Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives :: Books
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Apr Wed 26, 2017 5:13 am


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 2:03 am 
New Member

Joined: Dec Fri 30, 2016 3:06 am
Posts: 8
I am looking for a great cheap but powerful vintage am radio. The ones that I have just cant pull the signal in that I want. I love listening to talk radio but I live way out in the country and can usually only pick up my favorite station in the summer time and even then it's not that good. It just seems that the newer radios are just not as strong as some of the old ones. I have a little Kaito multi band radio and two other newer type radios. I am 60 miles from my nearest station. Do I need to invest in a great vintage transistor radio or do I just need one of those round indoor am antennas? Thanks


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 3:21 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 565
Location: Walden, NY USA
I found this one to be very sensitive and selective.:
Sony-ICF-S10MK2

here also
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sony-ICF-S10-FM ... SwEzxYUcJw

not my auction

It is not vintage however.
Another good radio is the Panasonic RF-1170 made in the 1970's. Extremely selective. I received Colombia South America on it here in NY albeit on a Sunday night/Monday morning.

GE Superadio 1 or 2 is good, also.

_________________
Mike
W2MDM
http://mikesradiosandstuff.weebly.com/index.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 3:44 am 
Moderator

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 19068
Location: Utica, NY 13502 (USA)
If you want a powerful, high sensitivity, vintage portable (not pocket) radio, a Panasonic RF-2200 multiband would be my choice. It is one of the best radios I've ever experienced for distant signal pick-up on both AM and FM. A General Electric Superadio or Superadio II is another popular choice for a high sensitivity AM (and FM) radio. The Sony mentioned above is probably as good as they get in an inexpensive pocket radio. Vintage pocket radios were not known for great performance except for the somewhat larger Zenith Royal 500 series, especially the 500H.

The round, tunable Select-A-Tenna will enhance the reception on any AM radio.

Dave


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 4:10 am 
Member

Joined: Aug Wed 24, 2011 4:35 am
Posts: 3578
Location: Sunnyvale CA
Jcox75 wrote:
I am looking for a great cheap but powerful vintage am radio. The ones that I have just cant pull the signal in that I want. I love listening to talk radio but I live way out in the country and can usually only pick up my favorite station in the summer time and even then it's not that good. It just seems that the newer radios are just not as strong as some of the old ones. I have a little Kaito multi band radio and two other newer type radios. I am 60 miles from my nearest station. Do I need to invest in a great vintage transistor radio or do I just need one of those round indoor am antennas? Thanks


A loop antenna would help in any case. If you are interested in a genuine vintage radio, you should be aware that almost any of them from the mid-70's or earlier will require some refurbishing to work their best. It's not very hard in most cases, but probably necessary.

Assuming you want a transistor radio, I would suggest a GE P-780 or a Zenith Royal 2000. Both were intended to be the highest-performance radios possible, and the Royal 2000 was the very first AM/FM portable radio, and arguably the best ever made. They tend to be rather expensive ($75 at eBay prices). An alternative is a "lunchbox radio" like the Zenith Royal 755, which has very good performance, very good sound for AM, and is dirt cheap.

An alternative is a multiband portable radio like the Zenith Royal 1000/3000 or 7000. I won an informal "DX Contest" here a few years ago with a Royal 1000 and a loop antenna, picking up a 5000 watt station in Hawaii from here in Sunnyvale, CA, about 2400 miles. That's unusual (and there's nothing but salt water and a line of hills between here and there), but tells you what can be possible during nighttime on medium-wave.

Brett


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 4:23 am 
New Member

Joined: Dec Fri 30, 2016 3:06 am
Posts: 8
Wow!! Thanks guys!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 7:29 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 23925
Location: SoCal, 91387
I would second the recommendation for the GE Super Radio 2; it receives both AM and FM, is new enough to not generally require parts replacement, has decent fidelity, and is very sensitive. There are usually quite a few available on eBay, so you should be able to get a good deal on one.

Also obtaining a tunable loop, such as the aforementioned Selec-A-Tenna, or a Grundig AN-200, would be a nice compliment.
Once you tune in an AM station you want, should it be "in the mud", placing the tunable loop next to or behind it, and tuning it to the same frequency as the radio, will dramatically increase the received signal, or it can be used at an angle to null out interference, or a competing station.

_________________
\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\He Who Dies With The Most Radios Wins//////////////////


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 6:13 pm 
New Member

Joined: Dec Fri 30, 2016 3:06 am
Posts: 8
OK, here is what I have done. I have purchased a used Selectatenna on eBay as suggested and if that does not work I will definitely look into a GE Super Radio 2. Thanks for the help and the quick replies.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 9:52 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Sat 19, 2009 3:11 am
Posts: 93
Location: 40.7111 N X 79.7749 W
A low-tech but effective gain increase can be had with a large ceramic or hot-pressed ferrite magnet donated by a defunct loudspeaker. Careful positioning near the internal antenna can make a noticeable improvement. Of course, caution is needed around magnetic data storage devices and shadow mask CRTs. :)

_________________
RJ Kanary
ASEĀ® Certified Master Auto Technician { Retired.}

rjkanary@consolidated.net


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Wed 04, 2017 1:34 am 
Member

Joined: Aug Wed 24, 2011 4:35 am
Posts: 3578
Location: Sunnyvale CA
Jcox75 wrote:
OK, here is what I have done. I have purchased a used Selectatenna on eBay as suggested and if that does not work I will definitely look into a GE Super Radio 2. Thanks for the help and the quick replies.


Read your private messages...

Brett


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: AM radio help
PostPosted: Jan Sat 07, 2017 11:28 pm 
New Member

Joined: Dec Fri 30, 2016 3:06 am
Posts: 8
The Select-a-Tenna totally solved my reception problem. Thank you guys so much for your input!!


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 10 posts ]  Moderator: Dave Doughty

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  




















Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB