Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives :: Books
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Jul Thu 20, 2017 9:40 pm


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: The Day the (Country) Music Died 54th Anniversary
PostPosted: Mar Sun 05, 2017 7:14 pm 
Member

Joined: Feb Mon 06, 2012 7:24 pm
Posts: 2015
Location: Beautiful Gold Country California
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJfPZWcXRGI
Patsy Cline, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l6R2eqiMXsY
Hawkshaw Hawkins https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q43IOlGzrcM
and Cowboy Copas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qmDYchDxBvw
were all killed along with pilot and concert promoter/guitarist Randy Hughes
https://youtu.be/5_H-jsxuklE 54 years ago today coming back from a benefit in Kansas City to help for final expenses with the sudden death of KCMK DJ Cactus Jack who'd been killed in a car wreck six weeks earlier.

Other tragedies surrounding the plane crash: Jack Anglin of Johnny and Jack fame https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hz7W0bugft8 had gone to get a haircut and was on his way back to the funeral when he rounded a corner too fast on the slick wet pavement and slammed his car into a tree, dying on the spot.

Sleepy McDaniel, bassist from the Rainbow Ranch Boys featuring Hank Snow and also formerly of his own Radio Playboys Band also died in a car crash due to having a heart attack behind the wheel. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNRXrC4a4aA

Three weeks later after what would also become her last recording session Texas Ruby https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BQrpaPBMLrg fell asleep in her trailer with a lit cigarette and died in the ensuing fire.

_________________
2 kinds of men/tape. Low Noise/Wide Range.
LN=kind. WR=abrasive. Engineers=same thing.


Last edited by ndiamone on Apr Wed 19, 2017 6:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Day the (Country) Music Died 54th Anniversary
PostPosted: Apr Tue 18, 2017 4:49 pm 
New Member

Joined: Mar Wed 22, 2017 3:54 pm
Posts: 8
was so shocked when read the story. so many sad events in a row. rest in peace


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Day the (Country) Music Died 54th Anniversary
PostPosted: Apr Wed 19, 2017 8:40 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 24529
Location: SoCal, 91387
Patsy Cline was like Hank Williams; just orders above any other country singer.

Can't believe 1963 was 54 years ago...

_________________
\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\He Who Dies With The Most Radios Wins//////////////////


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Day the (Country) Music Died 54th Anniversary
PostPosted: Apr Wed 19, 2017 1:13 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Mon 26, 2010 8:30 pm
Posts: 19307
Location: Annapolis, MD
+1

How many of today's teens and tweens know who Patsy Cline was?

Remember when 1984 was way in the (scary) future? Must watch that movie again......

_________________
-Mark http://pixellany.com

"It's always something". --Gilda Radner (1946 - 1989)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Day the (Country) Music Died 54th Anniversary
PostPosted: Apr Wed 19, 2017 3:49 pm 
Member

Joined: Feb Mon 06, 2012 7:24 pm
Posts: 2015
Location: Beautiful Gold Country California
fifties wrote:
Patsy Cline was like Hank Williams; just orders above any other country singer.
And more than a few pop singers too.
pixellany wrote:
How many of today's teens and tweens know who Patsy Cline was?
On one hand - maybe not too many. (scoffing) Kids anymore have trouble remembering who Reba McEntire is - and SHE'S still alive under all that makeup and tight red dress that was worn the wrong way around. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3_cYFMjfDqk.

Dunno what all the big stink was about though - she has more coverage in that dress than lots of girls today (and more than a few boys) have in their everyday clothes nevermind in a gown or tux.

But on the other hand with kids rediscovering their grampa's turntables and vinyl collections and lots of vinyl masters never having been transferred to CD yet - maybe there's more than that.

I'm continually amazed at the number of younger guys - and even more and more girls anymore - exploring vinyl on lots of classic artists they never heard of.

My ``little'' niece - now 25 and with 2 kids of her own was always a big girl - and consequently was forever getting in people's faces over it and getting suspended from school and jobs and etc.

