Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives :: Books
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Dec Fri 19, 2014 6:28 pm


All times are UTC [ DST ]



Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 30 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Tue 27, 2010 4:49 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Oct Sat 31, 2009 6:53 pm
Posts: 3630
Location: Louisville, Ky
I thought when members of ASA were debriefed on discharge we were told not to advertise that fact for the rest of our lives due to our security clearance.
t.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Tue 27, 2010 8:56 pm 
Silent Key
User avatar

Joined: Feb Wed 03, 2010 1:01 am
Posts: 5110
Location: Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933
I don't think what we knew then would be much value to 'anyone' now. Most of the places I was are all gone and destoyed or taken over by their respective militaries to grow mushrooms in. (See 7RRFS web site ) http://www.83rdrrsou.org/newhomepage.htm

Where, when and what MOS were you? I was a 05H20 (morse intercept) and a 98C (crypto-analyst)

Besides, what are they going to do? Send me to Vietnam?

Bill

_________________
ka9cwk


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Tue 27, 2010 10:45 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Oct Sat 31, 2009 6:53 pm
Posts: 3630
Location: Louisville, Ky
Good points-
I guess they impressed it on me pretty strongly.
I was discharged in 1962, before we were 'in' Vietnam.
(HAH, that's where we were).
Yeah, I was stationed at a 'secret' base in Mass. Having been a Ham, that's what I did too, code intercept.
Then I was assigned to an even MORE secret area where we made up reasons for deaths in places we weren't supposed to be. My favorite was "cleaning kitchen floor with karosene".
Then I went kind of crazy and got a "medical under special circumstances", which really just meant no benefits.
ASA< Another Stupid Assignment>
t.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Tue 27, 2010 10:59 pm 
Silent Key
User avatar

Joined: Feb Wed 03, 2010 1:01 am
Posts: 5110
Location: Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933
No, really there was no ASA in Vietnam :D We were just"signal corp"

I have had an interest in radio since then, but did not get a ham ticket till 78. Of course the code part was a breeze. I was at Fort Devens (now a commercial developement) for 8 months for cw and advanced intercept techniques. Then went to crypto school for 8 more months. Then went to beautiful S.E. Asia and spent almost three years there. (in various undisclosed places).

Because..........yes you guessed it, There was no ASA in S.E. Asia. :D

_________________
ka9cwk


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Tue 27, 2010 11:32 pm 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 34328
Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
The only guy I knew who was into Crypto was Gary, W7FG, (sk) while he was in the Navy. He went in later than I did, and he got out as a CT1 and I was a stinking ATR-3! He got to see the world and spent a lot of time in Morocco, where he made the first US to Morocco six meter contact ever for ham radio when he was CN8BO.

He never talked of his job, however. Just things like living in Morocco and such.
Curt

_________________
Curt, N7AH
(Connoisseur of the cold 807) CW forever!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 12:43 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Oct Sat 31, 2009 6:53 pm
Posts: 3630
Location: Louisville, Ky
Well, I guess if you can admit that Fort Devens existed, it's all up for grabs. Geez! When I was there you weren't supposed to talk about it, and it was deliberately made to look like a college campus. We wore civies most of the time, and had to sign a security form before going on pass. The good things were you didn't have roll call, or inspection, and most of the time it really WAS like being in school. When your shift was over it was pretty much free time.
I had one sargent, though, that really HATED the relaxed atmosphere. He was career and "RA all the way". We LOVED giving him a hard time.
I just dug out my "Notice of Classification", (1-Y), and my Registration certificate.
15-42-43-616

WOW, This thread has taken a sharp turn.

After I got diagnosed with Bi-polar, I tried to get my discharge upgraded to general medical, (DD Form 293)
(I can't BELIEVE I still have this stuff).
You have to travel, at your own expense, to Washington. The board you appear before will not accept documentation, only personal appearence of any witnesses. And you MUST be represented by an attorney, also at your own expense.
Needless to say- I passed.

Wow- you just HAD to dig all this up, didn't you?

To be honest, though, it's kind of fun. I haven't looked at this stuff in years.

Terry[/img]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 1:08 am 
Silent Key
User avatar

Joined: Feb Wed 03, 2010 1:01 am
Posts: 5110
Location: Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933
I did not know that W7FG was (sk). I bought lots of manuals off him back when he started up his company. Heck I thought we about the same age (62). I even think I worked him on AM a couple of times back in the 80's.

Sad to here that.

No, we were not allowed to say what we did either. But that was almost 40 years ago. You can imagine the 'Vintage' gear we used back then. R-390's and old Underwood "clackity-clack" mills. or typewriters. Upper case only. Eventually we got "new clackity clack" teletype type machines. We had to some times hit the keys several times to make them work. That was not fun when copying some guy on hand crank generated cw at 25 wpm.

The technology today is Science Fiction compared to what we had and what we could do.

Did not mean open old wounds

Bill

_________________
ka9cwk


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 1:30 am 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 34328
Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
Yes, Gary Gompf, W7FG, became a silent key in January of 2009, so he has been gone for over a year now. Him and I were he same age and I first met him two days after getting my General class license back in June of 1965. He was K7VAT back then and he showed me his basement hamshack where he had an NCX-5 driving a pair of 813's in grounded grid. He let me paddle his bug and I worked my first DX station from his QTH, a Japanese station.

Gary and I kept in touch over the years after he got out of the Navy and we would often run into each other breaking the pileups on the low end of the 40 meter CW band.

Him and I were very close friends, and it really hurt me to find out that he passed away due to a massive heart attack while he was getting his big motor home stocked up for an upcoming trip.
Curt

_________________
Curt, N7AH
(Connoisseur of the cold 807) CW forever!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 3:34 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Oct Sat 31, 2009 6:53 pm
Posts: 3630
Location: Louisville, Ky
That's okay Curt-
He went doing what he wanted, and he didn't linger in a lot of pain.

That's how my mom went, and I'd rather go like that. My dad had leukemia. That's NOT how I wanna go.

AND- you know you've got friends here too.

So 'spook,
I guess we can tell 'em where those hand cranked generators were located now, huh?

Hold on...there's someone at the door..............................................
8)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 4:17 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2593
Location: Lewiston, ID
Wow, small world!

ASA 71-74.

Russian at DLI Monterey. Voice intercept school at Goodfellow AFB. About a year at FS Augsburg, and then the rest at NSA.

04B2LRU, 98G2LRU, duty MOS was 98C.

The debriefing, other than signing all the required promises to never talk about anything, basically had two key elements: Zero travel outside CONUS for one year, no travel to any communist controlled countries for TEN years.

Lots of good memories!

PS: I assume you all know that ASA was completely eliminated several years ago. Too much duplicated budget between MI and the three different service intelligence agencies: ASA, USAFSS, and NSG.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 5:14 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Wed 02, 2008 8:12 pm
Posts: 279
A friend of mine was a Navy intercept operator in Vietnam. He could copy CW pretty quickly - as long as he used a mill. He had two R390s in his basement set up for diversity. His wife spent a year tracking down a mill to surprise him with on his birthday. That was a cool station.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 3:00 pm 
Member

Joined: Oct Sat 20, 2007 3:36 am
Posts: 14393
Location: Southern NH, 03076
I went to the 2nd Crypto USN repair school for the SS Philco KW-32 (if memory serves). Besides trying to keep that POS working and installing FCN's the RM's were having a ball keeping Model 15's from flying apart when the fleet first went from 60 to 100 WPM circuits.

That order was recinded until all ships received Model 28's.

Carl


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 4:31 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 906
Location: Johnston,R.I.
Wow...it IS a small world! I, too, copied code with Air force 1970-1973. Went to code school in Biloxi, Mi.....then spent 18 months in southern Italy, and 15 months in Taipei, Taiwan. R-390's , Flair 9 ant. and the ol' typewriter! Like learning to ride a bike though, haven't touched code in 35 years since, but instantly recognize it and try to "copy" it when I hear it. (difficult for me to do though with just pen and paper - I need that ol' typewriter!)

Joe


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 5:20 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Wed 23, 2009 2:38 am
Posts: 232
Don't mean to drive the topic off subject but maybe you gentlemen can answer a question for someone who never served in the military.

