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 Post subject: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sat 15, 2019 8:37 pm 
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Joined: Feb Fri 27, 2015 3:19 pm
Posts: 54
I am using the original wall wart for a Sony ICF 2010 rated at 120VAC/4.5VDC. Since I have 220V in my place, I connect it to a 220/120 step down which effectively provides 115VAC. The wall wart gives out 5.15VDC when no load is applied. The radio is continuously connected to the ac using this set up.
The other day the wall wart felt hot to the touch and I also noticed a heat mark on it which I think has been there since I got it 11 years ago but I am not sure - see the two photos. I unplugged it overnight, today I connected it and an hour later the temperature on its front surface was 37C/98F. Three hours later it was 41C/106F. In both instances the temperature on the back side where the two prongs are was about 4C/7F lower and the radio had been off all along. Judging from how it felt yesterday, I guess that leaving it connected for long time it would reach 45C/112F. Another wall wart for a different radio connected to the ac through the same step down is cool, so are three more wall warts connected to the ac through different step downs, they all show 31-32C/88-90F
Is the measured temperature too high to be of concern?
If I connect the wall wart to the ac but leaving it off the radio and I measure a lower temperature, would that mean that the radio draws too much current thus being the cause of overheating the wall wart?


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sat 15, 2019 8:46 pm 
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Joined: Feb Wed 07, 2018 6:52 pm
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Location: Stone Mountain, GA
Why does it have a 120V plug if it is 220V?

Looks like a switching type that would likely be 90-240V in.

Should not get very warm.

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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sat 15, 2019 9:19 pm 
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Location: Mountains of Mourne. Ireland.
Sony manufactured 4.5V power adapters (in both polarity configurations) for every continent. Lol
If you want some old-school - noise free adapter model numbers, we need to figure out where you are.

:) Greg.


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sat 15, 2019 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Feb Fri 27, 2015 3:19 pm
Posts: 54
To Scott: it has a 120 plug because it was made for and bought in the USA, that is why I mentioned I use a 220/120 step down as I now have 220V which takes me to
Gregg: I live in Greece with 220V line voltage but do I really need a new wall wart and if I do, I prefer to get an original one. I also know that Sony made two different ones for the USA market and from what I remember the difference in output caused some confusion and concern to the owners.


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sat 15, 2019 9:53 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 23853
Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
The wall-wart was meant for 120v @ 60Hz

If you are using a step-down transformer from 220v to 115vAC .... you probably also have only 50Hz.

The wall-wart's internal transformer is less efficient at 50Hz

"Can a 50hz transformer run on 60hz?
The lower the operating frequency the more flux lines that are generated. Operating a transformer at 50Hz generates 20% more flux lines than at 60Hz. ... Therefore, a transformer designed to run at 50Hz will simply run cooler at 60Hz. But one designed only for 60Hz may overheat if subjected to 50Hz."

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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sat 15, 2019 9:58 pm 
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Location: Mountains of Mourne. Ireland.
SONY AC-E455F ebay images...

Image
https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/XusAAOSw ... -l1600.jpg

Image
https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/lScAAOSw ... -l1600.jpg

More (SONY Walkman AC adapter/s) information...
viewtopic.php?p=2885058#p2885058
scroll up on the... Lots of noise-free SONY Walkman AC adapters from yesteryear on ebay... link!

Greg.
observe polarity (jack) configuration.


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sun 16, 2019 7:53 am 
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Joined: Feb Fri 27, 2015 3:19 pm
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To Peter Balazsy,
Indeed it is a 60Hz transformer and the step down is a 50Hz. So, it is due to internal design that my other transistor's 60Hz transformer does not overheat although it runs off the same 50Hz step down.
Assuming that the partial melting of the case is due to internal overheating instead of exposure to some external heat source, isn't it strange that no internal damage has happened?


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sun 16, 2019 8:21 am 
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Location: Haledon, NJ, usa
radioer wrote:
To Peter Balazsy,
Indeed it is a 60Hz transformer and the step down is a 50Hz. So, it is due to internal design that my other transistor's 60Hz transformer does not overheat although it runs off the same 50Hz step down.
Assuming that the partial melting of the case is due to internal overheating instead of exposure to some external heat source, isn't it strange that no internal damage has happened?

Any marginally designed 60Hz transformer would show effects of overheating if run at lower frequencies like 50Hz.
Well designed and over designs may tolerate the 50Hz better.
There are lots of things to consider in transformer design... not the least of which is the quality and type of metal used in the laminations.

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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Sun 16, 2019 8:06 pm 
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Location: SoCal, 91387
Wouldn't be a bad idea to try letting it power up for awhile D/C from the radio, to see if it heats up anyways or not. I too have an ICF-2010, but just operate it on batteries, which seem to last quite a long time.

I took out my Sony power adapter and measured it, no load, to be putting out 5.42 volts.


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Wed 19, 2019 4:15 pm 
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Joined: Feb Fri 27, 2015 3:19 pm
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To fifties,
I am not sure if I understand your advice, can you explain please.


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Wed 19, 2019 4:19 pm 
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Location: Mountains of Mourne. Ireland.
D/C disconnected.

Greg.


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Thu 20, 2019 6:40 pm 
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Joined: Oct Mon 02, 2017 8:53 am
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Location: Panama City, FL 32401
radioer wrote:
To fifties,
I am not sure if I understand your advice, can you explain please.


What Fifties meant was plug in your wal-wart,and let it run without being connected to the radio. See if it gets hot,and measure the voltage output from the wal-wart. Voltage should be more without a load connected to it.


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Thu 20, 2019 11:08 pm 
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Joined: Feb Fri 27, 2015 3:19 pm
Posts: 54
I did that for three hours and it went to around 100F instead of 105-107 when connected for four hours.
Anyway, thanks to everybody for the input and help.


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 Post subject: Re: Wall wart temperature
PostPosted: Jun Fri 21, 2019 12:54 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: SoCal, 91387
The Wall Wart is toast. A normal one wouldn't get beyond mildly warm with no load, and even with one, shouldn't become hot. Doing this seems to have proved that the radio isn't the culprit, drawing too much current.

I would suggest, while waiting to obtain another one, to operate the set on batteries, and see how long they last. If the set is truly soaking current, they won't last long.

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