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 Post subject: Can you identify this capacitor value?
PostPosted: Feb Tue 12, 2019 7:00 pm 
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Joined: Aug Tue 24, 2010 8:56 pm
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Location: Northeast Florida
I've read countless explanations online as to how to read these, but math isn't my thing---I don't know how to convert pf to uf, where I'm supposed to put the decimal point, etc. This one is pretty large, so I'm guessing it's paper? Thanks for any help you can give

EDIT; the lettering is right side up (not upside down) if that helps


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William
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 Post subject: Re: Can you identify this capacitor value?
PostPosted: Feb Tue 12, 2019 10:33 pm 
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Joined: May Sat 06, 2006 4:03 am
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Location: ZIP 23831 South of Richmond, VA 25 miles down the pike.
What does schematic say? What is model number? Here is handy to have in favorites.

https://www.justradios.com/uFnFpF.html

Bill J.


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 Post subject: Re: Can you identify this capacitor value?
PostPosted: Feb Tue 12, 2019 11:15 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Montvale NJ, 07645
100 x 100 pF = 10,000 pF = .01uF @300v.

Once you have pF, just move the decimal point to the left 6 places for uF.


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 Post subject: Re: Can you identify this capacitor value?
PostPosted: Feb Wed 13, 2019 5:26 am 
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Joined: Aug Tue 24, 2010 8:56 pm
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Location: Northeast Florida
Scott wrote:
100 x 100 pF = 10,000 pF = .01uF @300v.

Once you have pF, just move the decimal point to the left 6 places for uF.



Thanks, much appreciated! The radio is a Concord 1-402, and I have the schematic for it. But they must've made running changes in production, because some of the parts values and a couple of connections are different. In this case, the part on the schematic is .05, but based on the color codes, I knew that couldn't be right

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 Post subject: Re: Can you identify this capacitor value?
PostPosted: Feb Wed 13, 2019 8:05 pm 
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Joined: May Sat 06, 2006 4:03 am
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Location: ZIP 23831 South of Richmond, VA 25 miles down the pike.
Well...if you say so. But .01 or .05 the 300V replacement is not 400V according to what the parts list indicates. The cap is not original to set.

Bill J.


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 Post subject: Re: Can you identify this capacitor value?
PostPosted: Feb Wed 13, 2019 9:21 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Montvale NJ, 07645
Assuming this is an RMA/EIA code, the orange dot indicates 300v. 400v would be yellow, and it certainly doesn't look like yellow to me.
I trust what I see in sets more than schematics, especially when I can see that a component looks original to a set.
I would see what kind of voltage is across the cap as a 300v cap there might be perfectly acceptable and put in by the factory.


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 Post subject: Re: Can you identify this capacitor value?
PostPosted: Feb Wed 13, 2019 10:27 pm 
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Location: Tucson, Arizona U.S.A.
Quote:
The cap is not original to set.

You can also tell by the soldering job that it's a replacement part. I would go by the schematic.

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