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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Fri 23, 2018 9:31 pm 
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Joined: May Fri 29, 2009 4:35 am
Posts: 2071
Location: Chicago, IL USA
You could get a basic tester like a B&K 440 cheap. It will also tell you if you have shorts in addition to emission. Very basic circuit inside and esy to repair is needed.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Fri 23, 2018 9:31 pm 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
I may wind up doing both if I can find a good deal. If anyone is looking online for that sort of thing, shoot me a link if you see a deal to be had.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Fri 23, 2018 9:35 pm 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
thanks bandersen, I just made an offer for one untested on ebay. Looks like it has everything there.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Fri 23, 2018 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5353
Location: Woodinville, WA USA
If you're only going to test one CRT -- perhaps in your lifetime -- then buying a CRT tester (which may itself need restoration) or building one from scratch seems like overkill. Why don't you ask an area radio/TV collector club if someone there can help? Maybe you can borrow someone's tester, or bring your tube to him for testing. Here's a list of clubs:

http://antiqueradio.com/clublist.html

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
https://antiqueradio.org/index.html


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Fri 23, 2018 9:54 pm 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
Phil, I would love to do that. Unfortunately no one on that list lives in my state and it would cost more in gas to bring it to the nearest one than it would to buy one on the internet.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Sat 24, 2018 12:24 am 
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Joined: May Thu 14, 2015 4:15 pm
Posts: 1076
Location: Dallas, TX
dandypanty wrote:
. It doesn’t look as daunting underneath as I imagined.


We will remind you later that you said that.
BTW, good job on the cabinet, as I said mine mostly isn't real wood.
A couple of thing I should mention, before its too late.
Plastic parts this old break very easily. When you want to remove the CRT socket for the first time it is a good idea to use a small screwdriver or similar to gently pry between the socket and the tube base. Be careful not to pull the tube base from the CRT, the cement sometimes deteriorates.
As careful as I am when I went to remove the top cap connector from the HV rectifier, I must of pulled
on the wire that goes to the flyback. The wire is held to the flyback by the wax around the winding. The wax had gotten brittle and broke off the flyback such that the wire was loose. The very tiny wire winding luckily didn't break however, so that was good. I might try to remelt the wax pieces that came off and re-attach the wire and recover the winding with silicone rubber.
Also I hope you realize that back in 1953 people watched TV in a darkened room and this was when the CRT was new. The CRT wasn't nearly as bright as tubes from 1963 for instance. So if a CRT tests a little weak, many times you just have to live with it since they are so scarce.

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Tim
It's not the Destination, It's the Journey.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Sat 24, 2018 1:32 am 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
thanks brother! I made a short hyperlapse video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MA9gdhQ80ug of the cabinet work. About 10 hours in total. Still need to decide what type of finish I'm going to use to protect the stain. It looks so good right now I don't want to touch it but it needs that last step. Also trying to decide what to do with the speaker grill material. Any ideas?


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Sun 25, 2018 2:19 am 
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Joined: May Thu 14, 2015 4:15 pm
Posts: 1076
Location: Dallas, TX
Wow, my arms are tired watching that. You wife lets you sand inside the house?
The original finish would have been lacquer. Mohawk makes some great stuff. Lacquer is fast drrying fpr production and also it is easier to repair and re-do.
Your going to have to check out several places to fine something close to that grill cloth.
Some places are listed here.
viewtopic.php?f=19&t=201537
That wood looks like mahogany, did you fill the grain or was that just stain?
There must be a way to remove the glass and the frame around the grill. I have never got that far before I set it aside. My metal CRT frame/mask has some dings in it. I planned to remove it and fix that.

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Tim
It's not the Destination, It's the Journey.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Sun 25, 2018 3:15 am 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
It's so smooth I didn't feel the need for grain fill. I didn't really care to match it exact I just really like the dark cherry stain. It's an oil based product I picked up and love the look. I'm going to put a few coats of urethane on it to get it protected. The glass will come out from the inside after I remove the screws it looks like.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Sun 25, 2018 3:34 am 
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Joined: May Thu 14, 2015 4:15 pm
Posts: 1076
Location: Dallas, TX
Well the thing with urethane is that it drys slower (dust pick up) and that it is so tough that it is difficult to re-do or repair. They used lacquer in production because time is money. Lacquer can be removed with lacquer thinner. Lacquer does have to be sprayed.
Check out this video for starters.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sNoq2uY7X3U

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Tim
It's not the Destination, It's the Journey.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Sun 25, 2018 4:16 pm 
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Joined: Jan Sat 16, 2016 10:03 pm
Posts: 376
I agree, lacquer is the way to go. You can spray 4-5 coats in one day with no need to clean the gun between coats. Beware of silicone contamination, it will cause problems in the finish. It took me a very long time to finally find a procedure that works for me and my shop.

I always spray de-waxed shellac as the seal coat until the finish is smooth and shiny. Also, I make my own shellac, its not that difficult at all, check out this web-site for more details, https://wellermart.com/t/shellac.

I then let the unit sit for a few days to allow the alcohol to fully evaporate, then start spraying lacquer until I am happy with the finish. Light coats is the best way to spray lacquer I have found.

I am a amateur garage hobbyist, and I can tell you there are some real pros on here concerning refinishing. They have given me plenty of advise. This is just what works for me in my little shop.

Here are some examples of my work using de-waxed shellac as the sealer coat under the lacquer.

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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Sun 25, 2018 5:19 pm 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
I think you changed my mind after seeing the photos. Jesus that looks amazing. Okay I guess I need to learn about shellac now.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Sun 25, 2018 6:49 pm 
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Joined: Jan Sat 16, 2016 10:03 pm
Posts: 376
If you do spray shellac/lacquer, please remember you will be surrounding yourself with flammable vapor. So no nearby smokers and turn off hot water heater /dryer pilot light if nearby...... and lots of ventilation. The alcohol and lacquer thinner vapor will evaporate rather quickly, so the threat is short lived. Depending on where you live the lacquer can may say "brushing lacquer" as where I live (California). The California EPA requires the labeling of "brushing lacquer" in order to discourage spraying. So you can spray it (of course after you have thinned it accordingly).


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Feb Wed 28, 2018 8:12 pm 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
UPDATE: I purchased a https://www.ebay.com/itm/311658847259 as suggested by bandersen. I hope it works but if not, I'm sure I can fix it. I have been doing a lot of reading back and forth on several of the topics discussed here familiarizing myself as much as possible.

I haven't found a radio yet, still looking. I hit 7 or 8 garage sales and all the antique shops around town looking for one, asking folks if they knew anyone. I might have found a guy who has one for sale. Speaking with the owner of one of the antique shops, he gave me the number to a man who he claims has several. Turns out, it's the man who sold me the television! So I'm going to give him a call and see what he has. I'll post back here when I get some model numbers if he does in fact have any and hopefully y'all can give me advice on which one to try to make a deal on.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Mar Fri 02, 2018 8:08 pm 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
I'm ready to purchase the lacquer but Jesus this stuff is expensive. Does anyone have any experience with the spray can stuff from Lowes by Minwax? How many cans and how many coats should I use to get that wet look?


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Mar Sat 03, 2018 8:50 pm 
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Joined: May Thu 14, 2015 4:15 pm
Posts: 1076
Location: Dallas, TX
You may have to look around for a good price on the Mohawk spray cans. I found them for less than $ 8 at a hardware store near me. Most stores like Lowes or Home Depot don't carry this sort of thing. Look for furniture repair stores. The original finish probably wasn't the "'wet look" found on a custom car. Naturally that takes a lot of coats. The smoother the wood the better. I would guess one coat on your cabinet might take a can. I haven't done something that large yet. You probably would need two or three coats. You might chose a semi-gloss for the final coat. I've used the toners to even the color before the final coat if needed.

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Tim
It's not the Destination, It's the Journey.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Mar Sat 03, 2018 11:47 pm 
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Joined: Jan Sat 16, 2016 10:03 pm
Posts: 376
I have not had good experience with spray-cans on large objects like your TV. When I referenced "spray" I was referencing a HVLP gun as the applicator. You don't need a super expensive HVLP system either.

You can try the spray can approach, however my experience with spray cans were was uneven obvious spray patterns in the wood and copious amounts of over spray on large objects.

This is just my two cents and there are many experts on here that may chime in on this subject.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Mar Sun 04, 2018 7:45 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5353
Location: Woodinville, WA USA
Spraying with a rattle can is just a matter of practice, as with many other things. I'm far from an expert, but I have used cans to respray large consoles and gotten results that stand up well next to cabinets that I've had professionally refinished.

If you bop over to the "Cabinet Restoration" section of ARF, you will find many, many, many discussions about applying lacquer, using toner, etc.:

viewforum.php?f=7

As noted earlier, lacquer is a forgiving medium. If you mess up the first go-round, you can easily remove the lacquer and try again. If you mess up a polyurethane finish, be ready to fire up your belt sander.

Regards,

Phil Nelson
Phil's Old Radios
https://antiqueradio.org/index.html


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Mar Mon 12, 2018 9:07 pm 
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Joined: Feb Mon 19, 2018 11:33 pm
Posts: 53
Location: Lafayette Louisiana
I got the B&K 440 in last week. So tempted to test the CRT. Should I continue reading, learning and preparing to restore the radio? Which by the way, those of you following here that haven't seen my other post, I did buy a couple radios as you all suggested. A fella here on the forum is offering me an isolation transformer which I am assuming is a glorified dim bulb tester? I don't know. Sounds like a good deal though. Just don't want to waste my limited budget on items that I don't really need. What do you guys think?

I found a multimeter at home depot for 43 dollars. A friend of mine suggested I purchase it. I'll get that and a new soldering iron. Any suggestions on soldering irons that may come with extra tips etc.? I don't know anything about them so I'm going to have to do a lot of practicing on wires and such before I begin.


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 Post subject: Re: 1953 Admiral Television help
PostPosted: Mar Tue 13, 2018 12:30 am 
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Joined: Aug Thu 12, 2010 6:25 pm
Posts: 196
Location: Durham, NC
That Home Depot DVM will probably be OK for most things -- the calibration will be good enough for old electronics, and the voltage and resistance ranges most likely will be fine as well. If it has specialty functions like frequency (not too useful for TV) and capacitance (helpful for reading some of those pesky old mica caps) that's a minor bonus.

Get at least a 50 watt soldering iron, or soldering gun, for old TV work. Anything smaller can take a frustratingly long time to melt the solder on joints with more than 3 components, and the extra heating time does no good for the parts. The old 100+ watt class soldering guns (Wen and Weller brands) are usually available cheap used (flea markets, ebay, Craigslist), and they come in very handy when you need to solder or desolder something to the chassis. They're nearly indestructible and rarely go bad, so even a very old beat up one is worth picking up. IMHO. YMMV.

Oh, and if it hasn't been mentioned, a vacuum desoldering tool ("solder sucker") is very helpful when replacing parts in old electronics. I've used SoldaPullt units for decades on circuits of all sizes with great satisfaction. Almost essential if you have to replace a tube socket.

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Mark Nelson
A collector of TV signal boosters and UHF converters -- God help me!
tv-boxes.com


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