Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives :: Books
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Nov Thu 27, 2014 11:54 pm


All times are UTC [ DST ]



Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 8 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Signal Generator
PostPosted: Jun Wed 30, 2010 2:29 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Sat 04, 2009 7:45 am
Posts: 398
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Greetings to all,
I just recently purchased an Ig-102 signal generator that had a stripped knob that needs repair (I was given my money back plus the generator). I could not find the knob that was needed and have to repair it. It has to be repaired, re-capped, new leads and connections, and then adjusting it. I will eventually have to purchase a frequency counter to complete the process and hope it all works.
I am still a newbie and working two jobs at 55, I am wondering is it even worth all the time and money for all of that VS. buying a new solid state with a built in frequency counter.
I would appreciate your opinions considering nostalgia, value, and accuracy.
If anyone can recommend a good, inexpensive generator with a frequency counter that’s applicable to antique radio work, I would greatly appreciate it.
Thank you,
Vinny A.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Wed 30, 2010 3:53 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2756
Location: The Right Corner of Texas, 75451
It really depends on what you want the SG to do and how obsessive you are. There were numerous small repair shops that worked for years and repairmen fed their families using little more than cheap Heath Kits and Knight Kits. At least for now there are still plenty of radio stations at known frequencies to use as calibration points for those types of SGs and the results are quite adequate for most of the old sets we work with.

The appeal of this hobby is that one can get a huge amount of enjoyment and expertise with a minimal cash outlay.

_________________
Ron Mc/


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Wed 30, 2010 5:25 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Fri 19, 2009 6:34 pm
Posts: 4305
Location: Long Island
Comparing an IG-102 to a modern digital readout generator is kind of like comparing a skate board to a bicycle. You can use either one to get around the block, but the experience is going to be different, depending on which one you pick!

The Heath IG-102 is a hobbyist kit generator, and is comparable to many others by EICO, PACO, Lafayette, Knight, etc., etc. They are readily available and usually inexpensive. And most of them are quite simple, using just a couple of common tubes and a few caps, so they are easy to take care of.

The down-side is that this type of generator is usually not very accurate or stable. A frequency counter is helpful--though not absolutely necessary--to have in this connection. Output level is not calibrated, and is none too strong. Nor is modulation, for that matter. But if you are looking to fix up and align AM broadcast band and consumer short wave radios, an IG-102 or the like will work just fine.

You can buy a new solid state RF service generator, which will be more accurate and stable, but be prepared to pay $150 to $200 for a basic one with an analog dial. Models with digital frequency counter read-outs are out there too, but they are typically more money. Some posts to this forum have reported reliability issues with some of the newer Chinese digital generators, so if you go this route, try to find one from a recognized company like Sencore, B&K, Leader, Tenma, and so forth.

What most folks would recommend is, fix up your IG-102, or find another generator like it if that one is too far gone. Get comfortable using it on basic AM/SW radios. When you get to the point where you want to tackle FM alignments, communications receivers, or VHF and UHF gear, you'll be ready to trade up to a more sophisticated signal generator.

_________________
"Hell, there are no rules here--we're trying to accomplish something!"

Thomas A. Edison


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Wed 30, 2010 5:42 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: May Mon 18, 2009 5:55 pm
Posts: 2474
Location: Erie, PA
That is excellent advice. Moving up from a hobby generator to even an older used digital readout generator like an HP 8640B is a big step- like $30-50 for a hobby job to around $250+ for a decent working 8640B. A true synthesized signal generator will likely be $350-400+ for a decent older one. People here seem to be sucking up older Sencore SG-165 analog service generators like water as a very good all around signal generator for radio repair work. Their prices range around $150-250. Starting with something small and working your way up is the best way to go, at least from the financial standpoint when starting out. I recommend the RCA WR-50B as a good starter signal generator for AM radios. It was made up through the mid 70’s and has a reasonably clean sine wave output that is better than most of the hobby generators and good stability after warm up.

-Mark-


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Thu 01, 2010 6:50 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Sat 04, 2009 7:45 am
Posts: 398
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Gentlemen, thank you for your replies and your advice.
My sentiments are with yours, I just wanted to know what all you guys and gals were using. I am very much into nostalgia, family history, and love old radios.
I will attempt to repair the IG-102.
Thank you again,
Vinny A.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Fri 02, 2010 12:51 am 
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 8322
Location: Latham NY
did you mean the set screw for a knob was stripped?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Fri 02, 2010 4:15 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Sat 04, 2009 7:45 am
Posts: 398
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Lou, the plastic knob itself is stripped, the screw appears to be OK.
Thank you,
Vinny A.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Fri 02, 2010 6:03 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Oct Sun 18, 2009 5:38 am
Posts: 3295
Location: Tyler, Texas 75707-4212
Vinny, I thought of another alternative for the repair of that knob. I don't know if this will be practical for you, but here goes: Find an industrial fastener house that carries what is called a T/S-1 (that stands for Tapping Screw - Type 1) in the size larger than your set screw. For example, if it is 8-32, use a 10-32. Buy a single (they'll probably give it to you) 10-32 x 3/4 or 1" long HWH (Hex Washer Head) screw. It will function as a one time use tap that when used with a nutdriver, can be run into the stripped plastic hole in the knob. Run it all the way through, then back it out. Then a standard cup point socket set screw will thread right in where the old one was. No special tools or hassle drilling the knob this way. A type F will also work, but it won't cut as clean a thread as the type 1. The type one has a slot cut off center on the tapered end ot the screw so that it cuts as it is screwed in. The type F has 4 slots, but they are rolled into the tapered section after it is threaded, so it isn't as clean. They are for two different applications.

I don't know how easy/hard it is for you to get to such a supply house, and I don't know if Lowe's and those places carry them. Kind of doubt it.


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 8 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: fifties and 8 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  
















Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB