Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives :: Books
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Dec Thu 14, 2017 6:06 pm


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Mon 30, 2017 4:41 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Thu 05, 2008 6:28 pm
Posts: 443
Location: Santa Rosa Ca
Has anybody finished a cabinet with a brush using lacquer?
I would like to do this on my kitchen table where it is warm, and I do not want to spray in the kitchen.

Thanks, Ray


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2017 1:06 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 764
Location: Southwestern,Ontario Canada
You could try a sample, on a piece of scrap wood. I've found that brushing lacquer dries too fast for my liking. It tends to leave brush strokes in it. You need to keep moving when brushing. If you try to go back over an area, it will just make a mess. Brushing lacquer has a lot of retarder in it to prevent fast drying. It does work excellent in a spray gun though. This is just my experience with it. Other people maybe have had better luck.
Just my 2 cents.
Tony


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2017 1:59 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Feb Fri 25, 2011 12:57 am
Posts: 1984
Location: 08033 Cherry Hill Jersey
I use Deft brush on lacquer for shelves and other big projects - not radios. You must use a high-quality brush to avoid getting pull-out, and to minimize brush strokes. The product can bubble, and apply in low humidity. If you do it outside count on insects landing and tree debris being a problem. At least two coats are required, especially on a kitchen table, you don't want drips on the sides and legs, so several thin coats will do the job. It's a good product, just not fast, and can have really good results. The thickness of the brushed application vs spray gives good depth. I've used it on pine, poplar shelves and a larger worktable. It's good to experiment, I was going to use it on a Lane walnut end table, and ended up trying a tinted danish oil product and it turned out fantastic.

Also good idea to read up on whatever product you are using; i.e. sometimes labels on refinishing products can be misleading. Youtube is another great source.

I have never used it on a radio because of all of the intricate cuts, holes, and small details - better to spray.

Refinishing is a huge mysterious world, with many opinions, many processes, and lots of trial and error.
Give it a shot!

_________________
Wants-Crosley Playboy mod. 124 cabinet moldings.
20-30s homebrew ham components
KD2AZI


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2017 2:05 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 11531
Location: S. Dartmouth MA 02748-1225 USA
Lacquer solvents are explosive! Be sure there is no pilot light or a flame nearby. Do ventilate while applying the lacquer, the fumes are toxic.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2017 7:49 pm 
Site Admin

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 9778
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
To get a good, smooth finish you need to use a quality brush. My recommendation would be a badger fitch brush about 1-1/2" to 2" wide. Unfortunately it'll be expensive, but if taken care of will last pretty much forever and give you excellent results with little effort.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2017 8:10 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Thu 05, 2008 6:28 pm
Posts: 443
Location: Santa Rosa Ca
Thanks
I meant to say I will be doing radio refinishing on my kitchen table


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2017 8:24 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 21260
Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
Ray P wrote:
Has anybody finished a cabinet with a brush using lacquer?
I would like to do this on my kitchen table where it is warm, and I do not want to spray in the kitchen.

Thanks, Ray

I strongly recommend Minwax's "Wipe-on-Poly"
This is available at the HW store in satin or gloss....

This is a wonderful surface for furniture. You can apply several coats in a day if you want... but 1 or two is usually enough.

No drips no runs.... just wipe it on with a rag. It's self-leveling and never fails to come out perfectly.
Beautiful.

Image

I used it on two shelves and a library table in the house. I also often use it for radios. And I typically use Satin sometime Gloss ... but if I decide I want less gloss I can take it down with 0000 steel wool buffing lightly.
And finally I apply some Butcher's Paste wax for a perfect durable sheen.

_________________
To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2017 8:48 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Thu 05, 2008 6:28 pm
Posts: 443
Location: Santa Rosa Ca
The only radio I have finished was using polyurethane with a brush, and it came out well.
But one of my mentors says radios lose their value if you do not use lacquer?????
What do you think?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Oct Tue 31, 2017 9:12 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 21260
Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
Ray P wrote:
The only radio I have finished was using polyurethane with a brush, and it came out well.
But one of my mentors says radios lose their value if you do not use lacquer?????
What do you think?

I don't know who told you that. But if you have a beautifully finished radio .... who is going to try to find out what the top coat finish is? And why should it be Lacquer?
Doesn't make sense to me.
Beautiful is beautiful.

_________________
To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Wed 01, 2017 2:05 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Wed 06, 2017 6:06 pm
Posts: 49
Location: New Castle, IN
That wipe-on poly is pretty hard to beat for ease of use (I made a changing table for my son and used that). I gave up on trying to brush on lacquer and just ran it through my gun. Messy? Yes. Smoother? Absolutely! With lacquer, be sure to use a respirator. I wouldn't recommend doing any lacquer finishing in the house; especially in the kitchen, due to how combustible the fumes are (not to mention the health hazards).

As far as losing value, I'm new to the radio world. I mostly work with guitars/amps, and on a guitar, the minute you strip the original finish, it's lost a significant portion of its value. If you're planning on keeping it, do what works for you. I struggle with wrapping my head around that sometimes: It doesn't matter how much value is added or lost if you don't plan to sell it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Wed 01, 2017 9:19 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 21260
Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
johnnyreece wrote:
That wipe-on poly is pretty hard to beat for ease of use (I made a changing table for my son and used that). I gave up on trying to brush on lacquer and just ran it through my gun. Messy? Yes. Smoother? Absolutely! With lacquer, be sure to use a respirator. I wouldn't recommend doing any lacquer finishing in the house; especially in the kitchen, due to how combustible the fumes are (not to mention the health hazards).

As far as losing value, I'm new to the radio world. I mostly work with guitars/amps, and on a guitar, the minute you strip the original finish, it's lost a significant portion of its value. If you're planning on keeping it, do what works for you. I struggle with wrapping my head around that sometimes: It doesn't matter how much value is added or lost if you don't plan to sell it.

I used to use lacquer often with great results. But the over-spray dust got on EVERYthing in my garage... cars included. The temp and humidity are a factor and the freezing cold in the Winter all got me interested in a good alternative. That's when I was watching The New Yankee Workshop w/Norm Abram.
He was using Wipe-On-Poly on a table he was making and he said this Wipe-on-Poly is really perfect, "It's truly a product whose time has come."
Then he demonstrated the use and showed the final results.
That was it!
That was good enough for me.
I love that I still get the same ultra beautiful results and no over-spray. No drip no runs no problems!
That's all I use now.

You can even easily make your own by cutting "regular" Polyurethane 50% with mineral spirits.
Saves a lot of money.

I understand it is available in water-base too... but I haven't used that yet.

Here's a side by side comparison. One was finished w/Wipe-on-Poly and the other w/lacquer.
Can you tell which is which? .. I doubt it because I cannot:

Image

_________________
To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Wed 01, 2017 10:56 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Thu 05, 2008 6:28 pm
Posts: 443
Location: Santa Rosa Ca
Very interesting. I did not think there was a big difference when I brushed on the poly years ago.
This looks like a better way to go.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Thu 02, 2017 5:56 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Thu 05, 2008 6:28 pm
Posts: 443
Location: Santa Rosa Ca
Hi pbpix

I have Deft brand satin poly in a can. Can I cut it 50/50 with mineral spirits to wipe on?

Thanks


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Thu 02, 2017 9:14 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 21260
Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
Ray P wrote:
Hi pbpix

I have Deft brand satin poly in a can. Can I cut it 50/50 with mineral spirits to wipe on?

Thanks

Hi Ray P:

Yes. That's what I've been told.
I haven't done it personally; but others here have.
I would have tried it but already have plenty of the Wipe-on-poly on hand.

_________________
To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Thu 02, 2017 9:37 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Thu 05, 2008 6:28 pm
Posts: 443
Location: Santa Rosa Ca
Thanks


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Fri 03, 2017 2:26 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Wed 04, 2013 2:23 pm
Posts: 560
Location: Atlanta, GA
Pbpix wrote:
johnnyreece wrote:
That wipe-on poly is pretty hard to beat for ease of use (I made a changing table for my son and used that). I gave up on trying to brush on lacquer and just ran it through my gun. Messy? Yes. Smoother? Absolutely! With lacquer, be sure to use a respirator. I wouldn't recommend doing any lacquer finishing in the house; especially in the kitchen, due to how combustible the fumes are (not to mention the health hazards).

As far as losing value, I'm new to the radio world. I mostly work with guitars/amps, and on a guitar, the minute you strip the original finish, it's lost a significant portion of its value. If you're planning on keeping it, do what works for you. I struggle with wrapping my head around that sometimes: It doesn't matter how much value is added or lost if you don't plan to sell it.

I used to use lacquer often with great results. But the over-spray dust got on EVERYthing in my garage... cars included. The temp and humidity are a factor and the freezing cold in the Winter all got me interested in a good alternative. That's when I was watching The New Yankee Workshop w/Norm Abram.
He was using Wipe-On-Poly on a table he was making and he said this Wipe-on-Poly is really perfect, "It's truly a product whose time has come."
Then he demonstrated the use and showed the final results.
That was it!
That was good enough for me.
I love that I still get the same ultra beautiful results and no over-spray. No drip no runs no problems!
That's all I use now.

You can even easily make your own by cutting "regular" Polyurethane 50% with mineral spirits.
Saves a lot of money.

I understand it is available in water-base too... but I haven't used that yet.

