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 Post subject: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Thu 08, 2018 2:26 am 
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BACKGROUND: I studied up on the best lubricant for the sear of my Crosman 766 pellet rifle. The factory sear had rough edges where it contacts the piston that opens the air valve. I polished both surfaces with 1500 grit and crocus cloth. It made a noticeable difference, a smoother and seemingly shorter trigger pull. But still, it's metal-to-metal, the mechanism one piece of metal rubbing transversely under pressure against another. I'm wondering if a tiny amount of the right lubricant would improve the trigger pull further.

Reading on the forums about different greases, lithium, moly, PTFE, graphite, etc. I hit on Moly because of this:

Quote:
Several different molecules make up the hexagonal crystal platelets of moly. There is one molybdenum atom and two sulfur atoms in each molecule of moly. What makes moly platelets special is their affinity to metal surfaces. The combination of this affinity, especially when considering how moving parts, when sliding around, can cause the thermochemical reaction that is required for moly to provide its armor-like overlapping coating of protection to engine parts.

Moly platelets have the characteristic of being able to slide across engine surfaces quite easily. This allows metal to rub against metal while being protected by the lubricating properties of moly grease.


I got my oil changed today and asked the dealer for a dab of moly lubricant. They were nice about it and gave me a dab of brownish black grease, so I hope it's the right stuff.

But PTFE is supposed to be slippery, too. And graphite, which is dry. Any thoughts?


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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Thu 08, 2018 2:38 am 
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Molybdenum Disulfide grease is what they use in CV joints of cars. It sticks well on metal to metal parts.

Strange is they supplied it for the mode cam of Zenith VCRs made by JVC.
The cam is made of plastic.

-Steve

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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Thu 08, 2018 2:48 am 
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Graphite fell out of favor in recent decades, with moly (molybdenum disulfide) being preferred.

Graphite lubricant exists as pancakes. As long as the pancakes are all on the same plane, they slide against each other, which is the lubrication.

The problem is that sometimes the pancakes stand up on edge. When that happens, they form an extremely powerful abrasive.

Moly exists as round blobs, so no sharp edges. They roll like ball bearings.

- Leigh

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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Thu 08, 2018 4:18 am 
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Greetings to the Forum:

Just a side note on MOS2 grease:

Back when KCBS had BT-18 tube-type TV transmitters, the PA's were double-tuned with resonant cavities. These cavities had sliding shorts in them, each of which was attached to a three-legged spider. The spider legs extended out through three longitudinal slots milled in the sides of the cylindrical cavities 120 degrees apart. Each spider leg had a threaded rod that went through matching threads tapped in the leg. When the threaded rods turned, the sliding short was driven up and down in the cavity, thus tuning it. The threaded rods were linked together by miniature bicycle chains driving sprockets on their bottom ends. One sprocket was a master that had a bevel gear that went through a shaft at right angles to the cavities (they were oriented vertically, so the shaft was horizontal) and thus extended out through the front panel of the transmitter to a crank knob to allow the cavity to be tuned.

This whole mess was filled with needle roller bearings, sprockets and gears. They were originally lubricated with Lubriplate white grease, which turned into the most insoluble and stubborn glue I have ever encountered. We had to rebuild all the cavity drive systems... a somewhat laborious process, especially since the only to clean the old glue/grease out of the needle bearings was to disassemble the bearings themselves and scrape each individual needle with one's fingernail to get the crud off.

I personally did not want to go through a repeat of this procedure, but my boss was a fan of Lubriplate and wanted to re-use it. He was especially concerned that since moly grease is Molybdenum Di-Sulfide that the sulphur in the grease would attack the silver components in the system (the sliding shorts, finger stock and the cavities themselves).

To convince him, I did a test where I carefully painted different types of greases including 2 or 3 molly greases on different segments of a filament contact for one of the 8807 tubes used in the transmitter. I put this aside for some months and then wrote up the results.

I don't think I have them any more, but only one or two of the greases reacted in any way with the silver plate and none of them was moly.

So, if you have any concerns about using moly grease near a silver-plated RF assembly, rest assured... the sulphur is too tightly bound to the molybdenum to get loose and attack the silver. Moly grease is just fine for use on or near silver plated parts.

