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 Post subject: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 12:34 am 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
Posts: 664
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Once Prohibition ended, the opportunities for suppliers to place coin operated phonographs in public locations grew as rapidly as the opening of new, and legal, bars, taverns and other places of public gatherings. Even the slang term "jukebox" was more often being used to describe these wonderful music machines. In 1935, Wurlitzer began its first campaign to claim a slice of the lucrative new market. Automatic Music Inc., Gabel, Mills, Seeburg, Wurlitzer and a few others were competing in this growing field, each expanding their manufacturing capabilities and improving their marketing skills.

Please show us your 1935 to 1945 Models.

Here is a 1936 Rockola Model B2 "Regular"


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 10:41 am 
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Joined: Sep Sat 05, 2009 9:45 pm
Posts: 936
Location: Sun City, Arizona
Here's the ones I have made prior to 1945:

First is 1940 Wurlitzer 750-E from Mexico prior to restoration - Tough restoration, Coin Gear was hard to get!
Image

Same 1940 Wurlitzer 750-E From Mexico, after restoration
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1940 Wurlitzer 800
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another 1940 Wurlitzer 750-E With HTF Light-Up Backdoor
Image


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Tue 03, 2017 8:27 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
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Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Nice machines! And great job on the restoration of the 750! Here are a few more of ours.


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Wed 04, 2017 4:26 am 
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Joined: Feb Fri 17, 2012 5:13 am
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Location: Rockville, CT. 06066
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Here's my Wurlitzer model 50 from 1938. As found. A countertop mechanism in a floor console cabinet. It only takes up about 2 square feet of floor space.

MrLee


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Wed 04, 2017 10:08 am 
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Joined: Sep Sat 05, 2009 9:45 pm
Posts: 936
Location: Sun City, Arizona
The Wurlitzer 950 and Victory are great looking machines. They look like they just rolled out of Tonawanda, NY. Some great advertising in the background too. I've always thought the Victory models have such a wonderful history of how and why they came to be. I've had a few parts like a wooden tone arm base from one but never came close to having owned one.

The Wurlitzer Model 50 looks great too. I've seen just one or two but that is the nicest one.

Lots of great stories out there too like the Seeburg Black Widow Room. I wish I knew more details about that. I've never seen anything in print; just people who have spoken of it.


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Wed 04, 2017 3:53 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
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Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Wow, I just saw that your Wurlitzer 750 has the rare light up back door panel. Sweet!

What is the Seeburg Black Widow Room? I'd like to hear the story.

That Model 50 is nice, something we don't often see. It resembles a Model 616, but because it is very petite, the 50 seems more attractive. Love that style!


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Wed 04, 2017 8:39 pm 
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Location: Gavilan Hills, (Perris) CA
'36 Simplex 412


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Wed 04, 2017 11:44 pm 
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Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
That's a gorgeous looking Wurlitzer. Tnx for showing us.


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2017 2:33 am 
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Location: Gavilan Hills, (Perris) CA
startgroove wrote:
That's a gorgeous looking Wurlitzer. Tnx for showing us.


I know most of its history.
Was originally in a bar in Crescent City, CA
Then moved to Portland in the late 30s until it came into my hands about 5 years ago.

Needed routine stuff but now plays great & strong and functions properly.

-Steve-

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I never drink anything stronger than gin
before breakfast. -W.C. Fields-


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2017 11:15 am 
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Joined: Sep Sat 05, 2009 9:45 pm
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Location: Sun City, Arizona
That is a beautiful Wurlitzer 412. Having the history is such a nice bonus to owning one of these wonderful machines. We've had a 412 and it was a really good machine. Mine was missing the upper backdoor and I could not locate a proper replacement. I made one but I really like the original stuff much better. I wish we had kept it (I guess I say that about every jukebox we no longer have).

The Seeburg Black Widow Room! I know so little I probably am very wrong about some of this. I wish I could recall who told or wrote about it.

