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 Post subject: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Jan Sun 11, 2015 7:59 am 
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Hello all, I am new to the forums so please bear with me. As a Firefighter, My hobby is collecting and displaying vintage/older public safety radios and dispatch consoles. I have just started getting in to old tube equipment and I recently aquired an old 40's/50's Link Radio Corp Type 2365-ED 2a transmitter-receiver console.From my online research the unit appears fairly rare and I can't find any manuals or documents anywhere. I would appreciate any info that anyone may have on this unit. I am going to try to attach some photos.Thanks


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Jan Sun 11, 2015 4:18 pm 
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Location: 08033 Cherry Hill Jersey
Welcome,

Your interest in Public Safety equipment is....interesting!

Poke around here and you'll find plenty of resources to perhaps track down a schematic or manual. Keep Googling, there are several other sites that have vintage manuals, ebaman.com for instance has free schematics.

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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Jan Sun 11, 2015 6:22 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Maryland 20709, USA
Hi Robert, and welcome aboard.

Link was one of several two-way radio manufacturers, in a group far behind Motorola, GE, and RCA in terms of market share. I don't know what their niche market was, or even whether they had a niche or not.

The set is rare the same as all Link radios are rare, because they didn't sell many.

I encountered a few of them over the years, mostly back in the 60s and 70s.
I don't recall any performance problems with those few sets.

Documentation may be scarce.

- Leigh

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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Jan Sun 11, 2015 9:10 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3636
Location: Monterey California USA
I presume that is the one that just closed on eBay? Your photos did not expand for me.

I collect old two-way radios and have assorted topics about them on my website.

Fred Link was one of the first manufacturers of a police radio. He acquired the American Bosch Corporation's police radio line in approximately 1934 and began selling almost the same thing except with a Link nameplate on them. His plant was located in New York city in a muli-story building shared wth Bill Lear of Lear Jet fame. His company was originally one of the main suppliers of police radios, competing with Western Electric and a bunch of small mom and pop outfits. By the late 1930's GE, Motorola and RCA had entered the market and competition was fierce.

Link won the contract to build the new 2-way VHF FM system for the Connecticut State Police in 1940, which is often referred to as the first FM system ever built, although it was actually the second. Link got many contracts during WW2 and apparently prospered, but by 1951 (more or less) he had lost control of the company and it went broke. The assets were purchased by several interests and the Link name continued into the early 1960's, moving around the country, ending up just a label on items actually manufactured by third parties.

Your base station should date from around 1950-53. It consists of a mobile radio with an AC power supply on it, put inside a desktop cabinet. There is also a remote control interface chassis next to the radio section. When Link was looking for a job after the collapse of Link Radio, he was hired by Allen B. DuMont to create a mobile radio division, and the DuMont mobile radios were almost an exact copy of the old Link equipment. There was a DuMont tabletop base that looked practically identical to yours.

I think one of the reasons that Link didn't make it is that his equipment did not keep up with technology. It was rather crude and basic, although reliable. For example, by 1951 Motorola was making complex mobile radios with miniature tubes, vibrator power supplies and superb performance, while Link was still selling 1942 designs with Loktal tubes, separate receivers and transmitters, dynamotors and giant bakelite crystal holders that could not hold to modern tolerance standards, and more. Almost all Link equipment should have been taken out of service by 1963 when the new narrowbanding rules came into effect. That's one reason it's rare today.

Unfortunately I don't have a manual for your unit. Documentation is very hard to get, which is one reason I haven't done a Link Radio history web page yet. Fred Link refused to discuss the history of his company in any detail so a great deal of information died with him.

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WB6NVH
California Highway Patrol Radio
Bell System Mobile Telephone History
http://www.wb6nvh.com


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Jan Mon 12, 2015 12:35 am 
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Joined: Jan Sun 11, 2015 7:45 am
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I want to thank everyone for the warm welcome and information. Geoff,Yes this is the one that just closed on Ebay. Another question, Does anyone know of a good,reliable shop that can restore this for me? Everything in my collection works as it should,even if I can't use it due to narrow banding,and I want this unit to work as well.


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Jan Mon 12, 2015 9:26 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3636
Location: Monterey California USA
Well...restored in what way? Cosmetically or electrically?

What did you want it to do? Fire departments have migrated to digital systems, trunked UHF or narrowband and this isn't going to function on those. Depends on where you are as to whether this would do anything at all useful anymore.

There really isn't any collector following of old two-way gear and certainly no mainstream interest. I have never heard of anyone offering restoration of such gear, much less a shop doing so. There is no demand for such services.

At least that's my opinion. Others may have suggestions.

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California Highway Patrol Radio
Bell System Mobile Telephone History
http://www.wb6nvh.com


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Jan Tue 13, 2015 1:42 am 
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Joined: Jan Sun 11, 2015 7:45 am
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Geoff,Thank you for your reply and opinion. I fully understand that I can't use this console for what it was designed for. I work full time as a telecommunicator in public safety at our local hospital and part time for the local E-Comm center. I have been involveed in the public safety communications field for over 20 years so I fully understand current FCC rules and regulations. As I stated in my last post,Everthing in my collection works the way it is supposed to even if it can't be used for its original purpose. I want the unit restored to working condition and to look good.


