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 Post subject: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Tue 10, 2017 7:08 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 995
Location: Bloomington, IL USA
I have this nice Silvertone Model 1722, but it has a bubble in the veneer that runs vertically up the entire right hand side of the cabinet. See picture.
It looks like that side has "expanded" (maybe from sun light exposure) and with both edges held captive, bubbled up in the middle.

Is there an "easy" way to get rid of it?

Thanks,
Joe


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 Post subject: Re: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Tue 10, 2017 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Jan Mon 16, 2012 4:15 pm
Posts: 3332
Location: Near Brandon, Iowa
I don't think that there's any easy way to fix this. You could try running a razor knife down the length of the center of the bubble, then lift one side gently and inject glue under it, clamping it until set. Repeat for the other half.
Unfortunately, the veneer will still have a bit of "loft" to it due to the presence of the adhesive; but if you used it sparingly you should be able to sand it flat without sanding through the veneer. It might be the least effort just to strip off the old veneer and apply new.


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 Post subject: Re: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Wed 11, 2017 10:53 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2469
Location: England
I had a cabinet which was not as bad as that one. Tried the split with a scalpel and inject glue but it wasn't successful. The problem is that there is no way to slide in grit paper, clean some and blow out with an air duster. Folks say use 'white glue', PVA but I don't think it likes all old glue and loose particles.

As you ease into the gap, to do any prep, more veneer usually starts to lift and it will be very brittle and split easy. Even if you get it stuck down and reasonably flat and then do a lot of refinishing you don't know if that is all going to be wasted effort and material some time later.

So best plan and one that will stand the test of time would be to apply new veneer. Allows you to sand all the old adhesive off of the ply and do a proper job.

Gary


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 Post subject: Re: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Wed 11, 2017 6:50 pm 
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Joined: Jul Sun 26, 2015 11:34 pm
Posts: 388
Location: Hurdle Mills, North Carolina
Does it appear someone has tried to glue it before? You can use a steam iron and iron it then clamp it for 24 hours. Before you iron it though remove the old finish, the iron will melt the finish if you don't. That may fix it for you, if not remove it and replace with new veneer as the others suggest.

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Larry in NC


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 Post subject: Re: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Wed 11, 2017 7:02 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
Posts: 728
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
If that is two layers of veneer, it will be difficult. One layer is easy.

Get a larger syringe that a vet would use, along with the needle. Mix 1 part to 8 parts of Elmer's Carpenter's glue and fill the syringe with that mix. Lay the cabinet on its side and make tiny holes through the veneer near the top and again near the bottom with a drill motor and bit.

One difficulty with a bump like that is that the dimension of the bump is larger than the dimension of the surface that the veneer was originally adhered to. Heat (sunlight, heat lamp, blow dryer, iron or the like) the cabinet. Apply heat outside and inside. (The heat makes the wood more flexible and easier to force a compression or expansion).

While the cabinet is still hot, inject enough glue mixture into one hole until you see it coming out of the other hole. Clamp the side with long cabinet clamps on boards, leaving the two holes exposed so the squeeze can come out freely. As the squeeze comes out, wipe it immediately with a dampened sponge, and keep cleaning it away until the squeeze stops.

Allow to set overnight before removing the clamps. Fill the two holes with appropriate filler. Clean the repaired side as needed.


Last edited by startgroove on Jan Wed 11, 2017 7:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Wed 11, 2017 7:06 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 995
Location: Bloomington, IL USA
Is that 8 parts glue with 1 part water?


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 Post subject: Re: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Wed 11, 2017 7:13 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
Posts: 728
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Oops! Yes, that is 8 parts glue to one part water. The idea is to thin the glue just enough so it will easily travel through the tiny needle opening.


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 Post subject: Re: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Wed 11, 2017 7:18 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 995
Location: Bloomington, IL USA
Thanks for the clarification.

I am concerned that the surface area of the bubble (which is greater now than the original flat surface area) will be too great to seal down. Where will the access material go?


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 Post subject: Re: Bubble in Veneer
PostPosted: Jan Wed 11, 2017 11:45 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
Posts: 728
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
"One difficulty with a bump like that is that the dimension of the bump is larger than the dimension of the surface that the veneer was originally adhered to. Heat (sunlight, heat lamp, blow dryer, iron or the like) the cabinet. Apply heat outside and inside. (The heat makes the wood more flexible and easier to force a compression or expansion)."

You express a very valid concern. Hopefully, the veneer will compress and the cabinet expand enough that the two surfaces will met just fine. However, I think that there is a risk that the cabinet side may bow out some.

Heat and humidity will make wood expand. If you can find a way to expose the inside of the cabinet to that, just inside where the bubble is, you should be able to observe whether the bubble will flatten out enough, before you actually glue it down by the above method.


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