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 Post subject: Vinyl Pressing Question Pre 1971
PostPosted: Sep Fri 07, 2018 2:27 am 
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Joined: Jan Tue 22, 2013 5:49 am
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Location: Los Angeles, CA
My favorite topic of the day. The vinyl pressing pre 1971. A lot of people don’t understand that the technology of record pressing has changed a lot over the years. I have an album that I want to press on vinyl but want to be able to play it on my old consoles with original cartridges. I prefer vinyl pressings before 1971 because the sound is in the groove, not on the surface. That means that surface scratches etc. won’t be heard with the older consoles. It’s amazing really. The record looks beat to crap and it plays great. The newer pressings always develop pops on the lp and it is very crappy to hear that loud pop. (I use a modern turntable with 2g magnetic cartridge for these records) I don’t know why the modern pressings are so bad. I never feel like buying new records because they always develop a pop after playing. Records that are 60 years old don’t have pops after playing over and over.

...And so, my question
Is there a record pressing company that specializes in older pressing technology pre 1971? I want to have a vinyl that will sound good for a long time.

Any help would be great. Thanks!


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 Post subject: Re: Vinyl Pressing Question Pre 1971
PostPosted: Sep Fri 07, 2018 3:28 am 
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Joined: Sep Mon 16, 2013 2:42 am
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Location: Tucson, Arizona U.S.A.
It may not be the pressing that is the problem. If the masters aren't made right the pressings won't be good either. Be sure to check out the mastering companies as well.

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 Post subject: Re: Vinyl Pressing Question Pre 1971
PostPosted: Sep Fri 07, 2018 4:24 am 
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Joined: Feb Mon 06, 2012 7:24 pm
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Location: Gold Country, (Stanislaus National Forest) California 95235
To get an idea of how and/or why they cut 60s style in the modern world - (well 1985 anyway) get a normal release copy of Sweet Dreams: The Patsy Cline Story soundtrack https://www.ebay.com/itm/153163705166 and then get an RCA Record Club edition https://www.ebay.com/itm/163235569876 and then find a vintage 1967 pressing of her Greatest Hits which contains almost all the same songs (in their original incarnations) https://www.ebay.com/itm/352412036083

Try and play all three on your old beater platter from the 60's. The period Decca will play perfectly but the MCA will barely track if it tracks at all. The RCA however could play straight through even while there's a sock hop going on in your living room just like the Decca.

Then after that - if you want to hear the kind of performance you are looking for on a modern LP - get a copy of both the audiophile 33 edition https://www.ebay.com/itm/142722018897
as well as the two-disc audiophile 45 edition https://www.ebay.com/itm/173506797354 and see what you think.

In the case of the RCA edition, this is due in part to the fact that - apart from the release copy being variable pitch and variable depth and the RCA edition being fixed pitch and close to fixed depth like they did in those days - the release version has the then- common 60-70 micron cut and the record club edition is closer to the 80-90 micron cut used by a lot of the great late-50's and early-60's stereo demo records, which is repeated on the 2013 33 edition and the 2015 45 edition..

Depth of cut is a major problem trying to play records from the mid-70s through the 90s on a classic turntable i.e. found in a mid century console. Couple that with a lot of modern records being cut several dB higher than their classic counterparts means that a lot of modern LPS will overdrive either the vintage ceramic or magnetic cartridge or the amplifier system coupled therewith.

Apart from the audiophile pressings that often use the same techniques - there's millions of modern records that won't track at all on a classic system even with a new stylus and new/NOS cartridge and the correct tracking weight - it will still jump all over the place and sound crappy during the brief periods where it stays put.

But no regular man in his right mind is going to waste a $75 audiophile LP on a classic system.

But if he wants to cut it specially for the purpose and kind of do a hybrid disc - the last man that still has the gear to cut that kind of deep-groove and/or fixed-pitch LP you are talking about is Len Horowitz half-designer of the famous Westrex 3DH cutterhead (shared with late Westrex engineer and designer Otto Hepp)

https://www.historyofrecordedsounds.com

As far as pressing plants, you are probably going to need somebody that regularly does heavy pressings >135 grams - the norm can be as low as 90 or even 70 - the latter of which is the amount of vinyl used to press a 7 inch 45 in the 50s.

RTI pressed almost all of the audiophile records over the past 60 years - with clients like Nautilus, Mobile Fidelity and CBS for Half-Speed Mastered titles - and Decca Custom, Capitol Creative and Elektra Essence for their Super45Sonic series heading the list.

http://recordtech.com

A lot of those are pressed on QUIEX and/or Japanese CD-4 vinyl for extra quiet and extra rugged surfaces - or on 180/200 Gm grainless dye for the best sound.

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2 kinds of men/tape. Low Noise/Wide Range.
LN=kind. WR=abrasive. Engineers=same thing.


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 Post subject: Re: Vinyl Pressing Question Pre 1971
PostPosted: Sep Thu 13, 2018 9:08 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Mobile Fidelity makes some awesome pressings.

Not sure about the audio engineering of these guys, but they would no doubt be able to answer your questions:
https://thirdmanpressing.com/about

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I don't believe in experts. That's why I take my car to a plumber and my taxes to a chef.


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 Post subject: Re: Vinyl Pressing Question Pre 1971
PostPosted: Sep Fri 14, 2018 7:35 pm 
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Joined: Jul Sat 15, 2006 3:54 am
Posts: 3434
Location: Zeeland MI
Interesting write up on pressings. I do not play any LPs on anything older than my 70s Kenwood. Even my 50s mono records. I do have a nice Garrard that I may use for my 50s LPs, as soon as my new audio room is finished. I play only 78s on my 40s and earlier players.
RW

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"Hear all; trust nothing."- Ferengi Rules of Acquisition #190


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