Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Apr Wed 08, 2020 2:06 am


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 15 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: First ST Tube Production Date?
PostPosted: Jan Mon 24, 2011 4:44 pm 
Member

Joined: Dec Thu 31, 2009 4:28 pm
Posts: 4790
Location: Under the Blue skys of OR 97524
When were the first ST shape tubes produced and when did they start showing up equipped in production radios?


I have not been able to find an answer to this, though it seems to be a simple question.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Mon 24, 2011 5:40 pm 
Member

Joined: Oct Sat 20, 2007 3:36 am
Posts: 14393
Location: Southern NH, 03076
Id say 1931-32


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Mon 24, 2011 9:47 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Apr Thu 20, 2006 5:36 pm
Posts: 1527
Location: Holland, MI
I don't know about 1931, but by sometime in 1932 definitely.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Mon 24, 2011 10:15 pm 
Member

Joined: Dec Thu 31, 2009 4:28 pm
Posts: 4790
Location: Under the Blue skys of OR 97524
Anybody know any history on who started ST tube production. It was a good idea so it must have been adopted by the industry quickly. Were there any hold outs or were all globe tubes out of production by 1933?

Thanks for replies


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Mon 24, 2011 10:21 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Fri 20, 2008 3:41 pm
Posts: 684
Location: Pueblo West Colorado
Hi,
I have always wondered what drove all the different styles. In the early twenties there were 199s and WE peanut tubes. It was not necessary to have huge packages for most triodes. Power tubes must have driven the need for large enclosures? Was/Is the ST glass better in any respect other than size?
Eric

_________________
"In the valley of the blind...a one eyed man is king..." -Erasmus


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Mon 24, 2011 10:35 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jun Thu 17, 2010 5:41 pm
Posts: 1617
Location: Dawson Creek BC, Canada
I have always wondered why they went from globes to the ST shape as well.The only thing that i have been able to think of is that it was for marketing.

I can however see the value in making the GT tubes.I have a few radios the you could not physically fit a ST tube into.

Nick

_________________
Nick
Life without music would be a mistake-Nietzsche
I am not accountable for any damage this causes


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Mon 24, 2011 10:56 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 693
Location: Stafford, Texas USA
The cost


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Mon 24, 2011 11:47 pm 
Member

Joined: Jul Sun 09, 2006 3:11 am
Posts: 6706
Location: Aurora, CO 80013
Size and cost. Most ST are smaller than their S brothers. Think about the cost savings in aluminum pop cans when you make the top smaller. Spread over millions, it's a lot.
Also, ST allows the use of mica supports at the top that are smaller and better supported. Extremely useful for large plate structures and to curb microphonics. Of course, true "tubular" is best.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 25, 2011 12:25 am 
Moderator

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 37779
Location: Livermore, CA
Has anyone seen a 00A tube in ST? I believe thies tube was only made as a globe until the end...

_________________
Norm


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 25, 2011 2:59 am 
Member

Joined: Dec Thu 31, 2009 4:28 pm
Posts: 4790
Location: Under the Blue skys of OR 97524
I don't know how to prove it, but, I would bet that the ST shape is also stronger than a globe of the same thickness.

Russ


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 25, 2011 3:18 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 30698
Location: Pocasset, Cape Cod, MA
It was explained in magazine articles at the time. I think the mica top support was the most decisive reason. There's no way to support the element structure in an S bulb.

Quote:
Has anyone seen a 00A tube in ST?

I believe they just used old stock until they ran out. Even in the late 20s they stopped production for a year or so because no one was buying the things. The exact dates are in the 1929 GE tube history.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 25, 2011 5:23 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1360
Location: Orlando, FL, USA
The types 57 and 58 were the first tubes to be introduced by all of the major makers in ST-bulbs. This was in mid-1932. To be sure, some makers made at least a few smaller receiving types as globes into 1933. Some larger types like the 10 and 50 were sold new as globes into the late 1930s.

Sylvania, Raytheon, and National Union seem to have introduced some types as globes after RCA stopped making them. I have S-bulbed types 15, 41, 42, 43, 77 (marked as a developmental), 79, 85, and 89 by Sylvania; 49, 52, 83, 85, and 89 by Raytheon; 49 and 84 by National Union. Sylvania's 1932 data manual shows the type 19 as having a S-12 bulb, but I have never seen one.

I think, ultimately, the transition to ST-bulbs was driven by two costs. First, the smaller bulbs are cheaper. Second, since the tubes were supported from the top as well as at the press, there was much less shrinkage loss in shipping.

Other factors would be the need for more rugged tubes for military and industrial applications, and the fact that the ST-bulb glass formula (which is different (in general) from the S-bulb formula, allows for smaller, higher power, types.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 25, 2011 4:36 pm 
Member

Joined: Dec Thu 31, 2009 4:28 pm
Posts: 4790
Location: Under the Blue skys of OR 97524
So, it would seem that all radios built up till 1931 should have globe tubes. Those built in 1932 - 1933 might have a mix. Then all STs, with a very few exceptions until the octals came out in the late 30s. Is this abuot right?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 25, 2011 5:04 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Apr Thu 20, 2006 5:36 pm
Posts: 1527
Location: Holland, MI
There are some very early and/or obscure exceptions, but that's probably generally correct--but only until 1935 when metal tubes were released. Immediately some ST tubes were rebased and the "G"suffix was born.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jan Tue 25, 2011 5:04 pm 
Member

Joined: Oct Sat 20, 2007 3:36 am
Posts: 14393
Location: Southern NH, 03076
I have 42 globes and that tube was introduced in 9/32 so it would have been in at least a few 1933 models.

Im also reasonably sure that the low volume assemblers were using up available globe stock as it was likely cheaper. I have some obscure radio in storage that I forget the details but it was 1934 built and has all globes.

Carl


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 15 posts ] 

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  


































-->


Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB