Need Help with some Unusual Tubes

Discussions of tubes, transformers, capacitors, and other discrete parts of radios, radio restoration and repair services. Ads are not permitted.
Post Reply
Hotwire
Member
453
Jan Thu 01, 1970 12:00 am
Riverton, UT

Need Help with some Unusual Tubes

Post by Hotwire »

I was given a box of tubes, many of them very large and foreign to me. I'm trying to figure out if they are worth anything and what to do with them. I suspect a lot of them are transmitting and milatary tubes. These are the designations I have:
828
866A
CX-380
VT-101
VT-286
1625
T-55
811-A
4-125A
VT-191
GL-866-A
803
R.E.L. 64 is a really strange looking tube.
The great arrogance of the present is to forget the intelligence of the past
easyrider8
Member
10748
Jan Thu 01, 1970 12:00 am

Post by easyrider8 »

You have some nice tubes there. Check Ebay to see what they sell for and put them in the classifieds. Watch out for the bottom feeders that will e-mail you and try to get them for nothing.

Dave
Norm Leal
Silent Key
30905
Jan Thu 01, 1970 12:00 am
Livermore, CA

Post by Norm Leal »

Hi

VT 101 is 837, transmitting
VT 286 is 832A, transmitting
VT191 is 316A, UHF transmitting

As mentioned most are transmitting. The 866's (mercury vapor) and 380 are rectifiers.

Don't know about REL 64 although there is a 64 photo tube.
Norm
genoo
Silent Key
1463
Sep Sat 15, 2007 9:12 pm
Contact:

Post by genoo »

The 4-125A is a transmitting tube. I got some from a AM station once, and they did quite well on evil bay.

Gene
'The only thing constant is change'.
Member: TCA
http://www.genekidd.com" -="window.open(this.href);return false;
Chris108
Member
14354
Jun Fri 19, 2009 5:34 pm
Floral Park, New York

Post by Chris108 »

1625 is a filament type transmitting tube, used by the millions in WW-2 aircraft and mobile equipment which operated on DC (battery) power. Not of great value due to the huge volume that were made, but sought after by military radio collectors.

T-55 (Taylor 55) is very collectible--also sought after by audio enthusiasts.

803 is a big RF tube with a graphite anode. Was used in some larger WW-2 military transmitters, numerous ham projects, and is of interest to audio enthusiasts.

811A is a good RF power tube, used in the Collins 30L-1 amplifier, lots of ham projects, some ultrasonic cleaners, and sought after by audio enthusiasts.

REL-64 is a TR tube (transmit-receive) tube for a radar system. Essentially a refined version of a lightning arrester, it is designed to break down and short out the input to the receiver section while the transmitter is in operation. The small cap at the top is for the "keep alive" electrode. This pre-biases the gas in the tube to speed up its action.
"Hell, there are no rules here--we're trying to accomplish something!"

Thomas A. Edison
User avatar
Jon the Grimm
Member
396
Apr Mon 26, 2010 11:02 pm
Milwaukee,Wi

Post by Jon the Grimm »

Your thinking of the 1624. The 1625 is simply a 12 volt 807 with a large 7-pin base. They are also not of great monetary value.
Last edited by Jon the Grimm on Mar Sat 12, 2011 12:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
GordonW
Member
558
Dec Wed 05, 2007 10:08 pm
Contact:

Post by GordonW »

828 is a medium-size transmitting pentode. Usually used in modulator sections. 80 watt plates! A pair is capable of up to 385 watts in PP, audio amp.

These were frequently used as modulator driver tubes, in big radio transmitters. A pair of 828s might drive a pair of 889s or such, in the modulator of a 20-kilowatt AM radio station transmitter, for example.

Regards,
Gordon.
"It's the guys who think that attending meetings is real day's work that are the problem."- HepcatWilly (on AudioKarma)
User avatar
BigBandsMan
Silent Key
5813
Jan Thu 01, 1970 12:00 am

Post by BigBandsMan »

You were given all these? :shock:

Good heavens! Congratulations! I wish I could get that lucky. You must be living right :wink:.

Larry
It don't make a go if it ain't got that GLOW!
User avatar
35Z5
Member
13080
Jan Thu 01, 1970 12:00 am
Carrsville, VA

Post by 35Z5 »

Jon the Grimm wrote:Your thinking of the 1624. The 1625 is simply a 12 volt 807 with a large 7-pin base. They are also not of great monetary value.
That's because I have a couple... :cry:

Tom
tubenutt
Member
1527
Jan Thu 01, 1970 12:00 am

Post by tubenutt »

So do I. Darn things are ~worthless now. Even though they are of the 6L6 family in a seven-pin (6A7) base. MANY comm rigs had them PPP sometimes. They were a real workhorse for the WWII-era Military, but now they're CHEAP!
Last edited by tubenutt on Mar Sat 12, 2011 4:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
Steve McDonald
Norm Leal
Silent Key
30905
Jan Thu 01, 1970 12:00 am
Livermore, CA

Post by Norm Leal »

Many of us have 1625's. Not bad if you have large 7 pin sockets and 12 volts for the filament. They are as good as 807, 6BG6, 6L6 and other power tubes.
Norm
radiotechnician
Silent Key
12437
Sep Thu 23, 2010 5:37 am

Post by radiotechnician »

Somewhere in the past I recall 1625s were sought because you could take the base off and seperate the wire for the 'supressor'
and tie it to the screen and grid to make a triode for a grounded grid linear, which was great when they were selling for about 75 cents each as surplus.
de
VE7ASO VE7ZSO
Amateur Radio Literacy Club. May we help you read better.
Steve Dow
ve7aso@rac.ca
User avatar
Mikeinkcmo
Member
8962
Oct Sun 15, 2006 11:57 am
Liberty, MO 64068

Post by Mikeinkcmo »

When you are looking for tube info, you can go here or here to find subs or RCA HB-3 data. There is also a good VT to Commercial tube list here, and here you'll will find a laundry list of tube data links that will cover just about any tube made.

Have fun.
Pics, Bold & underlined text, are usually links.

https://mikeharrison.smugmug.com/

Mike
Bugman
Member
4910
Mar Sat 14, 2009 4:56 pm
Winchester, VA, 22602

Post by Bugman »

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the CX-380 so far. If it's functional, it can bring a pretty penny on Ebay, particularly if sold to Asia. The globe 80's are desirable for the early radios.
Burnt Fingers
Member
11481
Oct Sat 20, 2007 2:36 am

Post by Burnt Fingers »

Somewhere in the past I recall 1625s were sought because you could take the base off and seperate the wire for the 'supressor'
and tie it to the screen and grid to make a triode for a grounded grid linear, which was great when they were selling for about 75 cents each as surplus
That only worked with a few brands that brought the suppressor thru the envelope and ran it and the cathode wires and into the pin. I still have a few modified 1625's from a long gone linear I built.

P&H Electronics sold a 4 tube version and you could order it with either 837's or modified 1625's, or supply your own tubes.

Carl
dkjones96
Member
1172
Jun Tue 02, 2009 2:38 am

Post by dkjones96 »

The 866's make for a pretty rectifier assembly.
-Kyle
You must be register and login to post a reply.
Post Reply