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 Post subject: Raytheon m1601 Blowing Fuses
PostPosted: Oct Wed 28, 2020 12:47 pm 
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Joined: Oct Wed 28, 2020 12:45 pm
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Hi,

I have recapped a Raytheon M1601 but when I power it up, the fuse blows in the high voltage cage. Someone in the past attempted to repair this set and did a terrible job. Can spmeone show or tell me exactly what is physically attached to the bottoms of each 1X2 tube? routerlogin


Last edited by JaclynJohns on Nov Sat 14, 2020 12:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Raytheon m1601 Blowing Fuses
PostPosted: Oct Wed 28, 2020 3:59 pm 
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Joined: May Thu 14, 2015 4:15 pm
Posts: 2642
Location: Dallas, TX
That seems to be an uncommon set. I think you are going to have to give us some more information.
How about a picture of the area?
I found that is a set from about 1950.
1X2 tubes are high voltage rectifiers. If there is more than one then they probably are in a "voltage doubler" circuit. Do be very careful around that area. There probably is some high voltage stored on some of the parts.
It probably wouldn't kill you but it could make you land on the floor.
If the fuse blows it probably means there is a problem in the horizontal output tube circuit. The horizontal output also creates the high voltage.
The base of the 1X2 would be connected to the second anode of the picture tube (CRT) which is a connection on the "funnel" portion. If there is a second 1X2 it would be connected to a high voltage capacitor. and then to the other 1X2. Some TV have a metal ring mounted at a small distance from the tube base, this guards against corona discharge.

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 Post subject: Re: Raytheon m1601 Blowing Fuses
PostPosted: Oct Wed 28, 2020 5:49 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2212
Location: Lafayette, CO
I would (and have) suggested this be taken to somebody who repairs vintage sets. This person will just take up your time. Craig


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 Post subject: Re: Raytheon m1601 Blowing Fuses
PostPosted: Oct Sat 31, 2020 11:16 am 
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Joined: Jun Tue 16, 2020 11:07 am
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I don't even have a radar so not really my field ..... but is the fuse in the power supply, the electonic circuitry or the rotating mechanism supply. I can't comment on the electronics but if it's in the power supply/motor drive it could be some kind of restriction to the drive like stiff or failing bearings which is causing the motor to intermittently draw too much current and overload the supply side.

If there an easy way to test the bearings for stiffness or play by hand?

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 Post subject: Re: Raytheon m1601 Blowing Fuses
PostPosted: Oct Sat 31, 2020 12:38 pm 
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Joined: May Sun 07, 2017 11:35 am
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Location: Belrose, NSW, Australia
A bit of leg pulling may be happening here I guess. Raytheon do (or did) make radars though!

I think we are talking about one of these:

http://antiquetvguy.com/WebPages/TheSet ... oPage.html

It DOES have a round screen!

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 Post subject: Re: Raytheon m1601 Blowing Fuses
PostPosted: Oct Sat 31, 2020 2:58 pm 
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Joined: May Thu 14, 2015 4:15 pm
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Location: Dallas, TX
I found some service info on a similar chassis (smaller screen), but not this one.
No pictures of the area that was asked about.

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Tim
It's not the Destination, It's the Journey.


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 Post subject: Re: Raytheon m1601 Blowing Fuses
PostPosted: Nov Sun 01, 2020 10:46 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 9610
Location: Beaver Falls, PA. USA
A blown high voltage fuse could be caused by several other things, such as a defective flyback, yoke, or a problem with the horizontal output stage. At this point, I would check for shorts in those circuits, since the fuse is blowing immediately.

If the fuse blows after a short delay, check to see if the horizontal output tube is red plating.

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