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 Post subject: VacuumTube Tester Seco 107 question
PostPosted: Nov Wed 18, 2020 12:44 am 
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Joined: Jul Tue 30, 2019 9:52 pm
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A friend that unfortunately is no longer with us had a Seco 107 tube tester and i can have it if i want. I have no idea about tube testers and know very little about tubes, i am restoring radios, doing some simple tasks like recapping cleaning etc. But it would be useful if i could measure my tubes and know their condition, so my question is if this tester is able to measure all the kinds of tubes or it is for some particular types, and how easy is to use if you follow instructions etc


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 Post subject: Re: VacuumTube Tester Seco 107 question
PostPosted: Nov Wed 18, 2020 1:30 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Rochester NY USA
It's fairly easy to use. For those tubes listed on the left panel, set heater and load controls and test (two tests for some). Leakage test is very sensitive. I've found that it correlates with other testers on some tubes, not so well on others. It can do emission tests on other tubes, a few more steps.

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 Post subject: Re: VacuumTube Tester Seco 107 question
PostPosted: Nov Wed 18, 2020 5:26 am 
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Joined: Oct Thu 04, 2018 2:11 pm
Posts: 470
Location: Suburban Chicago
The rapid tester section on the left/in the lid is a Jackson-style dynamic emissions tester. The Jacksons have a good reputation, Seco is a lesser light but not necessarily bad. For tubes that are not included on the left panel the main panel on the right is a traditional simple emissions tester and there is test data for a lot of the tubes that fit its socket. Older 4, 5, 6, and 7 pin sockets are not included so depending on the era of the radios you restore that could be an issue.

The reason I have one and the reason you might want to have one is that the shorts/leakage/gas/grid emissions tester works on both panels and it uses a magic eye tube as the indicator. Personally I think having this tester is worth it for the cool factor of the eye tube alone but you might not be as enamored of them as I am. Back in the day the eye test on this tester and some similar ones was considered too sensitive by tube manufacturers so you might not want to throw out tubes that fail this test only marginally.

The bottom line is that if you only test 7/9 pin miniature and octal/loctal tubes this could be your only tester if its marginal reputation doesn't put you off. If your tastes in tubes are broader than that and or you want a well regarded tester you will need to have another one too. For me the magic eye makes it a keeper.

By now I have a small collection of testers and I plan to run the same set of tubes through all of them over the coming weeks to get some numbers to make comparisons with. In my brief testing the Seco 107 seems to give numbers similar to my other testers but this experiment should be a more rigorous comparison.


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 Post subject: Re: VacuumTube Tester Seco 107 question
PostPosted: Nov Sun 22, 2020 3:09 am 
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Joined: Nov Fri 04, 2011 3:12 am
Posts: 1046
Location: Parksley, VA.
The Seco 107 is very sensitive to leakage. A big deal back when UHF television was frequently used.

If you open it up, you will find the wiring is a very lightweight copper wire. I know, I have one. The power transformer is small so it cannot produce a lot of current for tubes which require significant filament draw.

Bottom line- If you are a ham radio licensee with a vacuum tube linear or audiophile or rebuild high powered guitar amplifiers and need a tester for high powered tubes, the Seco is not going to suffice. If you are using it for weeding out tubes with interelement leakage or bad filaments, then this will work. PLEASE NOTE-- Many "weak" tubes in radios and certain television applications will work just fine.

No tube testers will answer all questions about tubes. No tube tester can stress a tube like many circuits can. All a tube tester can do is potentially point out a failure IF the design of the tester focuses on that particular point. Yes, all testers can point out an open filament. Past that point, a lot of testers will pass a tube as good which will not work in a given radio. Or fail a tube which will work. If the tube has no emission, it is done. If it has some you may find it will still work in some situations.

Tube testers are like any other piece of test equipment. Some have a few strengths, some have many strengths. All have weaknesses. Learn what you can about your equipment and this will keep you from being mislead about testing results.

John S.


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