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 Post subject: Make your own SPLICERS
PostPosted: Dec Wed 05, 2007 8:57 pm 
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Location: Sterling Heights, Michigan 48314, USA
A posting by another member about the unavailability of SPLICERS got me to thinking about how to make my own. This would be a good project to work on while watching your favorite sports event etc. Wouldn't take long to make several dozen of these things....I used my Quiggle Tool (which was sent to me by one of our fellow members) to make the splicers.

Here is a photo tutorial........I figured this might be particularly helpful to those folks who are new to the hobby.

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Edited to replace missing photo

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Last edited by Dennis Wess on Sep Sun 25, 2011 12:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Wed 05, 2007 10:15 pm 
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And you can use the tool to just directly "quiggle" the lead on the new replacement component to slip it over the stub wire without having to use an intermediate "splicer" at all, if you're really cramped for space in a tight chassis.

"Quiggle on, Garth"!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Thu 06, 2007 7:57 pm 
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Awsome Tip Dennis! I'm going to build some this weekend just to keep my hands busy! Thanks for the pictoral tutorial too! Nice job!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Thu 06, 2007 8:02 pm 
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Location: advance,mo 63730
dennis not to sound ignorant but whats the purpose cant you solder the resistor or cap lead direct?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Thu 06, 2007 10:11 pm 
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Rubberchicken wrote:
dennis not to sound ignorant but whats the purpose cant you solder the resistor or cap lead direct?


Hmmmm........how to answer............

Most of the time I will use my Quiggle tool to build a coil right on the end of the cap or resistor leads (as Chuck mentioned).........but for those times when it's not possible, the splicers are a blessing.

I don't use them all the time when redoing a chassis....I'd use them by the hundreds if I did that. If I can unsolder or clean up a terminal to enable me to make a nice solder connection........great. Or if I can Quiggle the end of the cap or resistor lead as mentioned.

But.......there are times when splicers come in handy.

For instance........say you are troubleshooting and want to snip one lead of a capacitor so that you can isolate it from the circuit and attached a substitute temporarily to see if you can correct the problem. If that doesn't fix things, you'll want to replace the original capacitor right ? You can try to wrangle your small needle nose pliers down in there to hopefully bend a couple of nice "J" bends to the ends of the leads, or maybe just get the two leads side-by-side for a mm or two and solder them (not recommended)....or you can just slip a splicer on the wire sticking up from the terminal and insert the cap lead into it also, then solder.......nice, neat and dependable. (That's what was done in photo #8 of the tutorial).

I've seen solder blobs attaching a component that were way too huge............someone had wrapped a cap or resistor lead around an existing blob and just added more solder on top of it.

Just depends on how neat and orderly you want the finished job to look I guess............not to mention making it easier to attach components in tight areas.

Now......this is just MY opinion of course and there are lots of methods used by everyone.......

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Fri 07, 2007 12:44 am 
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I remember using this fix as an appreentice in auto radio in the 30's so there is nothing new under the sun, is there?
Regards, Howard


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Fri 07, 2007 12:52 am 
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Dennis:
Just wondering, any reason a person couldn't just use small springs? That's what those look like even though I know they're not. Small springs can be had in quantity pretty cheap.

Terry

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Fri 07, 2007 1:00 am 
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dennis thanks for the reply i can see were they come in handy ill have to try them

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Fri 07, 2007 1:00 am 
Silent Key

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Ever tried to solder to a spring? "nuf said.

Most springs are going to be too big for the wires and they usually don't like to take solder. Remember that the quig becomes a part of the soldered joint.
Curt

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Fri 07, 2007 1:02 am 
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Dues to metal type and/or any existing plating, plain old "springs" may not solder or "tin" properly. You'd have to try a sample. Those would be really small diameter springs though to have an inside diameter of a 20AWG wire, or so.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Tue 11, 2007 2:33 am 
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Chuck Schwark wrote:
Those would be really small diameter springs though to have an inside diameter of a 20AWG wire, or so.


Ever seen some of the springs in a firearm ? Some are really small. Many gun springs are made from carbon steel and should solder okay. I'll try one and let you know.

Terry

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Tue 11, 2007 3:30 am 
Silent Key

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Now we don't need anybody soldering up the op spring on a Garand! How would you ever get the Garand thumb if it was all soldered up?
Curt

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Tue 11, 2007 4:12 am 
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specops56 wrote:
Many gun springs are made from carbon steel and should solder okay.


Would springs such as these be expensive..relatively speaking I mean ?

I've been working at the bench tonight and found that my quickest way to make splicers is to use plain ol' buss wire....it works great and is just about the same diameter as the commercially made splicers from yesteryear. You can make a lot of those little critters from a roll of buss wire.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Dec Wed 12, 2007 3:56 am 
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Location: Salinas, CA, USA
I make these as I need them. The time involved is miniscule and I don't clutter up my bench with more junk. Besides these old tired eyes have trouble locating them it they are in any quantity. These do a good job if done right and the appearance is not at all bad.
Regards. Howard


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Tue 05, 2008 5:54 am 
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Joined: Dec Sun 16, 2007 4:59 am
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Location: Minnetonka, MN 55305
Hi Dennis,

Amazing set of photos and instructions. If we could convince you to use your talent for an illustrated radio repair course we'd all be geniuses. Just yesterday a member of our Northland Antique Radio Club gave a talk on constructing his own quiggle tool using a small diameter pvc tube, music wire and some small brass rod.

He made a sufficient quantity to provide all of us with one of our own. I used it yesterday and it worked very well. Your device is more robust. He didn't mention making the coil sleeves for slipping over clipped ends as you describe. Very clever.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Wed 13, 2008 11:53 pm 
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Very helpful post.
Thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mar Wed 19, 2008 9:38 pm 
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I was lucky to find a bunch of original ones. They're by Sprague, and named 'Kwikettes'.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: May Wed 14, 2008 11:51 pm 
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Joined: Dec Sun 23, 2007 7:20 pm
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Location: Georgia
I have used these connectors for years. The Xacto Knife is a good idea.

I have used a wire wrap gun to make them for a very long time. The gun is quick and you can make them very fast.

Probably not worth buying a wire wrap gun to make them however.

Howard K5JCP


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: May Thu 15, 2008 12:43 am 
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Location: North Fork, CA 93643
This is terrific and thanks for posting! I will definitely try this.

I have been "cheating" sometimes by making my own "twist" connections on the leads of caps by winding them slowly around a jeweler's screwdriver tip and soldering that on a clipped-off lead in a chassis when things were just too tight.

This is why I love this place!

Charlie


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 Post subject: Re: Make your own SPLICERS
PostPosted: Sep Tue 10, 2019 1:13 am 
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