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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 7:33 pm 
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Last edited by too-bamp on Jan Sun 15, 2017 7:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 7:46 pm 
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Ed Engelken wrote:
I have is this Hallicrafters S-14 "Sky-Chief" circa 1936. I believe it is the only Hallicrafters receiver ever made with an eye-tube installed.
The Hallicrafters SX-11 "Super Skyrider" has a factory installed tuning eye. I have one but this picture is from the web.

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Dave


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 7:51 pm 
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That SX-11 is an interesting radio, Dave, is that wood cabinet from the factory?


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 8:40 pm 
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Some of my harder to find favorites in the collection...

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McMurdo Silver 5B

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McMurdo Silver 5C

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LSR-101 by Charles Speaker Company in 1929. This receiver was made for the US Lighthouse Service and used at Walla Walla, WA to intercept rum runners communications. The contract was probably run through the US Lighthouse Service to avoid visibility of the contract if run through the US Coast Guard.

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EM Sargent 11-MA. Regenerative receiver used by our local weather service office to pick up agricultural weather service reports for rebroadcast.

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EM Sargent 101Y radio direction finder. Good luck finding another!

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EH Scott Special Communications Receiver. One of about a dozen known to exist in collections today.

Norman

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 9:10 pm 
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Thank you Norman for posting those unusual receivers. Guessing the 5B was one of McMurdo's first models on the market ? What year is it? Never knew McMurdo Silver made communications receivers for the amateur market. That Scott special is phenomenal. I would imagine it's performance is out of this world? Hard to see but looks like a 20 tube set?

Thanks

Jon

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 9:12 pm 
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too-bamp wrote:
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That's a nice S-20R but its a post war CO version.


Todd


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 10:30 pm 
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ketron281989 wrote:
Thank you Norman for posting those unusual receivers. Guessing the 5B was one of McMurdo's first models on the market ? What year is it? Never knew McMurdo Silver made communications receivers for the amateur market. That Scott special is phenomenal. I would imagine it's performance is out of this world? Hard to see but looks like a 20 tube set?

Thanks

Jon


McMurdo Silver made several communications receivers for the amateur market. I believe the 5B was introduced in 1934 and the 5C was the 1935 model introduced in late 1934. The Scott Special Communications Receiver has 26 tubes. I forgot to include the Lincoln R9 receiver but it is apart for restoration at the moment.

Norman

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 11:25 pm 
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Amazing equipment Norman.

Was the cabinet an option with the Scott Special as it was for other Scotts and how's the performance compared to the Philharmonic and Phantom Deluxe?


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 11:33 pm 
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Braithwaite wrote:
ketron281989 wrote:
Thank you Norman for posting those unusual receivers. Guessing the 5B was one of McMurdo's first models on the market ? What year is it? Never knew McMurdo Silver made communications receivers for the amateur market. That Scott special is phenomenal. I would imagine it's performance is out of this world? Hard to see but looks like a 20 tube set?

Thanks

Jon


McMurdo Silver made several communications receivers for the amateur market. I believe the 5B was introduced in 1934 and the 5C was the 1935 model introduced in late 1934. The Scott Special Communications Receiver has 26 tubes. I forgot to include the Lincoln R9 receiver but it is apart for restoration at the moment.

Norman



I never knew Lincoln made comm. receivers. Please post the R9 when it is together again please. How many tubes? The chances of finding such top model communications receivers are null to none! I always keep my eye's open though!

Jon

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Sun 15, 2017 11:53 pm 
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ton10291 wrote:
Amazing equipment Norman.

Was the cabinet an option with the Scott Special as it was for other Scotts and how's the performance compared to the Philharmonic and Phantom Deluxe?


The Scott Special was offered with a utility cabinet similar to other communications receivers of the time. I would like to find one for my set but the chassis is made for a 23-inch nominal utility cabinet, not 19-inch. One Scott Special Communications Receiver is known to exist in a wood console but the cabinet was most likely custom built by a local cabinet company for the owner. Based on a number of circuit features the Scott Special should outperform the Philharmonic but fully restored and correctly aligned sets would have to be compared using instruments. The major circuit difference is that the Scott Special employs two separate RF tuner sections, one for broadcast band and below and the other for shortwave. The tuned circuits in the RF section are also designed such that both the impedance can be matched and the frequency peaked across the band. Proper alignment instructions have yet to surface.

Below is a photo of the Lincoln R9 receiver belonging to a friend. The R9 employs 11 tubes.

Attachment:
Lincoln R9s.jpg
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Norman

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Mon 16, 2017 1:38 am 
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Thewasp wrote:


That's a nice S-20R but its a post war CO version.


Todd

Darn. Oldest one I have right now. :wink:
Anyway, it's been repainted and labeled, but I think the original also said "co."


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Mon 16, 2017 4:46 am 
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Ed Engelken wrote:
That SX-11 is an interesting radio, Dave, is that wood cabinet from the factory?
My SX-11 has a black metal cabinet. I think the wood cabinet in the picture was an aftermarket unit (from what I have read on the internet).

Dave


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Mon 16, 2017 5:59 pm 
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Beautiful receivers, Norman. We don't see many Sargents back east, I had one years ago that I gave to a friend and I think he has one other. The only two I'm aware of around here though I'm sure there are a few more. That Lincoln is quite interesting too, as is the LSR-101. Both new to me.

Jon, I told my wife that getting active on ARF was a good thing for me as it lights a fire under my ass and gets me focused on getting things out and set up since the move. Finally got the room going Friday afternoon and working on it more today. There are a couple old HB transmitters out in the garage that need to come in soon.

Will post a photo of the progress once there's enough to show.


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Mon 16, 2017 6:46 pm 
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Ah, the brass thrumbscrews on that SX-11, I recall making a bunch of those for somebody one time.
I even still have the print for those!

That's a classy looking set indeed.


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Mon 16, 2017 8:05 pm 
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Would these count? They are "Boat Anchors" that is for certain.

Navy RBB-1 and RBC-1 both have a contract date of September 02, 1941. Certainly a prewar design by RCA, but probably used during WWII.

-Steve


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Tue 17, 2017 2:47 am 
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azenithnut wrote:
Would these count? They are "Boat Anchors" that is for certain.

Navy RBB-1 and RBC-1 both have a contract date of September 02, 1941. Certainly a prewar design by RCA, but probably used during WWII.

-Steve



Yes Steve! Nice!

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Tue 17, 2017 2:58 am 
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Todd, KA1KAQ wrote:
Beautiful receivers, Norman. We don't see many Sargents back east, I had one years ago that I gave to a friend and I think he has one other. The only two I'm aware of around here though I'm sure there are a few more. That Lincoln is quite interesting too, as is the LSR-101. Both new to me.

Jon, I told my wife that getting active on ARF was a good thing for me as it lights a fire under my ass and gets me focused on getting things out and set up since the move. Finally got the room going Friday afternoon and working on it more today. There are a couple old HB transmitters out in the garage that need to come in soon.

Will post a photo of the progress once there's enough to show.


Glad the topic has given you motivation Todd! Please post your pre-war receivers and transmitters when able!

This topic should make for a good reference in regards to anyone interested in or collecting pre-war Ham gear. I have found the pre-war boat anchor market a small one as most ham's that like vintage gear prefer the post war sets they grew up with or learned on.

73,

Jon
KM4HPL

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Tue 17, 2017 2:18 pm 
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Love those big silver dials on the mid-1930s Halli's.

Image

This one is barely pre-war. I think this version (HRO-M) was produced in 1940 and 1941.

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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Tue 17, 2017 2:19 pm 
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Jon, I've noticed the same thing about the pre-war market. In the last few years, I've been focusing on receivers from WWII and before. They're getting harder and harder to find, but the prices have stayed fairly reasonable, and as the photos on this thread has shown, the coolness factor for these pre-war sets is tremendous.

Guys, give some stories on how you acquired some of these sets. From what I've seen, the early Hallicrafters (SX-16 and beyond) and the WWII stuff are things you'll encounter at hamfests, swapmeets etc., but not the sets from the other makers. You really have to dig for them. Here on the East Coast, I've been able to acquire a couple of Pattersons and Bretings locally, which surprised me because those were West Coast manufacturers.

As for the RBCs and RBBs, are they heavy or what? In the big ships, weight didn't matter. In 1940, the Navy told RCA to build it the best communications receiver possible, and the hell with cost. In 1940, those receivers cost $2,400 each. Remember that $2,400 in 1940 dollars equals more than $41,000 in today's dollars. They still perform really well, and are a lot of fun to tinker with. They are also a test of your dedication. No wimps need apply, when it comes to lugging one of these monsters to your car and then into your workshop.

One interesting thing on the Hammarlunds. Look at the two-tuning-dial design on the Comet Pro. Hammarlund retained that same basic concept all the way through the SP-600s and the HQ-180s, almost like a trademark. Too bad Hallicrafters didn't do the same thing with those great German silver dials.


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 Post subject: Re: Show us your pre-war boat anchors
PostPosted: Jan Tue 17, 2017 7:05 pm 
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Joe,

Several of my Breting, Patterson, and Sargent receivers came from a person out west who was thinning his collection several years ago. My Pierson KP-81 and KE-93 receivers came from a small local hamfest as did my Meissner Traffic Master and Meissner All-Wave receivers. In general I have found more interesting stuff at smaller rather than larger hamfests but there are exceptions to every rule.

Rodger WQ9E


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