During WWII jukebox production just about stopped, Wurlitzer did make the Victory Model which is another I am not qualified to comment on except it was a beautiful machine using rebuilt parts, wood parts where possible and glass panels instead of plastic. Minimal metal, I think, was the goal. Other jukebox companies used their smarts and factories to support the war in everyway they could. I think Rock-Ola made M-1 Carbines among other items.

Seeburg, of course, made a lot of things in support of the war. A need for the crosshairs in telescopic sights(?) arose. A good material was the strands of web from a black widow spiders web. We have that variety of spider in many areas of Arizona. When I see a spider web around the house I run my fingers through it. The strongest web strands are usually representative of a black widow's presence. They are really strong compared to most other spider's webs. If it is a strong web I return, at night, flashlight in hand, to eliminate the dangerous spider even though I hate doing that.

The story goes, Seeburg had a room which was a home for their black widows. Someone would go in there and harvest the web strands for use in telescopic sights. That is about all I remember, perhaps someone can verify, correct or conclude I must have dreamed that. Feel free to do so because I would like to know more about it as well.

Anna's sister was bitten twice by a black widow and was really miserable (look before you sit in a lawn chair by the pool!) She has the scars to prove it. It can be a lot worse for some people. At the very least a call to poison control is immediately in order. I would go to one of those urgent care centers myself cause I am a "chicken". Brown recluse spiders scare me even more.


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2017 5:33 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
Posts: 664
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Very interesting story, and it definitely makes sense. I've heard about the war time production of a few of the jukebox manufacturers.

You are right about the Victory model. I'd like to expand on that some. The background is this. Wurlitzer had begun production of the model 950 in late 1941 (September?). It featured many significant improvements including a higher technology all electric push button selection system and refinements to the coin system, as well as color changing pilasters, bubbling display tubes and detailed backlit artistic panels. About 400 were in production by the day of the Pearl Harbor Attack. Shortly after that date, Roosevelt ordered a halt to civilian production and an immediate switch over to production of war goods. Wurlitzer had accumulated the parts to assemble many more model 950's, and continued to finalize assembly on the ones that were in the production line at the time. One of the materials that was in immediate demand even before the war, was the thick vacuum formed plastic used for making airplane canopies. This plastic was also used in the pilasters of the 950. Wurlitzer switched to vacuum formed glass pilasters early in the production of 950's and after the war started, the machinery to make those parts was being used to make other war related items. Hence, the last 950's had wooden facsimile's of the pilasters and substituted materials for other parts. Only about 456 or the Model 950 made it through the production process.

In spite of the new American involvement in the war, the demand for jukeboxes remained high. Music operators across the country had snapped up the available 950's and wanted more of them. No new ones were forthcoming because the critical machinery for die casting parts was in full war production. Certain materials such as plastics, and plating metals such as cadmium, chromium and nickel, were impossible to obtain for anything not directly war related. To answer the continuing demand for new machines, Wurlitzer took an unusual step. The engineering department came up with a design for a cabinet that did not used plastic, nor metal decorative parts, and did not require the use of the machinery which formed curved wooden parts (those were being used to form airplane spars and the like). The idea was to ship the empty cabinet to the music operator. They would then take the complete inner workings of an older Wurlitzer, and install them into this new cabinet. There were wooden adapter kits provided which would allow a variety of older Wurlitzer's to be used as a source for the innards. Those included the models 24, 500, 600R and 600K. The cabinet was so well designed as a universal model, that almost any jukebox could be used as a donor.

Designated the Victory Model 42 (possibly in anticipation of the outcome of the war). A paper label was provided so the operator could write in the model number and serial number of the donor machine. Once thus written in, that label was installed to the upper part of the wood cabinet and covered with a layer of protective plastic, held in place by tacks.


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2017 6:01 pm 
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Posts: 664
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Here's our 1940 Wurlitzer 780M. The grille cloth is not original. The original one is underneath. We decided to protect from fading and possible damage with a sturdier material. Also, this one has a Jacobs light tracking tone arm kit on it. That uses a crystal pickup fed through a Kit 87 pre-amp to match impedance and tone.


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Thu 05, 2017 7:28 pm 
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Location: Gavilan Hills, (Perris) CA
Beautiful 780 Wagon Wheel !

