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 Post subject: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Thu 06, 2014 11:49 am 
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Joined: Feb Thu 06, 2014 11:42 am
Posts: 14
New to this great forum. Can anyone direct me where I can get a new idler wheel for my old Garrard turntable. Sorry about the model number as the turntable is burried in a closet. My father bought this in the early 60's.


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Thu 06, 2014 1:58 pm 
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Joined: Jun Fri 15, 2012 2:22 pm
Posts: 133
Location: Wausau, WI
I would start here.

http://www.thevoiceofmusic.com/catalog/ ... urrets.asp


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Fri 07, 2014 9:26 pm 
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Joined: Oct Sat 15, 2011 12:19 am
Posts: 2148
Location: 23452
just curious, how did you determine that you need a new wheel?

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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Fri 07, 2014 10:31 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 22, 2009 1:22 am
Posts: 379
Location: Mpls
I'm with Cl350rr here as well. I have resurrected several old Garrards, and have a fondness for them. But they do after a few decades develop a bunch of issues that you need to address before you spring for an idler (you may not need to), so I am curious what you have done with it or observed. My two areas of attention first go to the amber death glue (old Garrard lube is horrible cement when it dries) and the motor spindle lube. What sometime seems like a dried up idler is just a glazed over edge fighting a gummed up motor or mechanics. Good luck either way - they do clean up nice!


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Sat 08, 2014 3:09 pm 
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Joined: Apr Thu 28, 2011 5:48 pm
Posts: 265
Location: Northeast PA
I have two and love them, especially the Type A. Both needed full cleaning overhauls and new tires. Where the Garrard grease turns to tar, the rubber seems to dryrot and disintegrate. Personally, I'd put new tires on it, too. Cheap insurance.


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Sat 08, 2014 3:29 pm 
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Location: 23452
unless the wheel is cracked or flat spotted, I would not replace it until a complete lube and adjustment has been done, including checking to see that the wheel surface is making full contact with each step on the motor shaft.

the rubber bushings that suspend the motor have a lot of weight on them. over time the rubber compresses and takes on a permanent set holding the motor in a lower position than designed. when this happens, the idler wheel may align with the contact surface partially off the motor shaft step and reduce the friction between the two. it does not take much reduction in friction to stop the auto mechanism from working or cause variations in platter speed. realignment can be done by shimming the motor mounts with washers or small O rings. (a whole lot cheaper than buying a replacement wheel which is probably as old as the one you are removing).

If, after everything else is working smoothly and everything is lubed and aligned, the wheel continues to give trouble, then look for a replacement.

$.02

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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Sat 08, 2014 7:07 pm 
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Joined: Feb Thu 06, 2014 11:42 am
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The rubber is hardened and has lost its grip.


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Sat 08, 2014 7:27 pm 
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Joined: Apr Thu 28, 2011 5:48 pm
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Location: Northeast PA
As would any 50 year-old tire. Would anyone drive a '64 Corvette with the original tires?


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Sat 08, 2014 7:32 pm 
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my 210 (1959) has the original tire, sat in storage for years without turning, rubber is rather hard but then they were originally. it turns without a problem, records sound great. it's not as though anyone's life is depending on a turntable idler

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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Sat 08, 2014 7:44 pm 
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Joined: Apr Thu 28, 2011 5:48 pm
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Location: Northeast PA
You are very fortunate. I was not so lucky myself.


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Sat 08, 2014 7:49 pm 
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i just don't like buying parts unless they are needed. chances are the rubber on the replacement wheel is going to be as hard or harder than the one you have. If you can get the existing one working properly, why spend the money?

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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Sat 08, 2014 7:58 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 2684
Location: Haledon NJ USA
How long an idler wheel lasts depends on where it was stored, and the quality of the rubber. My 1956 Webcor Musical Coronet still has it's original idler rubber and it's just fine, and I'm blessed (cursed?) with a good ear. If it slipped or thumped, I'd send the wheel out for rebuilding immediately.

Ken D.


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Mon 10, 2014 6:09 pm 
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Joined: May Sat 06, 2006 4:03 am
Posts: 3571
Location: ZIP 23831 South of Richmond, VA 25 miles down the pike.
So you know the wheel is harden means you now know the model number of your Garrard? What is it? Depends on your wheel you might can fix it. If all rubber is hard chuck it and get the best deal you can. But if only the contact surface has a glaze look to it try this. Use a long screw, pass thru the hole, secure with nuts, prevent wheel from turning, place end of screw in drill, get some emery cloth or sandpaper, and run your drill and hold the wheel against sandpaper, evenly remove glaze until you get softer surface.
Bill J.


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Wed 19, 2014 3:27 pm 
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Joined: Feb Thu 06, 2014 11:42 am
Posts: 14
Sorry for the delay. The model number is an AT-6.


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Wed 19, 2014 6:09 pm 
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Joined: May Sat 06, 2006 4:03 am
Posts: 3571
Location: ZIP 23831 South of Richmond, VA 25 miles down the pike.
Deacon, here's a link to SAMS 638-7 data for the AT-6. That's a good changer. I think the cartridge is more expensive than in recent past but so is everything else.
Bill J.

https://app.box.com/s/ictyoquyffoqma4g1fdc


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Thu 20, 2014 11:55 am 
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Joined: Feb Thu 06, 2014 11:42 am
Posts: 14
Thanks Bill for the information.


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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Thu 20, 2014 4:52 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 4127
Location: Berkley, Michigan
I have a '67 Sylvania that uses a similar Garrard. The Idler was smooth and round but hardened and lost its grip. The turntable would stall in mid cycle. Not only did the rebuilt idler restore the torque, it reduced the motor noise transmitted from the motor pulley to the turntable rim. I never regretted replacing it.

Image

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 Post subject: Re: Garrard Turntable
PostPosted: Feb Fri 28, 2014 6:30 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 146
Location: Westminster, CO, USA
Greetings!

I've had surprisingly good success reviving the rubber of old idler wheels using DOT-4 brake fluid. Give the rubber a generous coating of the brake fluid, and then let it soak in overnight. Next day, clean the excess off of the rubber using something mild like Windex, which I've used successfully over the years without seeing any harm come to the rubber.

After doing this, both my Dual 1209 and Garrard AT-6 run like new.

Good luck!


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