In the early 1960s, my late father owned a company that did contract work for the US Army involving army technical manuals and translation work for the USAF.

He mentioned a few times that the work his company did required a security clearance and that he personally held - what I understood him to say was - a "Q" (?) clearance, pronounced like the word "cue" in "pool cue".

Assuming the technically correct term is "Q clearance" can anyone advise exactly what that clearance involved or allowed a person access to?

Thank you all for your service to our country.

_________________
/// Joe

Et in ARF Ego.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 6:25 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Oct Sat 31, 2009 6:53 pm
Posts: 3630
Location: Louisville, Ky
I forget what ours were called. I only know that it was the top clearence you could get, and involved a lot of FBI types talking to everybody you ever knew. I do remember it was "eyes only"

Good thing they didn't find out my grandfather was a socialist. Come to think of it, that WAS right around the time he disappeared. :?

I don't think it's so unusual that a lot of forum members were involved in code or electronics in the service.
DUH!
What are you involved in now? :roll:

Did anyone else enjoy "Burn before reading?"
T.[/img]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 6:33 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 906
Location: Johnston,R.I.
I always thought it was a bit of an oxymoron to lump "Code copying" and "electronics" into the same category. My so-called apptitude test "fit" me for "Electronics".....and after basic training, upon getting my orders, I learned that I was to take code for the next 4.5 years! Not quite my envisionment of electronics. But, take code I did. Although not in any war zone, I DID serve my country and am proud of that fact today. My hats off to all that serve today.... especially so, in these difficult times.
Joe


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 9:21 pm 
Member

Joined: May Wed 06, 2009 7:01 pm
Posts: 623
Lots of ex ASA who served in Germany have placed info on the web. I was not there but my R-390 was.

Image

Fortunately it came with its final Equipment Inspection and Maintenance Worksheet which caused its honorable discharge from the 184th USASA Opns Co A on date 9048 with a short list of reasons, all of which I resolved shortly after purchasing the radio allowing it to continue being "Always Vigilant".

The web info tells me that 184th USASA Opns Co A was in Rothwesten.
A note on the report states the R-390 was 'Replaced' and its 'Condition Code' as "G"

QUESTIONS: Can anyone interpret the date of 9048 and/ or Condition Code "G", or Type Inspection "TI" for me?

Thanks (and thanks for your service),

--Rich


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Wed 28, 2010 9:57 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 906
Location: Johnston,R.I.
Just a guess about the date code 9048 - 48th week of 1990?? Seems like that's the way they date coded stuff back then.
Joe


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Thu 29, 2010 12:46 am 
Member

Joined: May Wed 06, 2009 7:01 pm
Posts: 623
JoeinRI wrote:
Just a guess about the date code 9048 - 48th week of 1990?? Seems like that's the way they date coded stuff back then.
Joe


Good guess. However, USASA did not exist in 1990. ASA as such ceased in 1976. INSCOM took its place.

--Rich


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Apr Thu 29, 2010 1:07 am 
Silent Key
User avatar

Joined: Feb Wed 03, 2010 1:01 am
Posts: 5110
Location: Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933
For all interested, Just type Army Security Agency in search and you will be amazed at what you find. There are web sites for almost all stations that were ASA.

We were a rauncy bunch of guys. Especially out side of CONUS. We were the poor labor for the NSA. They told the Army to give us almost anything we wanted to keep us happy. At times we looked like hippies in olive drab.

It was an experience I will never forget. "badges, badges, we don't need no stinkin badges." Top Secret

I started a website way back in 95 or 96 about the 7thRRFS (Radio Research Field Station) in Udorn Thailand. It got to be to much to handle so I turned it over to another former ASAer.
You can view it at: http://www.83rdrrsou.org/newhomepage.htm. I spent 3 years there and 6 months in Vietnam and got out in "71" and went to work for "Uncle."


There are links to many other places.

_________________
ka9cwk


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 30 posts ]  Moderator: pixellany Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: BobAnder, Eickerman, Fred Scoles, melw44, snogcel, Stan Ski, Yahoo [Bot] and 12 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  
















Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB