Forums :: Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Aug Tue 11, 2020 5:42 pm


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: Jun Fri 15, 2007 10:54 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 7377
Location: Baltimore, MD
Just wondering if anyone here has tried reproducing their own dial glass and how it turned out. Recently I was given a Canadian Westinghouse that is in good shape except for a vertical crack down the dial. Doesn't seem to be a dial that was used on any US sets, so the odds of tracking down another original are not that great.

_________________
Tom

PM me for my email address


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Fri 15, 2007 11:06 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2348
Location: Sterling Heights, Michigan 48314, USA
Now THERE would be a lucrative radio-related hobby !! A cottage industry that could do curved glass forming and silk-screening services to boot ! That would be great.

I wonder if there are any small firing furnaces on the market that would get hot enough to sag a THIN glass blank over a form......similar to the way plastic dial covers can be made ??

_________________
.....Dennis.....
Live Long and Prosper


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Fri 15, 2007 11:12 pm 
Moderator

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 26287
Location: Detroit, MI USA
The problem is that silk screen supplies are quite expensive. If you have a dial requiring several colors, the cost of doing a single dial even if you know how is prohibitive. I looked into this several years ago as my wife's sister worked many years for a company that did screen printing. I even went there and talked to the person in charge of the dept. to get any leads on ways of possibly doing it for less. If you went ahead to make 20 or 50 identical dial glasses once you had made the screens, and sold the others to owners of similar radios, you would break even or greatly reduce your cost on the one dial glass that you needed for your own radio.

Curved glass reproduction is simple, you just take the broken piece or a template to one of the local shops that restores stained glass lamps. They make custom fit curved pieces all the time, and the price is very reasonable compared to buying the equipment and doing it at home.

_________________
Dennis

Experience is what you gain when the results aren't what you were expecting.


Last edited by Mr. Detrola on Jun Fri 15, 2007 11:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Fri 15, 2007 11:13 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 387
Location: Saskatoon,Sk.,Canada
A few years back I went to a sign place that did silk screening and got them to reproduce some addison dial glasses for me.The cost for the first one was about 100.00 and everyone after that was 10.00.I ended up having 20 dials made and eventually sold all of the ones I didn't need for 25.00 each and got all my investment back.The long and short of it is that this is one route you could take.
Jim


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 16, 2007 3:43 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 413
Location: New York City
I have been in need of a FADA 252 dial glass and cannot find a supplier. I cannot seem to locate a copy. One day I will open up that FADA 252 and try a number of those dial faces from other radios that I have stashed away.
Why do we need the dial face to be "glass?"
If we used a plastic/lucite product would the production cost be considerably cheaper than glass?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 16, 2007 4:14 am 
Member

Joined: Apr Sun 08, 2007 6:47 am
Posts: 4119
Location: British Columbia
Its not the cost of material that the dial is printed on, or even the inks, it's the cost of producing however many screens are needed to produce the dial. I investigated this with a dial used for a popular Canadian set and many others, a 1941 GE JK76. These were big dials, that are often found broken. and there were at least a half dozen GEs and RCAs built between 1941 and 46 that used exactly the same dial, so the market was there. The only reason that I didn't go ahead was that the screenprinter had a hard time locating the right types of ink for printing on glass.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 16, 2007 5:01 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2873
Location: Massachusetts
Here is a do it yourself silk screen kit (for lack of a better word)?

http://www.photoez.itcstore.com/

How this person created a clock tablet

http://www.xrestore.com/Pages/Stencil3.htm

Don't think I even want to try this, you must have lot's of patience!

Andrew


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 16, 2007 11:33 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3557
Location: Nr London, England, SS1 3PT
I looked into Photoez including e-mails to people who sold it. The problem is registration between multiple screens, a different screen for every colour is needed. Even if you can set up gun sights on each screen etc the material is not stable enough to give the registration we would need. I think if you read the product info that it actually tells you this.
I also asked suppliers if they had tried it on glass and what paints to use and how well they worked. The answer was they didn't know and I would be breaking new ground. This wouldn't have put me off but the lack of perfect registration kills it.
I remember the model shop years ago that did silk screening and those screens were stretched drum tight across the frames, the only way to get accurate registration.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 16, 2007 10:12 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Feb Thu 22, 2007 11:42 pm
Posts: 636
Location: Central Ohio
I know absolutely nothing about this seller and have never bought anything from him, but there's a guy on epay who is selling Sentinel radio glass dials that look nice:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?Vi ... &rd=1&rd=1

You might send him an email, never hurts to ask.

Chuck


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Sat 16, 2007 10:38 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 322
Location: Alexandria, VA
Thinking back, I remember in high school art class we did some silkscreening. Our teacher made the frames we used herself, and the process of screen printing even multiple colors was actually fairly easy. It's nowhere near as complicated or expensive as you might think. Unless you have a professional do it, or want to buy a bunch of high tech equipment. But when it comes down to it, a screen is a screen, and the process is identical, whether you use homemade or professional stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Mon 18, 2007 11:10 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2885
Location: Olympia WA USA
One problem of using plastic dial material vs. glass is the heat from the pilot lamps.

