Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives :: Books
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Sep Sat 20, 2014 6:58 pm


All times are UTC [ DST ]



Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 25 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Huge Motorola Masterpiece Hi-Fi portable!
PostPosted: Feb Tue 23, 2010 7:17 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Fri 16, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 512
Location: The Twilight Zone
Has anyone seen this model before?
Its giant and must have some speaker system,unfortunately the seller has no model number
Has the hi-fi badge and pilot light.
I am wondering what amp it has and the size and array of speakers?

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Motorola-Ma ... 414d3a88d8


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Tue 23, 2010 9:49 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3812
Location: Berkley, Michigan
That monster has the same 6 tube amplifier in it as a '57 Motorola console Masterpiece and it doesn't weigh much less than the console. Motorola claimed 20 watts. A receiving tube manual says different though. It has a wicked ammount power for a portable.

Tube lineup:
1 - 5Y3 rectifier
2 - 6V6 push-pull power output
2 - 12AU7 2nd, 3rd, 4th audio amps and phase inverter
1 – 6AU6 1st audio amp

Speakers:
1 - 8-inch woofer
2 - 4-inch tweeters

Cartridge:
Sonotone 3T

_________________
That warm tube sound can usually be overcome by turning up the treble.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Wed 24, 2010 3:45 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Fri 16, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 512
Location: The Twilight Zone
Thanks Doug!
Man,you sure know your record players!
I bet Motorola didn't sell many of these Masterpiece "portables".
It's funny that this model was out the same year as the calypso but it uses the VM changer rather than a bsr.
How much did this one cost new?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Wed 24, 2010 4:38 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Sun 18, 2009 11:41 pm
Posts: 533
Here is a Motorola SH18GL "Portable".

Calls itself Motorola Three Channel Stereophonic High Fidelity.

I picked it up about a month ago. Weighs 45 pounds and measures 23" x 21" x 10" when closed. There are 3 speakers: right, left, and "bass". The original manual claims 34 watts max peak power. Tubes are EZ81, 6BQ5, 2 x 12AX7A, and 2 x ECL82. All the tubes were marked Motorola but made in Great Britain and Holland.

Chassis HS-765 in Sams 493-11 dated 1960.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Wed 24, 2010 4:57 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Sat 17, 2009 7:31 am
Posts: 356
Location: USA
You could turn your "Sock Hop" into a BLOCK PARTY with that thing!...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Wed 24, 2010 6:18 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Fri 16, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 512
Location: The Twilight Zone
Wow,32 watts is a lot of power for a console in the day let alone a portable.
What does it sound like?
How long did Motorola make a three channel stereo?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Wed 24, 2010 11:06 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3812
Location: Berkley, Michigan
Hi-Fi in Fiberglass wrote:
...I bet Motorola didn't sell many of these Masterpiece "portables".
It's funny that this model was out the same year as the calypso but it uses the VM changer rather than a bsr.
How much did this one cost new?

Motorola sold more of these than you would think. It was a lot less expensive than some of the portable Pilot models that used Garrard turntables with GE magnetic cartridges. I don’t have any sales info on the Masterpiece but I’ll bet it topped $200.

Motorola didn't play favorites with record changer manufacturers. The lowest bidder got the contract. Early ‘50s changers were still built by Motorola. Later, V-M was the most used followed by Webcor and then a few BSR changers. They may have used all three brands in a single year. Some of the lo-fi versions of the Calypso and Masterpiece used Webcor changers

Hi-Fi in Fiberglass wrote:
Wow,32 watts is a lot of power for a console in the day let alone a portable.
What does it sound like?
How long did Motorola make a three channel stereo?

Looking at a receiving tube manual for the output tubes used, true, undistorted, combined power output would be closer to 18-watts, still, a lot of power for a ’60 portable.

Most Motorola 3-channel amps combined the low frequencies from both channels at the first AF amp stage and drove a third amplifier with that combined signal.

Low frequencies are non-directional. The bass channel speaker could be mounted in the larger main cabinet, better for reproducing bass while the left and right channels reproduced only the mids and highs were located in the smaller detachable speaker enclosures that could be spread out for maximum stereo separation.

