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 Post subject: My Regenerodyne receiver
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 4:26 am 
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I have seen mentioned the Regenerodyne receiver design by Gary Johanson. Here are a few pics of my rendition. I have made a few slight changes to the original circuit. The detector or IF tunes just below 2.5 mhz to 4 mhz. I can use it as a regen to pick up WWV at 2.5 mhz and the 80 mtr Amateur band. I have crystals to give me coverage from 4.5 mhz to 16 mhz in superhet mode. There are three antenna coils wound to cover from 2.5 - 16 mhz since I could only fit a 150 pf variable cap under the chassis for the preselector. The original design called out a 365 pf cap. I might try winding another antenna coil with #16 wire with just a turn or two to go 15 mtrs or mabey even 10 mtrs.

The performance is outstanding for a simple superhet, or regen with xtal converter, however you want to look at it. Not any more complicated then building a three tube regen too.

Ok, here comes the pics.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

John
KB7NRN


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 4:42 am 
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Very, very nice job!! :) Kudos...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 4:56 am 
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Excellent!

-BM


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 4:59 am 
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Sweet!

How many hours of use will that string of 9volt batteries last?

Steve


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 5:48 am 
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Outstanding! Nice steel cabinet too.

73's


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 8:47 am 
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That is one of the most outstanding jobs of a home brew I have ever seen!!! Looks wonderful!! Could you build me one? PM me, and let me know. I'd really love to have one...It's a beuty, no doubt!!
Bill Cahill

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 1:35 pm 
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That's pretty. I don't recall ever seeing a non-reduction window dial like that. Who made it?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 2:40 pm 
Silent Key

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Boy, that 6C5G sure is obvious! Looks darn good! The radio, that is.
Curt

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 5:49 pm 
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Location: Houston Texas USA
John, et al...

Nicely done...I like it for a lot of reasons, both in terms of your construction, your brief description of operation and its seemingly good stability in the lower and middle HF frequencies.

At first I thought your coils were positioned too closely to edge of your chassis but on closer examination I see what appears to be about a 1/2-inch gap between the metal cabinet and edge of the chassis, so perhaps no ill effect.

I'm as curious as Alan about the window dial he asked about...Never have seen one before.

Thanks, John.

Bruce
WC5CW


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 6:54 pm 
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Thanks guys for the kind comments, they mean alot because I've seen some of the work you gus have done!

Steve,
Didn't measure the life of the batteries in hours, just measured the voltage now and then. Used the same batts for two other really vintage radios projects so they do last a long time.
Ended up building an AC power supply. Since this was my first project with AC tubes I under estimated the use of hum reduceing features like grounding one side of the filament string to the chassis and adding bypass caps on the power transformer and at the filament pins on the tube sockets, using filament transformer with center tap grounded. Consequently I had a hum issue at first so I looked in the books, mostly old ARRL Handbooks, on how to reduce the hum. I even went as far as rectifieing & filtering the filament supply. Now it plays jsut as good on AC as on DC, no hum.

DXer,
The steel cabinet is an old Bud cabinet I found at a ham swapmeet. As soon as I saw it I knew what it would be used for. I bought a buncha things from this guy I got the cabinet from. Ya know how you'll pick through the stuff on the table or under, make a pile then ask the guy "how much for all this junk". When I looked inside the cabinet there was two old telephone handsets, I almost tossed them aside but took a better look and found them to be Western Electric E1 hand sets with the "split cup" trnasmitter. One set was never used, the cord was neatly coiled up and had a tag on it. No signs of screws being tightened on the fork terminals. The other was used but in excellent shape. I showed them to the guy I was buying this pile from and he didn't change his price. What a deal I thought. I used the E1 hand sets to trade up (with some cash) to a complete WE 102 with ringer box, everything restored!
Ya never know what you might find at a swap meet.

Here's a pic of the R-dyne to the right, WE 102 to the left, R-dyne supply behind the phone. Oh, the the big thing is my MOARE, Mother of all Regens. the RAL receiver and supply. Above right is just a glimps of my TCS set. Lower right under the bench is the TCS AC supply, original too. Pretty much the main operating position at station KB7NRN.
Image

Bill Cahill,
Wellll.... these projects are more of a work of art for me, they really take time and effort finding just the right parts. Construction is something that takes time too, not the acutal assembly but all the thinking and mulling it over in my mind and I have to be in a certin mood or frame of mind when I put it all togetrer. Work progresses in stages and the thing might sit for a while, sometimes years. Duplicating a project can be a daunting task since most of the parts are vintage and found hear and there. I've only sold one radio and built another for a friend. As well I work a full time job and am rasing a family at the same time so time is at a primium.
Thanks for your appreciation for my work but I would have to decline your offer in light of the things stated above.

Alan,
You know I've not seen another dial like this either. Don't remeber where I got it from but I do remember when I saw it I thought it would make a great bandset dial and that's what it's used for here on the R-dyne.

I took the R-dyne to a swapmeet recently for show and tell item to my friends. A few people came up and asked if it was an SW-3!! Not quite!

