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 Post subject: Re: Pet Peeve: Repair Threads That Die With No Conclusion
PostPosted: Oct Fri 16, 2020 11:50 pm 
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Problem is they can't repair it, thus no Conclusion. I would guess a third here do not have the skills.

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 Post subject: Re: Pet Peeve: Repair Threads That Die With No Conclusion
PostPosted: Oct Fri 16, 2020 11:53 pm 
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Chris108 wrote:
As somebody who occasionally writes long explanations (though hopefully not filled with needless jargon, wild guesses, or colloquialisms), there's no getting around the fact that certain things in radio and electronics are quite complicated. They cannot be explained in one or two short sentences. I think a long explanation that makes sense is better than a short answer which is unintelligible or overly general, or no answer at all.


There is a difference between a long answer which is on-topic, as short as it can be made while still getting the point across, yet long enough to be complete ....

and

... long rambling monologues filled with unnecessary verbiage and technological mumbo-jumbo or colloquial synonyms that require explanation before they make sense.


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 Post subject: Re: Pet Peeve: Repair Threads That Die With No Conclusion
PostPosted: Oct Sat 17, 2020 7:20 pm 
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John Bartley wrote:
Chris108 wrote:
As somebody who occasionally writes long explanations (though hopefully not filled with needless jargon, wild guesses, or colloquialisms), there's no getting around the fact that certain things in radio and electronics are quite complicated. They cannot be explained in one or two short sentences. I think a long explanation that makes sense is better than a short answer which is unintelligible or overly general, or no answer at all.


There is a difference between a long answer which is on-topic, as short as it can be made while still getting the point across, yet long enough to be complete ....

and

... long rambling monologues filled with unnecessary verbiage and technological mumbo-jumbo or colloquial synonyms that require explanation before they make sense.

So---let's play this out.....

You post a question, and a graybeard starts talking. Pretty soon, the graybeard says one or more strange words---eg "Ohm's Law", "voltmeter"," signal generator",etc. Before you totally go under, you need to raise your hand and ask for explanation of any fundamental concepts. Otherwise,GB will drone on, assuming that you understood everything.....very quickly, you can be hopelessly lost.

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 Post subject: Re: Pet Peeve: Repair Threads That Die With No Conclusion
PostPosted: Oct Sat 17, 2020 11:43 pm 
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AJJ wrote: "Neither do I. I briefly owned a scope and VTVM but discovered they're optional equipment for the way I work. More gear does not automatically translate into better ability. Not always, but there's usually a workaround when a piece of gear is not available."



'Optional equipment'? "......usually a work around"? Well there are many situations where an oscilloscope, for instance, would be a very handy instrument to use. Actually, I used my Fluke 97 oscilloscope some years ago for an FM alignment of an antique radio of mine. You see, I purchased that radio from an antique dealer whose former owner fiddled around with the FM tuning adjustments.

On another occasion, I had to use a Heathkit oscilloscope to calibrate my Hitachi VT-50 VCR after I changed the video head on it some years ago.

On still another instance, my Fluke 97 oscilloscope was used to check several sensors on my father's 1995 Oldsmobile 88 Royale as a code reader was simply not available for that particular car.

A couple of years ago, in fact, I used the Fluke 97 oscilloscope when repairing my 1990 Magnavox 27" color TV console a couple of years ago. Actually, I also used my Heathkit HV probe as well.

Then there was the time when I used my Fluke 97 oscilloscope to troubleshoot a pocket transistor radio which I had purchased on eBay.

You know, I lost count on how many situations in which I used the Fluke 97 oscilloscope with an accompanying curve tracer in checking out various semiconductors, and I actually checked out several IC chips as well with the two.

Here and now: In about a week or so, I will likely be dropping the rear bumper from my 2005 Jaguar XJ8L in my parents' garage so as to check the four parking assist sensors. It's unclear at this point whether the oscilloscope and curve tracer would actually be helpful in this particular situation, but I will certainly try them out regardless. Actually, I will bring along my Conar 211 VTVM as well as my Sears DVM too. Between the three, I (hopefully) will be able to ferret out the defective sensor(s).

In short, I have used oscilloscopes, signal tracers, capacitance checkers, VTVM's, DVM's, tube testers, curve tracers and HV probes for several decades as they have all been vital in diagnosing and repairing a host of electronic circuits and components.


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 Post subject: Re: Pet Peeve: Repair Threads That Die With No Conclusion
PostPosted: Oct Sun 18, 2020 4:11 am 
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Blustar1 wrote:

In short, I have used oscilloscopes, signal tracers, capacitance checkers, VTVM's, DVM's, tube testers, curve tracers and HV probes for several decades as they have all been vital in diagnosing and repairing a host of electronic circuits and components.

What, no signal generator? :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Pet Peeve: Repair Threads That Die With No Conclusion
PostPosted: Oct Tue 20, 2020 7:48 pm 
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Another aggravating thing is when the poster ignores the advice offered, because he or she already thinks that it is incorrect, or doesn't like it.

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 Post subject: Re: Pet Peeve: Repair Threads That Die With No Conclusion
PostPosted: Oct Tue 20, 2020 10:49 pm 
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Joined: Aug Wed 24, 2011 4:35 am
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Location: Sunnyvale CA
Tim Tress wrote:
Another aggravating thing is when the poster ignores the advice offered, because he or she already thinks that it is incorrect, or doesn't like it.


*Many* people on these sorts of hobby message boards are convinced they already know what to do, and post assertions in the form of questions, then get irate when someone doesn't buy their premise. That is not remotely unique to ARF, it happens far worse and far more often on other forums I inhabit.

Brett


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