I also converted my 412 to an Astatic crystal pick up & Jacob's pre amp.
Even though I rebuilt the original magnetic head, all that weight could really
tear up the shellac. Fine if you were changing out records every week or two.

We use the machine regularly & change selections according to the seasons
so lightening the tone arm to protect the records is a modification I am willing
to make...and it is easily reversible.

-Steve-

_________________
I never drink anything stronger than gin
before breakfast. -W.C. Fields-


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Fri 06, 2017 10:45 am 
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Joined: Sep Sat 05, 2009 9:45 pm
Posts: 936
Location: Sun City, Arizona
Great history of the Wurlitzer Victory. Thank You! Your knowledge is amazing. Wurlitzer was ahead of the game and managed to produce a new model jukebox despite all the restrictions and shortages of war. It was a different and great looking machine at that. Thank You for the information and great reading. It seems like that would be a nice addition to the "Jukebox Addict" forum that has just started up.

I really like the 780-M, it looks like it just rolled out of the Wurlitzer factory. I bought a 780-E many years ago from a lady who owned a bar here in Phoenix. It was really nice. While cleaning it I found, in the coin box, a receipt for its purchase from a local music company. She had bought it used for the sum of $35.00 sometime in the 1950's. I think she bought it just before RCA and 45 RPM records became popular. I cannot remember what I paid for it, I think it was $400 but finally traded it for the Wurlitzer 1100 we have today.

Fun Fair Days In A "Shared" Space

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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Fri 06, 2017 4:12 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
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Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Oh, do I remember the Fun Faire Days!! Found some interesting things there. Sure do miss those days. Hey, is that a Mills Do Re Mi in the background?

The 780M came from South Milwaukee, Wisconsin. I got it in 1978 from an older couple who were preparing to go into a smaller home. They had purchased it in 1952. It had been converted to play 45's and came with the Jacobs set-up. It was in their basement and when I went to pull up the stairs, it would not fit through the stairwell. The older gentleman explained that they moved the jukebox down there before they had remodeled the basement, so the stairwell had been lined with a lower ceiling after that. the combined dimensions of the machine and my dolly made it a half inch too big to fit. We decided to dismantle the machine, removing everything down to just the bare cabinet. The two of us hand carried the stripped cabinet up the stairs, where we reassembled it in my truck.

Through the years this machine has been our workhorse. It has even been in two television commercials, and entertained at a 1940's theme party at Sony Studios. It has been restored twice since we've owned it, the most recent time was three years ago.

Here's a shot of a group of early machines. Far right is a 1928 Western Electric Piano Company, next to that is a 1929 Capehart, then a 1931 Mills Troubadour. At the far end is a 1940 Seeburg Commander.


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Last edited by startgroove on Jan Fri 06, 2017 7:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Fri 06, 2017 6:22 pm 
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Location: Gavilan Hills, (Perris) CA
<gotta clean the drool off this keyboard>
:shock:

_________________
I never drink anything stronger than gin
before breakfast. -W.C. Fields-


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Fri 06, 2017 8:55 pm 
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Location: Long Beach, CA 90808
WOW!

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Aloha, Ken

No Console Left Behind!
Come join us @ http://vintagehifi.net/


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Sat 07, 2017 12:47 am 
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Russie, unbelievable collection of early jukeboxes you have. What model is the Capehart please?

Thanks,

Jon

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"A Minute of Care is Worth an Hour of Repair" circa 1930.


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Sat 07, 2017 1:19 am 
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Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
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Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
Jon, that is a Model 1.


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 Post subject: Re: Show Us Your 1935 to 1945 Jukebox
PostPosted: Jan Sun 08, 2017 12:56 am 
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Joined: Feb Fri 17, 2012 5:13 am
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Location: Rockville, CT. 06066
I have nothing to compare to Russie's gorgeous restorations, but there's a couple more pre-war machines quietly waiting their turn out in my garage. A 1937 Wurlitzer 24, and a 1939 Rock-Ola CM-39 countertop.
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Attachment:
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R-O CM-39.jpg [ 246.59 KiB | Viewed 970 times ]

MrLee


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