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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Tue 07, 2003 9:53 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 129
Location: Silver Spring, Maryland USA
I've just acquired a console that was subjected to a varnish refinish at some point with a lacquer topcoat. Is there a chemical stripper that will work on this? I've tried Parks Pro Stripper with no success on the varnish layer. In the UK a product called Nitromors does the trick, but I can't find this stuff domestically. I hate to resort to sanding this beast (by hand, of course).<P>Any ideas, please?<P>Many thanks,<P><P>------------------<BR>73,<BR>Craig<BR>W3CRR


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Tue 07, 2003 10:04 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2007
Location: Fort Washington,MD 20744
I just finished removing several lavers of old finish with parks furniture restorer without any problem. just make sure the chemical is formulated for lacquers,shellac and varnish. also, Citristrip is supposed be a good product.<BR><P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Wed 08, 2003 1:31 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Vieques, PR, USA
There seems to be a lot of very ineffective strippers on the market these days. Some are lousy and slow even with lacquer not to mention varnish and polyurethanes. <P>You might want to go to an auto paint store and ask for MEK. Pretty brutal stuff, no waiting around, heed the warning label.<P>-Bill<P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Thu 09, 2003 9:42 pm 
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Location: Malone, New York USA
Ex!-<BR> You've given me food for thought re: using 'straight' MEK to strip those polyester- based lacquer finishes on my German radios.<P> Maybe saturate a rag/ cloth pad and cover with aluminum foil to retard evaporation?<BR> A section at a time?<P> So far, I haven't found any of the available strippers that 'budge' that stuff to any satisfactory degree.<BR> Really tedious to carefully sand to the relatively thin veneers on these sets.<BR> Ask Syl... - <IMG SRC="http://antiqueradios.com/forums/wink.gif"><P> I wonder if he tried some of his "medicine" to strip this stuff?<BR> ...Nah- He wouldn't waste "medicine" on that....<P> By jove!- I think I'll try MEK today.<BR> (Hope-hope.) We'll see.....<P> Den<P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Fri 10, 2003 1:43 am 
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Location: Charleston, W.Va.
exray has certainly hit the nail on the head here. There are many strippers currently on the market which are literally "junk". MEK, as has been suggested, will work. Sometimes a mixture of 50% lacquer thinner/50% denatured alcohol will also work. But if the underlying "varnish" is in fact polyurethane, then stripping will be difficult no matter what you use. You will have to use a full-bodied paint remover to strip polyurethane, the best I have used recently is sold in a blue-and-white can under the tradename "Dad's".<P>NOTE: In my experience, how well any stripper works is in direct proportion to its toxicity/flammability. The best ones will always be the most hazardous to use. So use good judgement and common sense. <P>------------------<BR>Poston


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Fri 10, 2003 6:22 am 
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Location: Freeport, LI, New York 11520
Dennis....<BR>BE AWFULLY CAREFUL WITH METHYL ETHYL KETONE!!This stuff can aphysixiate you if the shop is not properly ventilated. On second thought, don't even think of stripping anything with MEK unless you're outdoors.(and then stay upwind of the fumes!) Gloves and goggles are the order of the day when you use this stuff. Be careful!...Jim<P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Fri 10, 2003 9:51 am 
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Location: Malone, New York USA
Alan-<BR> Agree with methylene chloride strippers as being the best/ most aggressive on most all usual finishes on the radios, but with regard to polyester-lacquer finishes, as used on many late '50s- early '60s German units, it doesn't 'faze' it much.<P> Thanks for the concern, Jim.<BR> I'm not a 'stranger' to MEK and its hazards.<BR> -Just never thought of using it for the application mentioned, before "exray's" post.<P> -Didn't find time today to try it. Had an appointment I almost forgot. <BR> Maybe tomorrow.....<P> "I've got a great memory, it's just awfully short, nowadays." (Past MEK abuse, maybe?)- <IMG SRC="http://antiqueradios.com/forums/smile.gif"><P> Den <P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Fri 10, 2003 10:27 am 
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Location: Vieques, PR, USA
In recent months I have tried some of the 'weenie' strippers that are on the shelf here. From the same company, one bragged on the label "MEK free" and the other said it had MEK. The "MEK free" was the better product...but between the two of them there wasn't a stripper to be found.<BR>I went out the other day hunting for some more stripper and found the last can on the island...the same "MEK Free" brand. Since it was mis-priced I bought it. Used half a can of it on an old nasty R-7 Superette that had 75% of the finish already flaked off and had to do a lot of heavy scraping. Aargh...and this was the better stuff.<BR>Naw, next time its gonna be the auto paint store and hopefully they'll have real MEK in stock (they've been out of Bondo for 3 months). <BR>Stripping a cabinet needn't be a two-day affair.<P>-Bill<P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Fri 10, 2003 4:55 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Dennis,<BR> I have a few German radios like you speak of. The finish is so thick and hard I doubt if there is anything that will take it down to the veneer. To give you an idea how hard,many have shrinkage or stress cracks similiar to catalin materials.<BR> Ken<P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Fri 10, 2003 8:16 pm 
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Location: Pocasset, Cape Cod, MA
Acetone works pretty well too: it's a close relative of MEK but somewhat less toxic. You do have to cover it with polyethylene sheet or similar to keep it from evaporating.<P>MEK = methyl ethyl ketone<BR>Acetone = methyl methyl ketone<P>as I recall<P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Fri 10, 2003 10:33 pm 
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Location: Qu├ębec!
Old Radioz wrote:
<font>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dennis Daly:<BR><B> Really tedious to carefully sand to the relatively thin veneers on these sets.<BR> Ask Syl... - <IMG SRC="http://antiqueradios.com/forums/wink.gif"><P> I wonder if he tried some of his "medicine" to strip this stuff?<BR> ...Nah- He wouldn't waste "medicine" on that....<BR></B><HR>
<P>'You nutz ? Waste good stuff on a German radio ? Nah....<P>I used a Circa 1850 stripper. Yeah, I know, low boobs don't really turn me on either, but that stripper sure works on Germans...<P>Took 2 application, 3rd one to finish some forgotten spot. I've seen worse...<P>Sanding was done only to "correct" surface scratches...<P>Syl<P>------------------<BR>


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 Post subject: A good varnish remover
PostPosted: Oct Fri 10, 2003 10:48 pm 
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Location: Malone, New York USA
Hi Alan-<P> I tried acetone on that German poly-lacquer.<BR> Nah- Just dulls it. Maybe would soften it enough with time, but MEK (so far,) wins "hands down" for this particular application/ stripping problem.<BR> <BR> See my "success story" with MEK in other post.<P> Den<P>------------------<BR>


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