Regards,

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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Thu 08, 2018 8:27 pm 
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Location: Howell Michigan
https://www.drislide.com/

Liquid Moly lube that dries to a film. I first heard of this stuff in the late 60's as motorcycle cable and chain lube. It made sense especially when you compared this to the other chain lubes of the day that sprayed on and left a sticky residue that attracted sand and road grime, especially when we raced off road. I had a chain on a British bike last for 16k that I used Dri-Slide on from day one and that chain went through some abuse mainly on the road but once in awhile a off road foray or two.

This was the same lube that the U.S. Armed Forces specified for use with M-16's, especially the ones made by GM Hydramatic Division that were prone to jamming during their use in Vietnam, again with dirt and sand fouling up the bolt carrier and trigger. It was about the same time frame that I read of the problems associated with the mil-spec lube of that era and the research into later approval of Dri-Slide for battlefield use.


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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Fri 09, 2018 3:48 am 
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My, what a difference the moly grease makes. Buttery smooth trigger pull. Thanks for all the comments. Always helpful this forum is.


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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Fri 09, 2018 4:26 am 
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SHOVELHEAD TOO wrote:
https://www.drislide.com/

This was the same lube that the U.S. Armed Forces specified for use with M-16's, especially the ones made by GM Hydramatic Division that were prone to jamming during their use in Vietnam, again with dirt and sand fouling up the bolt carrier and trigger. It was about the same time frame that I read of the problems associated with the mil-spec lube of that era and the research into later approval of Dri-Slide for battlefield use.


In 1969-70 Vietnam we used LSA (Lubricant, Small Arms) So there was something better?
Now I'm mad.
Image


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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Fri 09, 2018 4:47 am 
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Mike Toon wrote:
In 1969-70 Vietnam we used LSA (Lubricant, Small Arms) So there was something better?

You have to worry about any lubricant that says "SHAKE WELL".

Lubricants are not supposed to separate under any conditions.

- Leigh

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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Fri 09, 2018 5:13 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Mpls, Minnesota
LSA is a petroleum-based lubricant mixed with a combination detergent, oxidation inhibitor, and corrosion inhibitors. It’s still used by gun owners, and it can most easily be found in surplus stores.
http://surplustodayonline.com/2012/10/2 ... t-gun-oil/


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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Mon 12, 2018 3:57 am 
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Joined: Nov Fri 14, 2014 12:22 am
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Location: Howell Michigan
Mike Toon wrote:
SHOVELHEAD TOO wrote:
https://www.drislide.com/

This was the same lube that the U.S. Armed Forces specified for use with M-16's, especially the ones made by GM Hydramatic Division that were prone to jamming during their use in Vietnam, again with dirt and sand fouling up the bolt carrier and trigger. It was about the same time frame that I read of the problems associated with the mil-spec lube of that era and the research into later approval of Dri-Slide for battlefield use.


In 1969-70 Vietnam we used LSA (Lubricant, Small Arms) So there was something better?
Now I'm mad.
[img]http://go-armynavy.com/images/stories/virtuemart/product/3187B.jpg[/i

Sorry, I forgot about LSA. Here is an article albeit a bit long about Vietnam era lubricants.
https://www.cherrybalmz.com/history-vietnam-and-the-great-disconnect


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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Wed 14, 2018 12:31 am 
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I use this for all my firearm grease applications. It works well with alloy components and stainless steel. I use Mobil 1 motor oil for oiling. And this for grease.

https://www.harborfreight.com/85-gram-s ... 93744.html

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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Wed 14, 2018 3:05 am 
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19&41 wrote:
I use this for all my firearm grease applications. It works well with alloy components and stainless steel. I use Mobil 1 motor oil for oiling. And this for grease.

https://www.harborfreight.com/85-gram-s ... 93744.html


I'm glad you posted that! That's exactly what i was going to get if my auto dealership hadn't given me a dab of moly grease.


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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Wed 14, 2018 7:59 am 
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19&41 wrote:
I use this for all my firearm grease applications. It works well with alloy components and stainless steel. I use Mobil 1 motor oil for oiling. And this for grease.

https://www.harborfreight.com/85-gram-s ... 93744.html



I wonder if that's the same stuff as Sil-Glyde? https://www.amazon.com/AGS-SG8-Lubricant/dp/B000KXLR5E

I use this stuff for brake hardware and spark plug boots.


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 Post subject: Re: Moly grease, et.al.
PostPosted: Mar Wed 14, 2018 11:16 am 
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Super Lube is a synthetic lubricant. Many neoprene rubber seals, etc. will actually absorb it and keep it as new. I have used it for everything from motorcycle chains to putting preservative coatings on my firearms. Sil Glyde is a silicone grease.

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