Other techniques were used to create a center channel bass system with only two amplifier channels. The low frequency audio output signals of the two amplifiers were combined at the speaker system using crossover components.

_________________
That warm tube sound can usually be overcome by turning up the treble.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Wed 24, 2010 6:53 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3103
Location: Boston, MA USA
Power ratings were highly manipulated in the 1960s and 70s. There were many variations intended to capture the ability of an inexpensive amplifier to deliver more power to music peaks than it could to continuous sine waves.

IHF (Institute of High Fidelity) Music Power (used by main hi-fi manufacturers), EIA (Electronic Industry Association) Music Power, more liberal, used by main consumer electronics manufacturers like RCA and Motorola, etc., were the two main ratings.

And then even these ratings were further corrupted by "peak" power ratings which doubled them, and then to add insult to injury "Instantaneous Peak Power (IPP)" which doubled them again, and you had stereo compact systems rated at 100 watts power which only drew 30 watts from the wall outlet!

Finally the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) stepped in and issued very strict regulations for power output, going back to sine wave RMS ratings where hi-fi first started.

-David


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Thu 25, 2010 12:45 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10716
Location: Baltimore, MD, USA
dberman51 wrote:
Power ratings were highly manipulated in the 1960s and 70s. ...

Finally the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) stepped in and issued very strict regulations for power output, going back to sine wave RMS ratings where hi-fi first started.

-David


Isn't that the truth. Thank goodness the craziness came to an end. I actually remember this "War"...

_________________
Don


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Thu 25, 2010 1:50 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3812
Location: Berkley, Michigan
Don Cavey wrote:
...Isn't that the truth. Thank goodness the craziness came to an end. I actually remember this "War"...

It was beginning to sound more like they were selling toasters and space heaters than audio equipment.
IPP= Instantaneous Pretentious Power,

_________________
That warm tube sound can usually be overcome by turning up the treble.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Thu 25, 2010 3:46 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Fri 16, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 512
Location: The Twilight Zone
DougVanCleave wrote:
"Some of the lo-fi versions of the Calypso and Masterpiece used Webcor changers"

What did the Webcor changer you saw in the one speaker Motorola look like?
So far I have both colors of the top of the line Hi-Fi Calypso and all three colors of the cheap lo-fi two knob model and they all have BSR UA8 changers.
Do you think they had problems with the BSR units and stuck Webcors in later models? or was it likely merely a cost saving decision.
I know they went through a few design revisions on the top front feet and the way the metal amp cover was mounted to the fiberglass,the '57 models have three screws on top,but the anchors would break loose in the fiberglass posts and service men couldnt get the screws out without breaking the screws out of the fiberglass.
I like the custom made Motorola branded monarch that had the bright gold plated streamlined tone arm.
I always wished they used that model in the Calypso as its far more modernistic looking.
Maybe one day I will make a "custom" Calypso with one of those changers.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Thu 25, 2010 3:55 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Fri 16, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 512
Location: The Twilight Zone
Doug VanCleave wrote:
Don Cavey wrote:
...Isn't that the truth. Thank goodness the craziness came to an end. I actually remember this "War"...

It was beginning to sound more like they were selling toasters and space heaters than audio equipment.
IPP= Instantaneous Pretentious Power,



The auto industry changed the horsepower ratings on engines because of similar sales tactics.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Thu 25, 2010 3:57 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Fri 16, 2009 12:26 am
Posts: 512
Location: The Twilight Zone
I am curious,what is the most powerfull late 50's Hi-Fi portable ever made?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Thu 25, 2010 5:57 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Sun 11, 2007 6:55 am
Posts: 6962
Location: Mission Viejo, southern California
Interesting topic. Perhaps most of these date to about the time I was born in the late 1950s?

I recently bought this GE "portable" The condition was too ncie to pass it up, and it works well. The cabinet is painted metal.