John
KB7NRN


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 7:55 pm 
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Bruce,
The pics are deceiving, there's actually 1.25" from the coils to the back or sides of the cabinet. On simple circuits I like to lay them out symetrical as well as logical. Keeping the coils well apart and away from the tubes was the main goal.
Image

For those wondering what the control layout is it goes like this; Upper left, bandset. Upper middle, bandspread. Upper right, regeneration. Lower left, preselector. Lower right, audio mute. Originally this control was for switching between two xtals that are contained in the aluminum can with the red RCA symbol on top. The can is a two channel temp controlled xtal oven from old tube type commercial RCA FM tranceivers. I have a buncha these from my time spent as a tech at a Land Mobile Repair shop. The ovens hold two HC-6 xtals with a heating element between and all mounted on an octal base. I found that my selection of FT-243 xtals gave me better coverage so I just plug them into the octal socket and rewired the xtal switch to cut the B+ from the audio section of the 6SN7.

I usually run the audio from the R-dyne through a matching transformer into a 10 watt tube amp for plenty of audio. Eventhough I have some boatanchor military rigs, the R-dyne gets the most use, then the RAL.

John,
KB7NRN


Last edited by War Bird Radio on Jun Mon 26, 2006 4:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 24, 2006 9:53 pm 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
John- also a very nice looking TCS setup with original cables and the proper antenna connector on the transmitter! What TCS model is it? I used a TCS-12 setup for a number of years, but what I have now is the TCS-14 setup if I remember correctly with matching serial numbers on the receiver and transmitter. I also have a couple of TCS-13 transmitters if I remember correctly. It is all in storage along with the dynamotor power supplies.
Curt

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sun 25, 2006 12:31 am 
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Curt,
That's a TCS-5 set. Restored at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in the early '60s. It has matching serial #'s too. They were still using them during the Vietnam War. Had this set for almost 10 years now. Been mostly used on 160 mtrs (1.945) and occsionally on 80 & 40 mtrs.
Image

Here is a TCS-12 set I bought last year at a local swapmeet for $25. Again it has matching serial #'s and the original racking for verticle installation. Haven't tried to fire it up yet.
Image

John
KB7NRN


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sun 25, 2006 1:04 am 
Silent Key

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
John- the first TCS-12 setup that the local radio club had back in the early 1960's was vertical mounted just like that. I had so much fun with that setup that it became the reason for me being interested in them like I am today. I have the heavy base mounts for them, but lack the vertical supports that bolt them together. Someday I will get lucky and find them.

Interesting that it came from Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. When I was in the Navy, my duty station was mainly NAS Seattle at Sandpoint Naval Air Station. That was from 1966 thru 1969. I never did get a chance to operate K7NAR, the base ham station. But I had an AN/ARC-2 HF transceiver at home for my main rig at the time. One time, with time on my hands, I ventured over to the AO shack, or aviation ordinance and for some reason I have been unable to figure out, they had a TCS-12 setup with the vertical mounts in the shack. What it was used for, or why remains a mystery to me. The AT (aviation electronics technician) shack topside had an AN/ARC-2 serving as a doorstop! Made me feel quite a bit at home back in those days.
Curt

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sun 25, 2006 1:33 pm 
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>>an AN/ARC-2 serving as a doorstop!

"Boatanchor" does sound classier than "doorstop" or "wheel chock."


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sun 25, 2006 3:22 pm 
Silent Key

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Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
Yep, believe it or not. It was the door stop to the door that opened into the screened room where all the testing of the transmitters was conducted. Guess they didn't want to interfere with any aircraft communications, thus the screened room. When I first saw that, I about fell on my face! The squadron cheif asked me what was I staring at and I told him that in my ham station at home, that was my main rig.
Curt

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Mon 26, 2006 4:22 pm 
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Location: Watsonville, CA, US
Wow. Outstanding! I have been fiddling with my own version.

http://antiqueradios.com/gallery/view_p ... id=SGAdyne

I had hoped to make a radio worth saving and out of the experimental stage. This one is my third verstion. I actually ended up with a 6sl7 and a 6v6 in the audio section. For some reason, I can not understand, I can not get enough audio to drive a speaker. I have not had this trouble in the past. I am also having trouble getting the it to mix properly. I am so mad at it that I shelved it for now. I will get back to it some day.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Mon 26, 2006 4:51 pm 
Silent Key

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Location: Sandpoint, IDAHO 83864
That is odd that you can't get enough audio to drive a speaker with a 6V6! You must have a defective part or something is not what it is supposed to be, like an output transformer that is not what you think it might be.
Curt

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Mon 26, 2006 5:00 pm 
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Scott,
You might try building a new one or rebuilding yours to the orginal design and once working start modifing it one stage at a time. This way you can tell what's going on and make it easier to troubleshoot.

John
KB7NRN


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Mon 26, 2006 5:43 pm 
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Location: Watsonville, CA, US
Thanks for the suggestions,

I have completely rebuilt the audios section twice and tried three differet detectors. I have made a bunch of regens and several regenerodynes. This problem is new to me. This one is the second "fancied up" regenerodyne. The first fancy one got down to 10-Meters and was a fair CB band RX. A hint here is that to get to the higher frequencies you will need to add more signal. Once you add an RF amp you will need an input attenuator for lower bands. You will also need a BCB filter. Too much RF in will let BCB in too.

Anyway for now, I need to shelve the project and move onto other stuff. The frustraton level is too high. The wife is getting upset with me spending so much time on it. We have a 2-year old so I need to help with the boy and the house.


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