Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Apr Wed 08, 2020 3:40 am


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Original filters still OK
PostPosted: Jan Thu 20, 2011 2:07 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 557
Location: owings mills, md, usa
Many of you might have seen this, but I'm sure it's rare. I have a 72 year old Emerson on the bench and its dual electrolytic is still doing its job. I keep a wide stock of caps on hand and expect to change them in each of the sets crossing my bench. However, the old saw dictates that if it "ain't broke, don't fix it." What do you think?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 20, 2011 2:43 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Aug Wed 26, 2009 5:38 am
Posts: 3254
Location: Belgrade, MT - Big Sky Country
In this case, I'd fix it. They've done their time. Why risk having to replace them in a few months, or having them short and take out other parts along with them?

_________________
Bryan at Spacekat Designs, Unique Musical Instruments
~Will work for parts~


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 20, 2011 5:38 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jun Thu 17, 2010 5:41 pm
Posts: 1617
Location: Dawson Creek BC, Canada
I've got a RCA R-7 from 1931 that the factory filters still work on.That makes them 80 years old!I am going to replace them when i recapp the set though.I don't need them taking out my power transformer.

Nick

_________________
Nick
Life without music would be a mistake-Nietzsche
I am not accountable for any damage this causes


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 20, 2011 6:04 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Thu 15, 2006 1:21 am
Posts: 4683
Location: NE Ohio
For the price on lytics today it is not worth the time and hassle of opening the same set again. Replace!

_________________
Bruce


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 21, 2011 1:40 am 
Member

Joined: Nov Wed 07, 2007 12:44 am
Posts: 1904
Location: Hawthorne, Ca
Replace the electrolytic caps as it's cheap insurance against destroying something like a power transformer. Harry


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 21, 2011 3:52 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 9730
Location: Beaver Falls, PA. USA
I have occasionally seen "FP" type capacitors from the 1940s or 1950s that were still good. That said, one thing to remember is that most old radios did not have any fuses, so a capacitor failure could be expensive.

The Philco 45C that I'm currently working on did have one wet electrolytic that still had liquid, and measured 8 microfarads, although it had a high power factor. Of course, it's getting restuffed.

_________________
Tim KA3JRT


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 21, 2011 4:14 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Fri 14, 2008 1:40 pm
Posts: 8798
Location: SE USA
Tim Tress wrote:

The Philco 45C that I'm currently working on did have one wet electrolytic that still had liquid, and measured 8 microfarads, although it had a high power factor. Of course, it's getting restuffed.


Smart move, Tim. I once thought I had a good one because it was still sealed and you could hear the liquid inside. When I opened it there was no more than a teaspoonfull of electrolyte and the rest was a giant clog of borax and green corrosion.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 21, 2011 4:31 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Mon 27, 2010 3:30 am
Posts: 316
Location: Calhoun, TN
Since my RCA Livingston is setting on the bench awaiting transformer transplant surgery due to the fact that the PS caps blew without a bit of hum. I'd say you should learn from my poor decision making as that is my favorite radio.

_________________
Smokestuffer


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 21, 2011 4:59 am 
Moderator

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 28462
Location: Detroit, MI USA
I would definitely replace them if it were mine. I would have most likely done so before applying power for the first time and without wasting time testing them.

Just too risky as others have already pointed out.

_________________
Dennis

Experience is what you gain when the results aren't what you were expecting.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 21, 2011 2:20 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 557
Location: owings mills, md, usa
Don't worry, you're preaching to the choir. They will be changed. Just thought it was unique that a part like that could survive the eons.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Fri 21, 2011 4:34 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Sun 06, 2008 3:28 am
Posts: 4492
Location: Richmond, VA
I just pulled the chassis on a working Zenith 6G601 I just bought on eBay. I was sure it had been recapped, at least the lytics, as the power cord isn't original.

I was surprised to find that the chassis looks untouched other than the ac cord. Those caps would be 68 years old.

_________________
Ed


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Thu 27, 2011 10:42 pm 
New Member

Joined: Jan Mon 17, 2011 5:43 am
Posts: 5
Hi, new member here . . . My interest is mainly vintage tube stereo amps.

How useful is an ESR meter in predicting the continued reliability of a vintage lytic?

Before I bought the meter I routinely replaced all the old caps. Now I always test the existing cans. I then compare the readings with those of a new cap which I would use as a replacement. Usually, there is very little difference and, on occasion, the old cap actually has lower ESR than the prospective new replacement.

When the difference between the old and new caps is negligible I leave the old one in place. Is this a reasonable practice to follow? Is ESR actually an indication of the health of a cap?

Thanks . . . Charlie


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 12 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  


































-->


Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB