Forums :: NEW! Web Resources :: Features :: Photo Gallery :: Vintage Radio Shows :: Archives
Support This Site: Contributors :: Advertise


It is currently Oct Tue 19, 2021 3:39 am


All times are UTC [ DST ]





Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Fri 27, 2021 4:02 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Sun 11, 2007 6:55 am
Posts: 11932
Location: Mission Viejo, southern California
When you strip an old lacquer finish using lacquer thinner / acetone, you find that the wood had some color, known at patina. However, you may need to make repairs with new veneer, and sand areas, plus you use grain filler. Stain is very useful for achieving a nice even tone before you start to apply lacquer. The alternative is to apply heavy costs of tinted lacquer, obscuring the patina and grain. Of course, too much or too dark stain will do much the same thing!

Here is a photo of the top of a Philco I am restoring after application of the grain filler.


Attachments:
20210820_165451.jpg
20210820_165451.jpg [ 1.19 MiB | Viewed 680 times ]

_________________
many of my radios http://s269.photobucket.com/user/FSteph ... t=3&page=1
Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Fri 27, 2021 4:47 am 
Member

Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 271
Location: Little Chute, WI
While not used originally, I always stain the veneer after stripping. The less lacquer and toner needed, the better.
My favorite is Minwax English Chestnut.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Fri 27, 2021 6:26 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Wed 19, 2012 3:34 am
Posts: 984
Location: Bethlehem, PA
FStephenMasek wrote:
When you strip an old lacquer finish using lacquer thinner / acetone, you find that the wood had some color, known at patina. However, you may need to make repairs with new veneer, and sand areas, plus you use grain filler. Stain is very useful for achieving a nice even tone before you start to apply lacquer. The alternative is to apply heavy costs of tinted lacquer, obscuring the patina and grain. Of course, too much or too dark stain will do much the same thing!

Here is a photo of the top of a Philco I am restoring after application of the grain filler.


Are you using clear or tinted/colorized grain filler?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Fri 27, 2021 1:00 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Tue 15, 2008 6:13 pm
Posts: 9517
Location: Gretna, Nebraska
The grain filler I have used for refinishing has always dried to a very light color, so I tint it.

After tinting the filled pores of the wood will look darker and more like the original finish did.

_________________
http://www.vintagerestorationservices.com
Paul
...... how hard can it be?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Fri 27, 2021 6:03 pm 
Member

Joined: Dec Fri 11, 2015 8:39 pm
Posts: 71
Location: Uniontown, OH (44685)
Hi Paul -

I was just about to experiment with tinting some grain filler when I read your post.

Are you using Timbermate grain filler? Can you elaborate a little on what you tint it with? Are you using stain to tint it or some sort of dye? I assume your process is to tint first then apply. Does the tinting alter the drying properties of the grain filler at all?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Fri 27, 2021 7:01 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Jul Tue 15, 2008 6:13 pm
Posts: 9517
Location: Gretna, Nebraska
Mark, the last filler I used was a Benjamin Moore product. It is oil based and I used a Minwax walnut stain, also oil based, to tint the filler to a darker color.
I am not sure whether it slows the dry time or not since I never have used the untinted filler or tested the dry time of it.
I usually apply the filler across the grain with plastic scraper then allow to semi dry before rubbing down with a rag.

_________________
http://www.vintagerestorationservices.com
Paul
...... how hard can it be?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Sat 28, 2021 12:07 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Sep Wed 19, 2012 3:34 am
Posts: 984
Location: Bethlehem, PA
I used to use Constantin's darkest wood grain filler. It was moderately hard to fill all the pores on some particularly open/figured grains and as an oil base (thinned with mineral spirits) which meant it would change the color of any oil based stains applied prior to the grain filling. I wouldn't call myself an expert by any means, but my original refinishing procedure used to be oil based minwax stain for coloring, followed by grain filler, followed by clear coats. This meant that if you had two different colors of stain next to each other, say for a two tone color scheme, if they used the same veneer the grain filler would end up blending the line between the two. I tried taping and found that it would weep under the tape or the tape would pull the grain filler out of the pores. I loved the product though (its since been discontinued).

Aquacoat grain filler works very well, so far I have only used clear and I plan to buy my next can in a dark tint to see how they compare. Much easier to fill all the pores in 1-4 coats. But, the product only lasts like six months after opening, cannot be allowed to freeze (so if its shipped in winter you might be SOL). Does not cause me any bleeding or blending of stains, probably because its a water base. Scentless and can be done indoors with no ventilation. I also love this product but it has its drawbacks and limitations.

In the 90s my grandfather used very thinned and DIY-tinted DAP "Plastic Wood" as grain filler (not an intended application of the product, manufacture does not advertise or recommend doing this). He had good success with it, but I was never able to get it down/learn enough about his technique to duplicate it before he passed.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Sat 28, 2021 3:10 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Sun 11, 2007 6:55 am
Posts: 11932
Location: Mission Viejo, southern California
sgath92 wrote:

Are you using clear or tinted/colorized grain filler?
I used mahogany Timbermate. It is too light. The cabinet is now stained and waiting until I have time to work on it, probably Sunday.

_________________
many of my radios http://s269.photobucket.com/user/FSteph ... t=3&page=1


Last edited by FStephenMasek on Aug Sat 28, 2021 9:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Sat 28, 2021 7:24 pm 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Apr Thu 11, 2019 8:49 pm
Posts: 227
Location: Salt Lake City, UT 84070
I'm using timbermate. I thin it, which lightens it up, so sometimes I have to tint it. I really like the water cleanup. I use both the walnut and natural. The walnut, which is very dark, fills the pores with a nice dark look, as long as I haven't thinned it too much, and looks very natural on any medium to dark veneers. Like I mentioned, I do tint my fillers if required. I use transtint liquid dyes. Remember, the filler ALWAYS goes lighter after it dries. On medium to dark wood, a dark filler ALWAYS looks better than a filler that is too light.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Why Stain Is So Useful
PostPosted: Aug Mon 30, 2021 12:05 am 
Member
User avatar

Joined: Mar Sun 11, 2007 6:55 am
Posts: 11932
Location: Mission Viejo, southern California
Here is the top with a few coats of lacquer


Attachments:
20210829_155341.jpg
20210829_155341.jpg [ 1.3 MiB | Viewed 463 times ]

_________________
many of my radios http://s269.photobucket.com/user/FSteph ... t=3&page=1
Top
 Profile  
 
Post New Topic Post Reply  [ 10 posts ]  Moderator: Peter

All times are UTC [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests



Search for:
Jump to:  


































Privacy Policy :: Powered by phpBB