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Mar Wed 11, 2015 7:35 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 155
Location: Ashland, OR, USA
This thread peaked my interest for many years ago, I hauled home a Link 1097 2ed VHF? base station with the idea of eventually restoring it. I am to the point where I probably never do anything with it and even toyed with the thought of stripping it for parts. Also some time ago, I picked up a remote head for a Link mobile transceiver and over the years I have kept my eyes open for a mobile unit to go with it. Because of that, I am aware that Link equipment is not common. Seeing the discussion here brings to light the historic value of Link equipment so I am now less inclined to dismantle it. I guess that it is best to appreciate and preserve the unit so that someday someone else will be able to enjoy a complete rig instead of having a pile of parts.

I agree with Geoff that Link used old technology for the majority of tubes in my set are loctal. I find it interesting that they used a pair of 816 half wave rectifiers in the power supply. One thing I can say for it is that it appears to have been well laid out and well made and I like the art-deco style cabinet. An item of interest is that someone pasted a tube layout chart using miniature tubes over the original tube layout chart on the inside cabinet door. The miniature tube layout chart is of no use since the receiver chassis is all loctal. Possibly the receiver chassis was exchanged with a miniature tube type receiver chassis when a repair was needed and over time, loctal and miniature tube receiver chassis were interchanged with a loctal chassis finally ending up in the unit at the time it was taken out of service. I say this because I have a juke box and it was common practice to exchange the amplifier that to repair it on site. There were two styles of amplifiers that were totally interchangeable, a newer style one with a pair of 6L6's and an older style one using four 6V6's. It was pot luck on whichever the serviceman had on his truck at the time. Unfortunately for me, my Juke box ended up with the older style amplifier. This could have been the same situation with Link repairs.

I sort of recall that I had a manual for the 1907 2ed unit but have no idea where it would be. If I find it, I will post that I have it for reference. I pulled it out of storage a took a few quickie pictures for you to enjoy. If anyone has some information on this Link unit, I would sure appreciate knowing about it.

Thanks for the discussion and have a great day,
Bob Deuel, K2GLO


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Bob, K2GLO
Ashland, OR 97520
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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Mar Thu 12, 2015 2:35 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3636
Location: Monterey California USA
Bob, your base station should be a VHF high band version of the 50UFS low band base. There is a manual for the 50UFS here that would at least give you a power supply schematic and some harness wiring diagrams:

http://www.bunkerofdoom.com/kd5oei/link/linkmenu/Linkmenu.html

Your posting says 1097 but I believe you mean 1907. Based on the blue color front plate and the style of the Link logo, your station is a postwar production unit probably dating from 1946-1951. 1946 was the year that the FCC issued a ruling allowing land mobile systems to establish stations on 150-152 MHz with permanent licenses. Before that there was no equipment being manufactured other than for experimental use.

1907 manuals should be out there somewhere, such as occasionally on eBay. But this is a wideband radio that needs some modification to run on modern ham frequencies, and I am not sure if it even has a deviation control. The cost of crystals these days exceeds the cost of a Baofeng import dual-band HT, so it's hard to justify buying them for one channel.

These stations were some of the most iconic of Link products, used all over the world.

_________________
WB6NVH
California Highway Patrol Radio
Bell System Mobile Telephone History
http://www.wb6nvh.com


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Mar Fri 13, 2015 7:46 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 155
Location: Ashland, OR, USA
Oops...... Geoff you are so right. I transposed the model number and I did not catch the mistake in the dim midnight oil light.

Earlier, when I was researching the Link transceiver on the internet, I came across "Bunker of Doom's" manual for the 50UFS low band unit. It did not occur to me that possibly the power supply and the connecting cable pin-outs may be the same between the high and low band units.. Good call! I will check it out.

Thanks for the other background information on the Links. Every little bit of data is another piece of the puzzle solved.

Bob, K2GLO

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Ashland, OR 97520


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Mar Fri 13, 2015 12:31 pm 
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Joined: Jul Tue 31, 2012 9:37 pm
Posts: 158
Location: Delta, Oh - 43515
I just received the March 2015 issue of Electric Radio magazine,
and it has a nice article on the US military's use of FM,
with quite a bit of information on Link, including how they got started, etc.


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Mar Mon 16, 2015 12:56 am 
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Joined: Mar Thu 05, 2015 2:31 am
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I worked on a few Link radios back when I worked in a 2 way shop (70s). I remember them as very heavy radios...true boatanchors.

Read the article in ER. Good one.

BTW I met Fred Link in the early nineties...I think he was in his early nineties actually. He was honored at an RCA event at the national 2 way show. I made a point to go over and shake his hand at the end of it.

Peter


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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Mar Mon 16, 2015 2:53 am 
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Location: Radio Heaven, North Carolina, near Charlotte, 28106-3015
My suggestion for you if you want them to work and maybe
use them would be to get your ham license then convert them
to use on 2 meters, shouldn't be too big a deal to convert and wouldn't
make any drastic changes to them.
It'd be cool to have the operate on 2 meters I think.


LLAP

.

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 Post subject: Re: 1940's/50's Link Radio transceiver
PostPosted: Jun Mon 17, 2019 9:14 pm 
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Joined: Sep Sun 16, 2018 10:35 pm
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I know that this is an old post but did you ever find a manual for the Link 2365-Ed 2a?
I found one in my old files!


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