, another cat's territory. So the new policy is to drive them away and if they don't run, they are shot.

In the 1930's and maybe before, a source of income was the government bounty on cougars. I have a picture of a young lad with his hound, his rifle and two big cats draped over his Indian motorcycle like saddlebags.

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Last edited by westcoastjohn on Nov Tue 14, 2017 1:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Tue 14, 2017 12:40 am 
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Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
Mark D wrote:
azenithnut wrote:

Killing for "sport" is despicable… Unless its lawyers. :lol:

-Steve

Yet everyone wears leather shoes that came from an animal and we eat animals that are killed in a slaughterhouse and all is just fine.
Today, while I was cutting down some dead ash trees (excellent firewood) there were quite a few shotgun blasts. It's deer season. From the number of shots, either they were getting lots of deer (thank goodness!! Way over populated around here) or they're mighty poor shots. It went on into the evening. These animals will be eaten, which is what they are there for, and deer hide from them will provide clothing for humans. Humans, if nobody has noticed, must wear something over their hides because they'll die if they don't... unless you are one of the un-contacted we read about in National Graphic in South America and some of the Pacific Islands.

I don't hunt deer. I don't like the meat and don't feel like making clothes out of bloody hide. So I eat pheasants, turkeys and ducks. Geese aren't my thing either.
I don't make clothes out of the feathers.

Mark D.

Leather goods come from animals like cows that we cultivate and farm raise for food as well.
Even mink and ermine are farm raised... but real animal fur is no longer in fashion.

There's and old saying: If you want to save an animal from extinction ... start eating it. Then it will be cultivated and farm raised to over abundance.

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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Nov Wed 15, 2017 3:27 am 
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Joined: Mar Wed 16, 2011 10:44 pm
Posts: 560
Location: Peekskill, NY
"Wolves will take a cat or a dog, but what about a toddler out in the backyard?"

Sounds rather brutal but the darn wolf will just have to take his chances when dealing with the
four year-old, same as the poor folks on that airline flight with toddlers on board.

People do trap for fur and for food. My dad worked at a place where the employee cafeteria
was run by the outfit. One day one of the men there was eating the stew, and stopped to
inspect a bone in it.

"This isn't chicken" he said. "This is muskrat."

This was at the American Museum of Natual History in NY, and the man inspecting his lunch
was a mammologist, in fact an expert in muskrats. The cook had take the money he had been
given to buy supplies, and instead had used animals he trapped to provide the meat. He
accidentally served the result to the one man in a thousand mile radius who could positively
identify the species instantly.

True story.


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 Post subject: Re: Fur trapping question
PostPosted: Dec Tue 05, 2017 2:19 am 
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Joined: Jul Fri 10, 2009 10:13 pm
Posts: 594
Location: Weymouth,Massachusetts
I was able to contact Stan Zuray (Yukom Man) and here is his answer to the OP's original question as to who the buyers are for the furs they trap. I mentioned his name only with his permission.
Henry

Henry
There are local buyers that buy trappers fur all over the US and some have special markets (furriers, clothing companies, etc. ) they sell to direct but most local buyers resell to the big auction houses in Canada. I also sell mostly to auction houses but others who need the money immediately will just sell to the local buyers at a lesser amount of course. Two countries dominate the buying in Canada and that is Russia and China. The anti hunting/trapping/fishing groups have pretty much destroyed the fur trade as a viable way of making a living in most places. The economic situation in Russia and China lately has made for even more poor fur prices. Best sable fur comes from Alaska and Canada so we can still make some money and of course using the wolf and wolverine fur ourselves make it still worth it to trap. Stan


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