Image

Image

_________________
many of my radios http://s269.photobucket.com/user/FSteph ... t=3&page=1


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Thu 25, 2010 9:34 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Oct Wed 14, 2009 6:36 am
Posts: 4348
Location: New York USA
Califone and Newcomb both made large portable tube phonos with detachable 12" speakers in the 1950's designed for school gymnasiums. I have a Bogen portable public-address system from 1968 with a 30 watt tube amplifier and two 12" speakers in a wood case that separates, and it is designed to hold a magnetic cartridge record player on top of the amplifier. These units are powerful with great sound, and very rugged. I am still using mine for community meetings.
Don


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Thu 25, 2010 11:16 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3812
Location: Berkley, Michigan
Hi-Fi in Fiberglass wrote:
...Do you think they had problems with the BSR units and stuck Webcors in later models? or was it likely merely a cost saving decision. I like the custom made Motorola branded monarch that had the bright gold plated streamlined tone arm...

I don’t think they had any major problems with the BSR changers because they came back to them in later high end models. There is another changer that they used in the same time period, Crescent, the one Sears Silvertone used almost exclusively. That too was customized for Motorola and looked great.

The Webcor changers were painted Motorola colors and had a Motorola logo on the control escutcheon, not as customized as some of the others.

_________________
That warm tube sound can usually be overcome by turning up the treble.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Fri 26, 2010 1:24 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Sun 18, 2009 11:41 pm
Posts: 533
For those of you who haven't had enough, here is an ad from Billboard Magazine October 19, 1959 with details on the Motorola SH18 portable phonograph.

http://books.google.com/books?id=RgoEAA ... 18&f=false

Also, according to the Sams Photofact, the record changer in the portable unit was a V-M1201. In the console versions they used a Monarch UA8.

Finally, someone is parting one of these out on E***. It is not my auction!! Look what the amp is going for!

http://cgi.ebay.com/Vintage-Motorola-St ... 2c532a4f09

Someone paid $202.50!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mar Mon 29, 2010 12:01 pm 
New Member

Joined: Mar Fri 19, 2010 7:01 pm
Posts: 1
I recently came into one of theses Motorola portables, may actually be the exact one listed at the start of this thread as I live in Norfolk. It still works, but the tracking(?) goes bad (arm drags across the record) and after a bit of playing there is a faint burning smell. I'm told that it needs a new needle and that the tube amp is going bad.

I assumed it was late 40's early 50's, but after reading here it seems late 50's is more likely? I'd kinda like to get it repaired, but have no idea where to start. Stumbled upon this thread searching on google. I'm a total noob on the subject, and don't know much about these old record players at all.

I'm torn between gutting it, salvaging the original plate that the turntable rests on, and putting a modern turntable in it - hooking up a solid state amp or maybe trying to find a modern day tube equivalent (would that be sacrilegious?), or trying to find somewhere that might be able to get it into fighting shape. The idea of listening to some of the old ella fitzgerald albums I have on it is awesome.

Any suggestions would be welcolme, thx! =)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mar Mon 29, 2010 5:34 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 10716
Location: Baltimore, MD, USA
beatniqe wrote:
...
Any suggestions would be welcolme, thx! =)



Welcome to ARF!

In a word, "Don't!"

Seriously, new cartridges, and cleaning up and lubricating of the turntable should fix the first problem. As for the amplifier, the parts are readily available and there are not too many parts in that amp. It would be very easy to just fix it up instead of engineering a whole new ensemble.

Ask here and we all will help!

_________________
Don


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Aug Thu 12, 2010 12:35 am 
New Member

Joined: Aug Thu 12, 2010 12:30 am
Posts: 1
I hope I'm not reviving a too-long dead thread here....

We just picked up one of these monsters- someone at a local bar was getting rid of one and we said 'why not?' Everything seems to work properly, thought the pots need cleaning and the connections for removing and extending the speakers need attention. We thought we'd just sell it on craigslist and make $25 or something, but now we think we'll keep it. I think we've been seduced by the four old LPs that were in it! Anyway, maybe a dumb question, but what is the cylindrical thing clipped into the lid?

thanks


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 25 posts ]  Moderator: Larry Hillis Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  



















Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB