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 Post subject: Packard Bell
PostPosted: Jul Sun 15, 2007 5:27 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Brentwood, CA
Why did Packard Bell use a double slide rule dial (with the same scale) on each side on some of their models, such as models 602 and 661? The dual dial pointers move across the scales on each side at exactly the same frequency.

Grampibear


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Sun 15, 2007 6:11 pm 
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Location: Chicago, IL, USA
Maybe because it was one of the worst implementations of a stationized dial? It looks like one half of the dial was for the west coast, and the other for the east coast stations.

Methinks better spacing across the entire dial would have been a more elegant solution.


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PostPosted: Jul Sun 15, 2007 7:35 pm 
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Location: Brentwood, CA
I think you are on the right track. I enlarged one of the pictures in the photo gallery and it shows the left hand scale for the Southwest and the right hand scale for the Northwest (sorry Indiana and the rest of the country). Maybe Packard Bell only intended these radios for the West coast market.


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PostPosted: Jul Sun 15, 2007 8:21 pm 
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Location: Warren, MI, USA 48093-6744 N42.50973 W83.02633
I think the worst implementation of the stationized tuning was a Japanese radio from the early 70's - it LOOKED like three bands - but was actually just two. The AM band was split (on the dial scale) at about 850. The middle scale was marked "Sports" and went from 540 to 850. The bottom scale was marked "Music" and it went from 850 to 16??

The middle scale had no graduation after 850, and the bottom scale had no gradu8ation before 850.

I think this was also one that had like 18 transistors, but only about 7 or 8 actually did anything, the others were just soldered in there for looks.

And I'm sure it actually sold extra radios...

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Mon 16, 2007 7:34 am 
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Joined: Apr Sun 08, 2007 6:47 am
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Location: British Columbia
I have a 771 Packard Bell with a double scale dial, one has Pacific Northwest, with all of the station call letters, and the other scale has California stations. Below the California scale is the wavelength in meters, below the Pacific Northwset scale is a shortwave band. The dial is nearly two feet long so it must have been somewhat of an attraction, the cabinet is rather plain but well constructed with a lot of solid wood used. Unfortubately the set is sitting in a box in drydock, needing the cabinet shoulders replaced.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jul Mon 16, 2007 7:38 am 
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Joined: Apr Sun 08, 2007 6:47 am
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Location: British Columbia
HuggyBear;
I have a set like that from the later half of the 1960s called a North American, it has 18 transistors but many are connected as diodes, I think that only 10 or 12 actually work as transistors. It was made in Hong Kong


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