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 Post subject: Re: Slipping Dial Cord Fix
PostPosted: Mar Sat 23, 2019 2:13 pm 
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Joined: Dec Tue 23, 2014 6:51 pm
Posts: 1442
Location: N. Palm Bch, Fl.
On the East Coast it's (Same Avenue).
On the West Coast it's (Similar Circles).
:roll:

Freeman


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 Post subject: Re: Slipping Dial Cord Fix
PostPosted: Mar Sat 23, 2019 2:43 pm 
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Joined: Feb Thu 28, 2019 7:48 pm
Posts: 404
Location: Lawrenceville, Illinois 62439
Been a problem for decades.
This was in dad's stash. Walsco brand dial cord friction stick. It actually helps on 'barely slipping' situations. Simply capacitor wax probably.


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 Post subject: Re: Slipping Dial Cord Fix
PostPosted: Mar Tue 26, 2019 9:43 pm 
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Joined: Nov Fri 10, 2006 12:24 am
Posts: 2533
Location: Thornhill, Ontario, Canada
I recently refurbished a cheap circa 1967 s/s clock-radio, a SONY 8FC-45W. I had to put in a new dial cord, but it kept slipping whatever I did (extra turns on shaft, tightened spring, cleaning shaft.) Finally, I put a short length of heat shrink over the grooved shaft... perfect grip. Cord does not "ride-up" (an initial concern, but I may have removed one wrap turn... can't remember.) Anyway, it stays in the spindle groove. I guess the word kluge applies!
Cheers,
Roger

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Roger Jones,
Thornhill, Ontario
Ontario Vintage Radio Assoc. http://www.ovra.ca


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 Post subject: Re: Slipping Dial Cord Fix
PostPosted: Apr Thu 18, 2019 11:00 pm 
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Joined: Apr Thu 21, 2011 2:00 am
Posts: 4324
Location: Georgia, 30236
I keep a little block of bees' wax in the fridge. That seems to put a grip on things.

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"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
— Arthur C. Clarke


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 Post subject: Re: Slipping Dial Cord Fix
PostPosted: Oct Sun 27, 2019 3:35 pm 
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Joined: Sep Thu 26, 2019 1:56 am
Posts: 126
Location: Peterborough, New Hampshire, 03458 USA
When I got into restoring antique radios earlier this year, I thought it would be a nice stress-free hobby. That was before I had to replace a broken dial cord yesterday. I didn't know it could lead to hair loss and other maladies. The first problem was the dial cord diagram on the SAMS schematics for my model didn't match my model. It couldn't possibly work the way it was drawn. Of course, it took a while to figure that out.

Once I had it strung properly, it worked but slipped a little in one direction. I tried some of the posted solutions, but they didn't completely resolve things. In fact, a couple of them made things worse. I think what works on one radio might not work so well on another. It depends on how the manufacturer has the pulleys aligned. In my case, an extra wrap around the tuning shaft caused the cord to ride over top the other windings but only in one direction. The top pulley just isn't aligned straight enough to the tuning shaft. So, back to 3 turns as noted in the SAMS.

Then I tried taking the glaze off the tuning shaft with 220 paper. That also caused the windings to overlap, because then they didn't slide inward on the shaft. I rebuffed the shaft with 600 paper and at least then the cord didn't overlap.

After several hours of handling the new cord, I thought I might have gotten it contaminated with natural oil from my fingers. So, I washed my hands, cut a new cord and started over. But this time I also cleaned all the pulleys with denatured alcohol. I also cleaned places on the chassis where the cord might pick up oil/dirt while trying to install it. Another thing I did this time was making sure the tension on both strings going to the spring was exactly the same.

Viola! Now it works perfectly. No capacitor wax, no rosin, completely dry. I'm hoping it won't be this difficult the next time I have to fix a dial cord.

One thing I'm wondering about - is it possible some of the new dial cord material just doesn't have as much "grip" as the older cord? I do notice a difference with a magnifying glass. The old cord has a finer weave and is a little stiffer than the new cord. The new cord is softer and more flexible, but I didn't notice any stretchiness to it.

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Peterborough, New Hampshire USA


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 Post subject: Re: Slipping Dial Cord Fix
PostPosted: Oct Sun 27, 2019 4:33 pm 
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Joined: Nov Mon 05, 2007 11:08 pm
Posts: 2908
Location: Calgary Alberta
I have found that the capacitor wax melted and run across the dial string does work for me.

GREAT MINDS THINK ALIKE ,,FOOLS SELDOM DIFFER.
Dan in Calgary


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