Having had enough of this, her mother my sister Allie sat her down one day and made her watch Make Your Own Kind of Music: The Cass Elliot Story on PBS and all of a sudden she started wanting to know more about all the other in-your-face women singers who also didn't take the world lying down either.

She got into Loretta Lynn after that from having problems with her boyfriend at the time and father of her children, and then got into Dottie West, Tanya Tucker and a whole lot of other trailblazers before she heard that all THOSE gals were all inspired by Patsy.

As I see it - even if the kid first runs across vinyl of people that never had their music released on CD yet to whet their appetite for it - sooner or later they're going to run across this and other similar music they never heard of in a vinyl bin someplace for 99 cents - find out you can download it - and then go back to the vinyl for the retro sound of the medium.

Around the same time, that happened to my three little nephews (cousins of aforementioned niece) 8 11 and 13 yrs old trawling around their father's vinyl after he passed in the Iraq War.

My sister Joanie (having grown up around all boys and picked it up by osmosis) set up the component system, taught them how to use the turntable and after a couple mos on trash vinyl and accidentally breaking off a stylus or two they are now enjoying music directly off the LP.

Where they both instantaneously became OCD about who touches their vinyl and how it is handled and stored - making their mothers laugh about `if they paid this much attn to their chores and schoolwork' etc speech we have all heard a million times before when we were growing up.

Getting annoyed at not being able to take the records and huge players with them outside, at first they wanted to record music off the vinyl and play it on their phones - but the 13 yr old especially and the 11 yr old just beginning to notice - just kept frowning everytime he'd try and listen to his phone vs the big component set.

They wanted to know if there was any way to play vinyl outside the house and she came up with this huge battery-or-AC operated Sharp double-sided turntable with a handle. They played DJ at a couple friends parties like that for awhile and then resigned themselves to the fact that good recorded music on good players and portability are mutually exclusive.

Now the 13 year old Steve has a girlfriend Dana he turned on to classic country. Joanie and Dana's mother Lacey were both thrilled because a couple weeks earlier her little sister Sheana (pronounced Shayna) nine years old came home from school one day singing Wanna Pop My Cherry, Larry and my little 11 year old nephew Paul came home one day singing Gimme Datt Nutt (track only) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1GG6T1aHEA

Lacey caught the little ones singing this trash in the car one afternoon being picked up from school and calls my sister complaining `What happened to the days when `being in the throes of passion' meant Walkin' My Baby Back Home https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtDrlbYKRTw I Wanna Hold Your Hand https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VvjSjcCskbQ or It's In His Kiss https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4L7WTpxcPfQ ?

Which is funny because HER mother used to give HER that same speech when SHE was little talking about the Beatles and Betty Everett and substituting Dancing in the Dark and Under the Bamboo Tree.

About a week later Stevie and Dana were bellowing out some kind of country music or other going down the hallway after school one day thinking nobody was around, the music dance and drama coach caught them in the act and chose them both for the Spring Variety Show they have every year to raise money for the school.

He's playing Jim Reeves and she's playing Patsy Cline in a revue featuring many of their hits - including both ``digital'' duets I Fall to Pieces https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXOB1mkywyw and the better-known (especially in karaoke bars) Have You Ever Been Lonely https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rL4magM-cL0

For the unfamiliar, these were both recorded in the early days of stereo on 3 track tape, so that meant they could isolate the vocals, fly them over to a new tape and re-record new backing tracks with a more updated sound.

They had a problem though. Patsy sang the songs a half-tone higher than Jim, so even if they were the same song, they couldn't just fly over her vocal on top of his and go on about their business.

Instead they had to fly his over to the new master tape untouched and then varispeed her vocal down to match his in the days before widespread use of digital in 1981. In order to sync up the timing which would have been disturbed by that process anyway, they had to take the best of something like 50 passes and then make that the master.

After that, they found out that not even the title line of the song would sync THAT well no matter HOW many takes were tried - so they decided to just stick with that little bit for the duet and then trade off lines for the rest of the song.

The other problem they had was the fact that both Jim AND Patsy modulate the song and change the arrangement a little bit on the second half the song - so instead of using the whole song, they just traded some of the vocal parts from the first half and use that for the second half (i.e. in the first half she sings a line but he sings the same line in the second half etc) and rewrite the arrangement to have the finale/coda performed by the band instead.

As far as the cheesy Band-in-the-Box arrangement and performance they used - as they say it Needs a Lot of Help - but hey - they both charted in 1981 so I guess they didn't do TOO bad. Probably today somebody could get ahold of their isolated vocals from the multi-channel SACDs or DVD-As of the songs and with digital technology lay in a better background - but nobody's done it as of yet so this is what we got.

My own introduction to classic country isn't nearly so inspiring.

As everybody knows by now, two of my uncles were news correspondents from the late 50's thru the early 70's, the Philippines, India, South Africa and Argentina being frequent stops.

For the unfamiliar, those countries were among the last to manufacture 78 RPM records, some up until 1964-5. So since bringing things home from these other countries was paid for by the newspaper, and with 78's by then frequently being in blowout sales, everytime they went, they picked up as many as they could and brought `em back for us kids.

Two in particular that my brothers and I wore out was Big Bad John by Jimmy Dean on a South African 78 like the one here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXIXsmrOuQY and Crazy by Patsy Cine on a Filipino 78 like the one seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ernTG8GPORQ

Since all those countries preferred country music on 78 we all had a lot bigger exposure to that than pop. By then we were living in the various Canadian border states (Maine Michigan Minnesota etc) where it was easy to cross the border and pick up records.

Although it was the late 60s by then, Canadian record stores were still blowing out their 78's - especially country 78's sometimes as cheap as 10 or 20 for a dollar. So we ended up getting into a whole lot of `tragedy' artists whose careers were cut short in crashes of one kind or another like the aforementioned Hank Williams and Johnny Horton https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6y1S7D-HVXQ

Which was a problem growing up outside of Detroit where we were getting made fun of for listening to all this ``square'' ``cornpone'' and ``hick'' music while all the other kids were listening to Motown and psychedelic and all kinds of other types of progressive music.

But you know what they say - what goes around comes around - and eventually most of them - like my nieces and nephews - came around to at least APPRECIATE this kind of ``roots music'' even if they didn't exactly like it.

So that was nice.

_________________
2 kinds of men/tape. Low Noise/Wide Range.
LN=kind. WR=abrasive. Engineers=same thing.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Day the (Country) Music Died 54th Anniversary
PostPosted: May Tue 16, 2017 1:56 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1427
Location: Townsend, Ma.
I think it really died when Hank Williams died.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: The Day the (Country) Music Died 54th Anniversary
PostPosted: Jun Wed 07, 2017 8:15 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Aug Fri 09, 2013 1:01 am
Posts: 384
Location: Mount Arlington, NJ 07856
Quote:
I'm continually amazed at the number of younger guys - and even more and more girls anymore - exploring vinyl on lots of classic artists they never heard of.

I was in a used CD store a while back in the mall nearby. The guy sells used records as well as some newer 180gram records. I took notice that all the folks in there were relatively young (late teens, early 20's I'd guess) and they were not looking at the CD's! I think its about time they start realizing what they are missing. People look at me like I'm crazy because I refuse to listen to MP3's. Just hurts my ears! I'd rather have the clicks and pops than all that distortion.

As far as discovering classics, I too have found myself delving back to the 20's and up through 40's after I restored a 78RPM record player. Stuff my parents listened to that I wouldn't dare listen to when I was growing up in the 70's. It just wasn't cool! Well, I now get it. Big band music was the "heavy metal" in it's days. Some of the older Jazz records I'm finding, like Wingy Manone was some really kick ?ss stuff!

Back in the late 70's and early 80's, my friends dad always had the country station on. We took a liking to many of the songs. About 10 years ago I started switching from rock (basically not much new good anymore) to country (modern country like Kenny Chesney and Miranda Lambert.) It was basically rock. Not like he old time stuff but I liked it. Now, it's all going pop so I no longer listen to it much. I suspect the generation before me didn't like when it went rock. Times continue to change I guess. But most music these days seems to be going by way of the computer. It's just not for me.


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  




















Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB