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 Post subject: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Aug Wed 01, 2012 4:27 am 
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Joined: Feb Mon 27, 2012 5:56 am
Posts: 1248
Location: St. Cloud, Minnesota
When I first started out in this hobby in early 1980 everyone was using cassettes or some still Reel to Reel. Back then I bought a bunch of cassettes to get me started then I found out about trading on cassettes and as the years went on my collection grew and so did my
OTR friends. Now as we have moved to cd/dvd/mp3 we can buy a whole collection at one time or down load thousand of shows in short order. What took me years to collect on cassette took no time to get on cd/dvd/mp3. There is no more trading (or very little of it)
and loss of person to person contact! While I couldn't be more happy about all the shows I can get without all the work or expense it seems that the "person" in OTR Collecting has been lost. We are all still here but the hobby has seem to gone almost "Solo" or impersonal.
Where is the sharing or trading, getting to know others in the hobby, the excitement of getting a package in the mail box with new shows to listen to? I guess i miss the most of having someone to share the hobby with, exchange thoughts, like and dislikes and discussing the characters on a special show. Dose anyone else think or feel that the hobby has become impersonal with the advance in modern technology?

I would love to hear what other collector think on this subject!

Lynn

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 Post subject: Re: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Aug Wed 01, 2012 6:00 pm 
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Joined: Jun Sun 12, 2011 1:32 am
Posts: 882
For me and where I live there never was anyplace to trade or talk about them. I use to find old records or tapes of the shows at yard sales,bargain bins,etc. I like that there are so many shows online. One thing you could do is volunteer at a retirement home and see what the people that live there use to like to listen to. Then just make some and bring in there for them to listen. So many of our elderly in this country are real gems and they are neglected. I made a set for my cousin to give her dad who is having cancer treatments. I figured it would be good to get his mind off of things. As far as "talking shop" goes I save that for the radio meets I go to. In the last year I have been to about 4 since last October.


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 Post subject: Re: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Aug Wed 01, 2012 6:06 pm 
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Joined: Mar Fri 16, 2007 6:14 am
Posts: 1014
Location: Central Pa.
Inpersonal nothing! I love to be able to just go and download from archive.org, now that their downloads have gotten faster.

Who wants to drive all over, wait for the mail, all that crap? Good riddance!

Download, put 'em on the MP3, within an hour I'm listening on the SStrans. Done.

Rich


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 Post subject: Re: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Aug Thu 02, 2012 4:42 pm 
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Location: Somers, CT
I think the Internet, and the growth of the better quality vendors, has
reduced the need to trade cassettes and tapes. We can now trade
hundreds of shows on DVD or CD, where in the old analog days this
required much more interaction between collectors. I'll confess that I
have acquired most of my collection in the past decade. After filling
four 400-CD cases I finally realized I'll never live long enough to
hear 1/10th of them :( What worries me is the loss of quality when
some vendors lower the bit rate to maximize their profits by being
able to squeeze more on the media. When that stuff gets traded we
all lose out.

Pete

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 Post subject: Re: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Aug Fri 03, 2012 3:57 am 
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Joined: Feb Mon 27, 2012 5:56 am
Posts: 1248
Location: St. Cloud, Minnesota
I too have alot but since I have been collecting for 30 year I have heard alot of what I have
before on cassette. However, I have started buying stuff I don't think I'd enjoy so I have stuff to trade when someone asks. On the other hand some of this "stuff" I have ended up enjoying anyway! I think one of the reasons the hobby has become inpersonal for me because I don't know anyone else in Minnesota that collects.

Lynn

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Linda
Always looking for GE Bandy Items!


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 Post subject: Re: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Aug Fri 03, 2012 8:22 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: SoCal, 91387
philcolynn wrote:
Where is the sharing or trading, getting to know others in the hobby, the excitement of getting a package in the mail box with new shows to listen to? I guess i miss the most of having someone to share the hobby with, exchange thoughts, like and dislikes and discussing the characters on a special show.

Isn't this what hobby-specific message boards, like ARF, are all about? Just sub "email attachment" for "package in the mail box"...

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 Post subject: Re: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Aug Mon 06, 2012 1:04 am 
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Joined: Apr Mon 04, 2011 4:23 am
Posts: 697
Location: SW PA
There are old time radio show forums out there for people that enjoy them. Google brings up several. I do think it is a good thing that all of these shows are available for download. That way, more people than ever have access to them and can share them. On the other hand, a lot of older folks aren't good with computers so they may not know how to hear them or even know they are out there, so I guess it's a toss up.


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 Post subject: Re: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Aug Wed 08, 2012 2:14 pm 
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Joined: Feb Wed 25, 2009 4:06 pm
Posts: 1454
Location: Morristown, N.J.
I never looked at collecting radio shows as a social thing. I still have a handful of tapes around the house and at one time had some on transcription. These days I no longer have to worry about damaged tapes and worn scratchy records; simple and plentiful downloads are all that I need. On top of that, all of my radio shows are now stored on one small external hard drive and it takes only minutes to download every show of a particular program. I'm certainly glad the good ol' days are over.

Pete AI2V

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 Post subject: Re: Has the hobby become inpersonal?
PostPosted: Oct Sat 06, 2012 6:05 pm 
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Joined: Sep Thu 28, 2006 12:51 pm
Posts: 6961
Location: Sarasota, Florida
Peter Bertini wrote:
I think the Internet, and the growth of the better quality vendors, has
reduced the need to trade cassettes and tapes. We can now trade
hundreds of shows on DVD or CD, where in the old analog days this
required much more interaction between collectors. I'll confess that I
have acquired most of my collection in the past decade. After filling
four 400-CD cases I finally realized I'll never live long enough to
hear 1/10th of them :( What worries me is the loss of quality when
some vendors lower the bit rate to maximize their profits by being
able to squeeze more on the media. When that stuff gets traded we
all lose out.

Pete


It's the loss that really hurts. I get steamed when I hear certain programs -- from various sources they're all the same -- with really inferior audio quality. Sure, ticks and pops can be expected, along with other possible limitations of the 1930's-era recordings, but the stuff I'm referring to are things like tape dropouts, wow & flutter, badly muffled audio with a large amount of background noise and hum, and the worst -- CD skipping. Examples of the "Worst of the worst" are the earlier episodes of Your Hit Parade. Some have record-skipping (uh, couldn't they play it again?) while others have severe CD skipping and terrible audio quality that obviously didn't originate with the transcriptions. If only I could locate the original transcription and copy it again . . . the skips, and many of the ticks, pops, and crackle can be fixed using an audio-editing program like Sound Forge or Audacity. Sometimes a few CD skips can also be fixed, but the ones in the 1930's Hit Parade are just plain awful. Hum, noise, forget it.

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