I have seen a lot of dials made of plastic distorted and "browned" where the pilot lite is immediately in back of the dial.

Glass typically won't melt or distort. If it does you have really got a problem! :o

_________________
FrankB
WB7ELC
"The average family has 2.5 children. Where is the other .5 child?"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Jun Wed 20, 2007 7:25 pm 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3557
Location: Nr London, England, SS1 3PT
Hello Bingster

What you did at school most likely was nothing like the accuracy needed for radio dials. I have them here that use 3 or more colours and the lettering and the background need to line up within say 0.5 mm (whats that in the thou you use? The eye can see 10 thou so its not a lot). Thats the first problem, you need super accuracy for it not to 'shout' at you, the second which may be minor is to get paints to flow perfectly on to the glass. And you wont be able to go in there with a piece of tissue and take off a bit that didn't work 'cos the other letters, which were hopefully sucessful, on a previous screen are only a flys cock away. And in a way that sums up the registration needed between screens. Dont under estimate the difficulty is what I'm saying.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: May Thu 21, 2020 8:39 am 
New Member

Joined: Jun Fri 07, 2019 10:38 am
Posts: 1
This is a pretty old post. Has anyone revisited this in the last ten years or so? You would think that someone has come up with an alternative to screen printing. Modern colour lasers, for instance? Print on plastic film and attach it to an appropriately sized piece of glass.
Even a decal might work.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: May Thu 21, 2020 10:33 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3557
Location: Nr London, England, SS1 3PT
Film to glass is used by some but isn't good enough in my opinion. Just too many optical effects. Decals don't work either: not dense enough colours, no true white and again can be seen as looking like what they are.

But Radio Daze does print to SRBP, Glass etc. Must be some sort of flat bed printer but I have never seen a picture. No service like it here. Produces very good results. They will create the artwork as well but have also printed off mine from a PDF.

This is in mine and a friends radio (they did the artwork from the original dial on this one):
https://www.radiodaze.com/marconi-561-d ... m-ds-a585/

Black, Blue and Red on SRBP

Gary


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: May Thu 21, 2020 10:43 am 
Site Admin

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 7655
Location: Baguio City, Philippines
There are specialized printers that will print on flat, rigid surfaces. There are a few consumer grade ones that can print CD surfaces. There is the additional challenge of getting the ink to print properly. CD/DVDs do that by having a special printable surface added to the label side that will accept inkjet inks.

Screen printing uses a different type/consistency of ink and can also print opaque white, something inkjet printers can't do.

Another option to directly printing onto glass is to use dry transfer printing (like Letraset rub on lettering). There are a few companies that provide this service. Expect to pay around $100-ish per copy.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: May Thu 21, 2020 11:29 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3557
Location: Nr London, England, SS1 3PT
"$100ish! doesn't seem like the way to go. Silk screen starts at £80 for one colour and £40 for each additional (price goes up with setting up for alighnment). Can have a number done for the same price....they did 10 once for me and they were beautiful.

RD cant be beat on cost particularly if they have what you want done. Pay more for having a special done and they do the artwork.

Gary


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: May Fri 22, 2020 5:44 pm 
Member

Joined: Jun Sun 15, 2014 11:04 pm
Posts: 1303
Location: Coos Bay, Oregon
If you are looking for domed round glass dial covers, here are over 100 curved glass clock face covers at this site, all different sizes, priced at $5.50 to $25:

https://timesavers.com/c-325663-clock-r ... ezels.html


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: May Sun 31, 2020 4:30 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: May Sun 10, 2020 2:55 pm
Posts: 304
Location: SW - MI
just a thought, you might ask a glass blowing person to see if they might be able to help. I do know a person that has his own kiln and also teaches. Someone like that might have some advice.

_________________
only the dead fish go with the flow


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: May Sun 31, 2020 7:58 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Dec Tue 01, 2015 5:31 am
Posts: 2815
Location: Columbus Ohio
HP and Oce make flat bed printers that print onto rigid media, without heat, uses UV curing.
These are very expensive printers, but many printshops have them and will print your job, even on glass.
Bending a printed piece may prove to be difficult using heat, and they cannot print on curved surfaces being a flatbed.
Not all shops have the white ink option, as that is a very expensive option to add.
Printers in reference, Oce' Arizona series and HP FB750
I would seek out the Oce Arizona as its white ink is very opaque, and those don't "look" for the media, the gantry just prints where directed
with media or not. The HP requires the media to be fed through it's print zone, the Oce's table is the print zone.
We have both models at our shops and use them differently depending on media.

_________________
Joe - There's no shortage of cruelty to animals: http://joinASPCA.org


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Reproducing dial glass
PostPosted: Jun Mon 01, 2020 9:34 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 3557
Location: Nr London, England, SS1 3PT
Thanks Joe

Always wondered what printers were used.
https://www.uvprinterbuyer.com/uvprinters-for-sale
New prices £100K +

So it makes Radio Daze prices seems reasonable when the outlay is so great.
Be good to find somewhere local that has the facility

Gary


Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 26 posts ]  Moderator: Peter Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Pbpix and 2 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  


































-->


Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB