Forums :: NEW! Web Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Oct Sun 02, 2022 9:34 am


All times are UTC





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Teac A-100 belts
PostPosted: Aug Sun 07, 2022 8:27 pm 
Member

Joined: Jul Thu 16, 2020 7:44 pm
Posts: 517
Location: Moss Landing CA
I wanted to play an old tape today. No dice. The belts in my Teac have turned to goo. I see belt kits are available. The motor still runs. The unit is visually in outstanding condition inside and out.

I have lots of tapes I would like to play. Will they likely sound reasonable? The tape in question was made in 1978. It is of a family ancestor. It has been stored at moderate temperatures. Any chance it will still play at all?

Are there other parts that would have degraded other than the 4-belts in the kit? Caps, yeah, but it is a relative modern solid state device they should be OK?

In it's day this was a nice unit. Are they still considered to be worth working on?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Teac A-100 belts
PostPosted: Aug Sun 07, 2022 11:45 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Nov Sun 29, 2020 4:59 pm
Posts: 592
Location: Northeast Illinois
Location: Carol Stream, Illinois 60188
The A-100 was an entry level basic cassette deck. As long as the record/play head is not heavily worn, and the rubber pinch roller is not damaged or completely hardened, it is probably worth investing in the cost of a set of belts, especially since you already own it.
Only other common problem area (other than cleaning drive surfaces, and perhaps a bit of lube here and there) that frequently needs attention on most all tape recorders is the record/play switch. The many contacts on these multi-pole switches often become oxidized and can cause many different, often intermittent, problems. A shot of Caig D5 contact cleaner and exercising the switch is usually all that's needed to address this real or potential problem area.

- Jim


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Teac A-100 belts
PostPosted: Aug Mon 08, 2022 1:10 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Nov Wed 30, 2016 6:35 pm
Posts: 12662
Location: Sunbury, Ohio 43074
Location: Sunbury, Ohio 43074
One other thing, and you'll know this after replacing the belts, is sometimes the motor(s) get(s) fussy and need to be opened up, cleaned, polish the commutator, and lightly lube. Delicate but not difficult.

If yours has low hours, that's probably not going to be necessary. Examining the wear on the heads and guides will give you an idea how many hours its got on it.

The tapes, cassettes at least, are usually OK. I've seen plenty of Reel to Reel tapes either fused into a single piece, or flaking apart, so that can be more problematic.

_________________
Preserving the hist. of electronics, one boat anchor at a time! :)
https://www.bbtvtestequipment.com


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Teac A-100 belts
PostPosted: Aug Mon 08, 2022 3:17 pm 
Member

Joined: Jul Thu 16, 2020 7:44 pm
Posts: 517
Location: Moss Landing CA
My question on the tapes was referring to sound quality.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Teac A-100 belts
PostPosted: Aug Mon 08, 2022 11:29 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Nov Sun 29, 2020 4:59 pm
Posts: 592
Location: Northeast Illinois
Location: Carol Stream, Illinois 60188
Scota4570 wrote:
My question on the tapes was referring to sound quality.


The old cassette tapes have likely not deteriorated significantly from when they were recorded unless stored around strong magnetic fields. Sometimes some degree of a phenomenon known as "print-through" can occur which results in a faint echo being heard during playback in tapes stored for a long time.
Like Barry mentioned, the magnetic tape itself used in even low quality cassettes doesn't suffer from most of the physical deterioration associated with early reel to reel tapes such as shedding the oxide layer or the backing becoming brittle. The pressure pad that presses the tape against the head in cassettes is generally made of felt and are usually well adhered to the spring metal strip that holds it in place.

A quick visual inspection of the cassette itself and removing of any slack in the reels before inserting the tape in the machine is always good practice. I used to keep one of those older style bic pens that had a clear hex body handy for this task.


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  




































Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB