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 Post subject: Re: Old Radio Programs
PostPosted: Apr Wed 03, 2019 12:07 am 
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"The Voyage of the Scarlet Queen" is one of (if not the best radio serial ever) great serials during the Golden Age of Radio. Howard Duff played the part of Captain Carney in the first episode, but thereafter the role was played by Mr. Radio himself, Elliott Lewis.
And of course William "Bill" Conrad is in the serial not as a regular but can be heard in many of the episodes. :D
Elliott Lewis had the ability to make you believe whatever he said. He had the high energy role as the skipper on this high-adventure series. Lewis was completely convincing as seagoing ship's master Philip Carney-always believable and enthusiastic with his devoted crew.
So let a master captain of drama chart a course to exotic ports of call and thrilling adventures. All you have to do is step aboard The Scarlet Queen.


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 Post subject: Re: Old Radio Programs
PostPosted: Apr Mon 22, 2019 7:16 pm 
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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is considered one of the greatest tales of horror to date. George Edwards was one of the most underrated producers of the Golden Age Radio.
George Edwards has earned in Radio History the title of "The Man with a 1000 Voices".

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is just one of over 300 radio series and serials produced by George Edwards (primarily on Australian Radio) over the course of his twenty year career in radio. Telling Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic tale of a man divided, this fifteen minute serial debuted in 1943, running for 52 episodes, and was produced by Edwards, a well-known Australian radio personality. The man behind other Australian series, such as Afloat with Henry Morgan and Adventures of Marco Polo lent not only his production skills to Jekyll and Hyde, but shared his amazing vocal talents as well.
Edwards’ skill to do multiple voices in a single episode definitely fit the needs of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde is available in 2 Volumes, and is one of the best serial adventures of the radio era. The intense pacing of each episode as well as the high quality production values and the talented voice acting of George Edwards and the rest of the cast make this a must have for any fan of Classic Radio. I doubt there was ever any Radio Actor during the Golden Age of Radio that could change his voice and play as many different parts in a single production as was the case with George Edwards.
A photo below shows George Edwards with evidently his pet dog in his later years. George Edwards was probably the most versatile actor in the History of Radio.
He passed away in 1953.


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 Post subject: Re: Old Radio Programs
PostPosted: May Sat 18, 2019 8:05 am 
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Andy & Virgnia Manfield in Turn Back the Clock was one of the first narrated recorded music shows on radio.
Andy and Virginia Mansfield had been around radio for most of their lives. Virginia got her start as a dancer and wound up singing with acts like Paul Whiteman and Eddie Albert. She landed a job as a staff singer at WWW, Cincinatti, and eventually moved to Los Angeles to work on KHJ, KFI and KMPC. She worked in vaudeville with her husband Andy, and they were one of the first couples to perform together on television, appearing on the Mutual Don Lee Network in 1937.

The couple is best remembered for NBC's Andy and Virginia and Turn Back The Clock over the Armed Forces Radio and Television Service as noted in the photograph. Turn Back the Clock is thought to be one of the earliest programs to combine recorded music with spoken commentary.

The program featured records, supposedly from the Mansfield's personal collection. Although supposedly a nostalgia act, the show would play just about anything on vinyl, with Virginia introducing the more contemporary tunes and Andy supervising the older hits.

If you like the old hits through the early 1960's with the earlier hits thrown in, this early radio show fits the bill.


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 Post subject: Re: Old Radio Programs
PostPosted: Nov Fri 15, 2019 10:14 pm 
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Location: Georgia, 30236
Thanks for a new bookmark!

_________________
"Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic."
— Arthur C. Clarke


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 Post subject: Re: Old Radio Programs
PostPosted: Nov Fri 22, 2019 1:51 am 
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ZenithStratosphere wrote:
William "Bill" Conrad is listed with having been in over 7,500 Vintage radio shows in both co-starring and starring roles. I doubt any radio actor can match that number. He narrated most of the opening shows of "ESCAPE" and starred or co-starred in many of the episodes, most notably "Linogen and the Ants". Bill Conrad can be heard in many, many other shows from The Adventures of Phillip Marlowe, The Whistler, Suspense, Nightbeat and countless other vintage radio shows.

Of course, Bill Conrad is most famously remembered for his role as the first Marshall Matt Dillon on the original "Gunsmoke" radio show which initially aired on CBS radio April 26, 1952 and ran through 1961. The television version began in 1955 and ran conjunctively with the radio version until 1961 with the scripts for the most part written and all the character development of Marshall Dillon (Bill Conrad), Chester Wesley Proudfoot (Parley Baer), Doc Adams (Howard McNear) and Miss Kitty (Georgia Ellis) created by the brilliant writer John Meston.

In fact, "Gunsmoke" was the last dramatic radio show to be aired from Hollywood in 1961. When the radio version of "Gunsmoke" ended, so did the Golden Age Radio Shows. Many feel "Gunsmoke" to be the best show on the air during the Golden Age of Radio. That is debatable, but "Gunsmoke" certainly made its' mark as did William "Bill" Conrad.


I'd just like give a shout out to Howard McNear, I hear his voice in a lot of other programs besides Gunsmoke.
When Gunsmoke went from Radio to TV, they changed Doc and Kitty. On radio doc is a bit dim witted, and greedy for that next gunfight for his fee. On radio, Kitty was not the girl you take home to mom. On one show Marshall Dillon invited her to a town dance and she initially declined because the society folk would not take kindly to her type of woman at the dance.Marshall talked her into going and it didn't go well, On TV she was the Saloon owner and her reputation was cleaned up.
Gunsmoke is one of my favorites.
Mikek


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 Post subject: Re: Old Radio Programs
PostPosted: Nov Fri 22, 2019 2:45 am 
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John Meston was the creator and major writer with editorial approval over the later other writers for both the Radio and Television shows. The entire cast worked hard to develop the characters that we know today. William Conrad named Chester and also Doc Adams in the radio series and that continued on with the television series. Parley Baer gave himself his middle and last name of Chester Wesley Proudfoot. For the television show, Chester's name was Chester Goode and played by Dennis Weaver. No one seems to know why his last name was changed, but the first name of Chester remained.

There were slight modifications in the characters over the years. Even the names of the Saloons were changed around on the radio and television shows. Howard McNear was portrayed differently than Milburn Stone as Doc Adams later in the television shows but they had their similarities. One of the best of the radio shows with Howard McNear is called "Word of Honor". His real character comes out in that role and in certain other of the episodes such as the one called "Cow Doctor". Parley Baer gave the Eulogy at the Funeral of Howard McNear. He had been on the Andy Griffith Show playing the part of "Floyd the Barber" and passed away from a stroke at the age of 62. He seemed to like the gambling and Saloon life better than his later counterpart Milburn Stone in the radio version, but overall both characters had a great deal of honesty about themselves and always with good ethical qualities. Miss Kitty was played well in both versions by Georgia Ellis on the radio version and Amanda Blake on the television series. Many of the radio shows were re-worked and used in the television series.

The radio show ran from April 26, 1952 until June of 1961 and abruptly taken off the air. Just a simple announcement that "This is the last episode of "Gunsmoke". The television show began in September of 1955 and both were on the air from 1955 until the radio show ceased in 1961, "Gunsmoke" was the last dramatic show to air from CBS studios in Hollywood in 1961. Its' closure marked the end of the Golden Age of Radio.


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 Post subject: Re: Old Radio Programs
PostPosted: Nov Sat 23, 2019 4:20 am 
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The radio show of "Gunsmoke" was evidently always in the 30 minute time slot whereas the television show was always (I think) in the 1 hour time slot.
John Meston remained the main writer with editorial approval over all the other writer's that wrote the "Gunsmoke" stories both for the radio and later television series.
William Conrad directed the first few episodes of the "Gunsmoke" television series and continued on with the radio version until it ended in 1961.
All of the other original radio Actors in "Gunsmoke" went on to successful careers and roles in other shows both on radio and television such as Howard McNear's role on the Andy Griffith Show as"Floyd the Barber".


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