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$1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!
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Author:  Bugatti [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 1:17 am ]
Post subject:  $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

I found this old General Electric clock radio at a guy's booth at a local flea market. I asked how much and he said $5 if it works. Well, we plugged it in and the clock worked fine, but the radio had no sound, until we were unplugging it. Odd. I plugged it in again and this time, the radio worked if I banged on top of it. Then he said how about $1 and I couldn't pass it up. I got home and I plugged it in and now the radio works for some reason, but it's a little quiet but it gets louder if I put my hand on the top of it. I tried googling the model number and tried searching for it on Radio Museum but I couldn't find an exact match, although I did find one similar. I believe it's from around 1966/1967. I tried cleaning the front but there's this glue or something that wont come off the front plastic panel.

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Author:  Bugman [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 1:31 am ]
Post subject:  Re: $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

You are correct, it is 1966 or '67. See if your local library has access to Sam's Photofacts. The service information is in Sam's Photofact 871, Folder 6. Mine stop much earlier than that or I would scan the folder for you and forward it. If your library doesn't have the Sam's, post a Wanted here on ARF. Someone is likely to have that set on hand.
I wouldn't recommend running it until you at least swap out the Filter capacitors and preferably the paper caps also. If you saw the clock running and you got some noise out of it, it should be a fairly easy fix.

Author:  Bugatti [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 1:41 am ]
Post subject:  Re: $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

Bugman wrote:
You are correct, it is 1966 or '67. See if your local library has access to Sam's Photofacts. The service information is in Sam's Photofact 871, Folder 6. Mine stop much earlier than that or I would scan the folder for you and forward it. If your library doesn't have the Sam's, post a Wanted here on ARF. Someone is likely to have that set on hand.
I wouldn't recommend running it until you at least swap out the Filter capacitors and preferably the paper caps also. If you saw the clock running and you got some noise out of it, it should be a fairly easy fix.


Thanks! I will do that when I get around to it. And I think i'm gonna keep it all original for now. The radio works mostly fine, just a little quieter than I think it should be. There is also a very quiet hum when the radio is on, probably from the filter capacitor. But it's barely audible when the radio is on. I think the antenna might be a little cheap because when I put my hand on top of the cabinet, it it gets louder. I opened it up and it's a ferrite rod antenna right at the top of the cabinet.

Author:  westcoastjohn [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 2:44 am ]
Post subject:  Re: $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

It is starving for love. :lol:
Actually, new caps might help the low volume issue, but if not, the other thing that could be weak is the output transistors.

Be careful if changing parts, not to break traces on the circuit board. It sounds like there may be a loose connection already, so look for it when you dive in. Could be bad contacts in the switch or volume control, need cleaning.

It is no disgrace to leave the leads of the old part long and hook your new component to the stubs.

Author:  35Z5 [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 3:25 am ]
Post subject:  Re: $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

Mostly transistors work or they don't, by '67 were fairly reliable(especially if they are silicon). It likely should have electrolytics replaced, probably values in it anywhere from 5mfd@25v to maybe something like 1000 mfd@ 25v in P/S. Paper caps were mostly history by '67.

Since hand capacitance increases volume, it probably needs the trimmer adj on tuning cap(larger section, smaller will be osc). Proper adj is usually pick a weak station around 1400 and adj for max volume.

Author:  Findm-Keepm [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 4:58 am ]
Post subject:  Re: $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

The '66 Beitman manual has the C1410/1411/1412, probably pretty close:

https://www.americanradiohistory.com/Ar ... n-1966.pdf

Page 33 (PDF pagination...)

Author:  egg [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 5:08 am ]
Post subject:  Re: $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

Model C555A in volume 1965 might even be closer. Lol
https://www.americanradiohistory.com/Beitman-Manual.htm

Greg.

Author:  fifties [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 5:37 am ]
Post subject:  Re: $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

It's not unusual for the volume to increase when placing a hand near the antenna coil, either an air loop or a ferrite core.

Author:  wazz [ Mar Wed 13, 2019 3:05 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: $1 Flea market find! Any information would be helpful!

The quick and dirty way to find the "loose connection" in a radio like that is to touch or press components with an insulated tool and see if any particular wire or component causes the loss of reception or static or any intermittent behavior. Your insulated tool must be a true insulator, not something like a screwdriver with tape on it or something. Not a danger to you with a transistor set but a short circuit from a tool could be dangerous to the radio. And then, in tube sets with higher voltages, it could be dangerous to you too. Something like a plastic rod or plastic alignment tool. Or phenolic or other known non conductor. You might get away with wood in a transistor set but in a very high voltage situation, possibly a piece of bare wood could absorb moisture. You are poking around, not using enough force to damage things physically. The only difficult thing to find this way may be a cracked trace in a printed circuit board. Or a bad internally pot or sealed tuning cap. Clock radios also have a switch that allows the clock to turn the radio on as an alarm besides the regular on off switch. That switch or switches could have a dirty connection inside.

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