Here's a side by side comparison. One was finished w/Wipe-on-Poly and the other w/lacquer.
Can you tell which is which? .. I doubt it because I cannot:

Image



Pbpix - I've used lacquer for decades and was convinced by several restorer friends o not use poly (side note: I hate stripping a cabinet that's been refinished with poly!). With that said, seeing your results (amazing), doggone if I'm not going to try it. Do you prep the wood cabinet any differently that you would when using lacquer? Also, are you using the Minwax stain? Would it be OK to use a lacquer based wipe on stain (I have favorite colors)? Also, if you were to use Mohawk spray toning lacquer (100-), will the poly still come out OK? One other question, I assume you're using grain filler... What worked better, an oil based grain filler or a water based filler? Thanks! David

_________________
Real Radios GLOW In The Dark
Southeastern Antique Radio Society SARS 1991
www.sarsradio.com
K4DLM


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Fri 03, 2017 5:44 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Wed 06, 2017 6:06 pm
Posts: 49
Location: New Castle, IN
If you have something lacquer based, I wouldn't apply poly over it. Lacquer gasses off for an extremely long time, and the poly will often mess with that. If you want to give it a go, I'd suggest testing on scrap first. As a rule, I don't put anything over lacquer except more lacquer. However, it makes a good topcoat over lots of stuff. I've even used it to seal artists oils with no problem.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Fri 03, 2017 11:08 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 21260
Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
Dnitram wrote:
Pbpix wrote:
johnnyreece wrote:
That wipe-on poly is pretty hard to beat for ease of use (I made a changing table for my son and used that). I gave up on trying to brush on lacquer and just ran it through my gun. Messy? Yes. Smoother? Absolutely! With lacquer, be sure to use a respirator. I wouldn't recommend doing any lacquer finishing in the house; especially in the kitchen, due to how combustible the fumes are (not to mention the health hazards).

As far as losing value, I'm new to the radio world. I mostly work with guitars/amps, and on a guitar, the minute you strip the original finish, it's lost a significant portion of its value. If you're planning on keeping it, do what works for you. I struggle with wrapping my head around that sometimes: It doesn't matter how much value is added or lost if you don't plan to sell it.

I used to use lacquer often with great results. But the over-spray dust got on EVERYthing in my garage... cars included. The temp and humidity are a factor and the freezing cold in the Winter all got me interested in a good alternative. That's when I was watching The New Yankee Workshop w/Norm Abram.
He was using Wipe-On-Poly on a table he was making and he said this Wipe-on-Poly is really perfect, "It's truly a product whose time has come."
Then he demonstrated the use and showed the final results.
That was it!
That was good enough for me.
I love that I still get the same ultra beautiful results and no over-spray. No drip no runs no problems!
That's all I use now.

You can even easily make your own by cutting "regular" Polyurethane 50% with mineral spirits.
Saves a lot of money.

I understand it is available in water-base too... but I haven't used that yet.

Here's a side by side comparison. One was finished w/Wipe-on-Poly and the other w/lacquer.
Can you tell which is which? .. I doubt it because I cannot:

Image



Pbpix - I've used lacquer for decades and was convinced by several restorer friends o not use poly (side note: I hate stripping a cabinet that's been refinished with poly!). With that said, seeing your results (amazing), doggone if I'm not going to try it. Do you prep the wood cabinet any differently that you would when using lacquer? Also, are you using the Minwax stain? Would it be OK to use a lacquer based wipe on stain (I have favorite colors)? Also, if you were to use Mohawk spray toning lacquer (100-), will the poly still come out OK? One other question, I assume you're using grain filler... What worked better, an oil based grain filler or a water based filler? Thanks! David

Hi":
All the stains i have around here are minwax wipe on stains.
No I don't do anything different for prep. Same as for lacquer .... when everything is dry, I put on the Wipe-on-poly.
I've never used grain filler... but I'm sure that when it's dry it will be ok.
In the radio above on the right I believe I used toning lacquer on the black stripes ... and no problems. Sometimes I use black enamel on black areas and when it's dry... again.. no problems putting Wipe-on-Poly over it.
You'll love the stuff.
I think it can be used over anything that's dry ... like even painted surfaces.... but I haven't done it with wipe-on-poly... but some years ago I painted some molding with flat latex... then it was too flat... so I used regular poly over it w/o any problems and it looked fine for 15 years or so.

_________________
To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Mon 06, 2017 2:36 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Wed 04, 2013 2:23 pm
Posts: 560
Location: Atlanta, GA
Pbpix - Thanks for your reply. I order a qt of satin and a pint of gloss from Amazon and it came in today. I'm going to give it a go.

Thanks!!!!

_________________
Real Radios GLOW In The Dark
Southeastern Antique Radio Society SARS 1991
www.sarsradio.com
K4DLM


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Brush on Lacquer?
PostPosted: Nov Mon 06, 2017 4:31 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 21260
Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
Dnitram wrote:
Pbpix - Thanks for your reply. I order a qt of satin and a pint of gloss from Amazon and it came in today. I'm going to give it a go.

Thanks!!!!

It's foolproof stuff. Enjoy.

_________________
To be a man, Be a non-conformist, Nothing's sacred as the integrity of your own mind.
-Emerson


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 26 posts ]  Moderator: Peter Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  


















Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB