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 Post subject: Regarding the early Pioneers... Receivers
PostPosted: Oct Tue 24, 2006 10:14 pm 
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Location: Park Hills, MO 63601
Ok, don't give me that "look" again. But, I'd like a few polite answers/suggestions. I have noticed a few of the early Pioneer tube receivers have had relatively good reviews in some circles. The ones with separate tuners (and eye tubes) for the AM and FM bands are sometimes mentioned. I have seen a SX-34, and there was just a SM-Q140 that sold on eBay today.

1) Is there a list of similar old tube receivers somewhere? Could any of you name a few more with separate AM and FM sections?

2) I have noticed that Pioneer produced radios for other companies. For instance, the Allied 333 and Knight 333 receivers were repackaged Pioneer SX-34's. Are you aware of any more?

3) There is some minor interest in collecting these type receivers - even to the point of the discussion of competing audio output tube configurations. Are these really "collectible", or just some more "audio enthusiast" talk?

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From the banks of the Big River, currently living in the lapse of luxury!


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PostPosted: Oct Wed 25, 2006 3:30 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Rochester NY USA
I've seen a few - there was one with 7868 or 7591 output tubess at the last hamfest ($200 - no takers). I've seen a CD of Pioneer tube schematics offered by someone in Australia - I can dig up the web address if you're interested. Japan used dual FM channels for stereo, Australia used daul AM, and the US used AM-FM. So there are bunch of different dual-tuner models.

Kenwood (Trio) was the other maker of house-brand units - I have a Lafayette LR-800 made by them. I have two simulcast AM-FM tuners - a Bell and a Fisher. The Fisher 800B receiver is probably the best known one. And I've seen an awful lot of Stromberg SR445s... two attached chassis, completely separate on a common from panel.


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PostPosted: Oct Wed 25, 2006 5:22 pm 
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Thanks, Tom, for the info...and especially for not using " :roll: "

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Mike

From the banks of the Big River, currently living in the lapse of luxury!


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PostPosted: Oct Wed 25, 2006 6:10 pm 
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Location: Utica, NY 13502 (USA)
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Anytime one of these H. H. Scott 399's comes up on ebay it goes for big bucks. So there must be some major interest in these simulcast stereo (but not multiplex stereo) receivers. Scott also made several tuner-only and tuner/preamp simulcast models. I have a model 331-B which I like a lot because of it's selectable AM IF bandwidth.

I'm surprized how many and how often simulcast tuners show up on ebay. Seems like almost all of the Hi Fi component makers offered them before FM multiplex was introduced.

Dave


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PostPosted: Oct Fri 27, 2006 10:48 pm 
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Location: 98802
I would look over in the Pioneer forum at Audiokarma.org, where member Dr. Strangelove is compiling a database of pioneer components. I think it's a sticky in the forum. There should be a bunch of model numbers at least for the old Pioneer tube stuff.

I have one. I can't remember the model number, and it's packed away in a box somewhere. I bought it broken in about 1974. I thought it was a really good looking reciever. I still do. It's one of the black ones with two dials and two eye tubes. It blew the fuse when turned on.

The rectifier, I think a 5ar4, was shorted. I didn't have one, so I made one out of silicon. It played a little, and recieved FM, but sounded lousy in one channel. the other channel was dead and had a red plate. I moved the tubes around, always the same socket had the hot plate. As I recall (it has been a long time) , this wasn't capacitor leakage, but *every last resistor* in the output section was out of spec, most of them by several hundred percent.

This started looking like a big project, and I back burnered it and never got to it. In 1990 or so I traded it off to a friend. He bought it a real 5ar4 and a new set of output tubes. He never got around to fixing it either, and gave it back to me a few years later.

I suspect that all survivors suffer from some component drift. If mine was bad enough to be unusable by 1974, i'll bet most of its siblings at least have some bias problems, and probably dont sound that good.

The build quality of this thing is really nice, and it's worth doing. If you get one, plan on rebuilding it. :lol: I'll bet it has the potential to sound really good.

John


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