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 Post subject: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Sat 18, 2019 10:22 pm 
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Joined: Mar Fri 11, 2016 9:20 pm
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Hey guys. I just got ahold of a Westinghouse RCA CTC-15 clone and I'd like to try to restore it. I've done several tube radios and amps but never a TV. I'd like to do my homework first though and wanted to ask if there is a source of schematics like "nostalgiaair" for televisions. I would also like to know if there is some good reading material that'll teach me how to diagnose problems and use proper safety procedures. I've got an oscilloscope and am planning on getting a crt tester and degaussing wand as they're pretty cheap. I'd also like an NTSC generator but those things are pretty pricey... Is there some sort of "good enough" device out there that I'm not aware of? This may or may not be the last TV I'll work on and I don't want to spend a ton of money of diagnostic equipment. Anyway, I appreciate any help that you guys can give.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Sun 19, 2019 12:09 am 
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Location: Durham, NC
Welcome to the Forum. It's a good place to ask and receive good advice.

A color TV is a pretty complicated beastie -- several times more complicated, and a lot more dangerous, than almost any tube radio. Good that you're looking for background material before you start. Others with more hands-on experience than me will likely chime in with great suggestions, but I'll lead off with what little I know.

The Early Television Foundation https://www.earlytelevision.org/ has about as many TV schematics as you're likely to find on the internet. The particular page you'll want is https://www.earlytelevision.org/tv_sche ... color.html

General TV service information can be found in books by Grob (Basic Television Principles and Servicing), color servicing by Buchsbaum (Color TV Servicing), and others. There are even complete courses available. You don't need anything newer than the '70s for that CTC-15 clone or most other tube sets, so these books are available for less than $25, if they're not in your local library (which, given their age, they may no longer be).

Eventually you'll need an NTSC signal source, but for most purposes folks use a DVD player and video reference/test disk, plus an RF modulator. For color convergence there are lots of simple color dot-bar generators from the days of CRT television, some with RF outputs as well as video. I got a working B&K Precision model 1211A at a recent Hamfest for $15. But of course you can spend a lot more, if you think you'll do more TV restorations.

Good luck!

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Mark Nelson
A collector of TV signal boosters and UHF converters -- God help me!
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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Sun 19, 2019 1:34 am 
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Location: Dallas, TX
Phil Nelson has several color TV restoration stories on his website.
https://www.antiqueradio.org/restoration.htm

I would try a Black and White TV first however. Maybe something from approximately the same era
as the color one. Lots of capacitors to replace as well as resistors.
If the Early TV Foundation doesn't have the info there is always SAMS.

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Tim
It's not the Destination, It's the Journey.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Sun 19, 2019 2:48 am 
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Joined: Mar Fri 11, 2016 9:20 pm
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I found an 18 page service manual for the original ctc-15 so ill compare with my set and go with that if possible. I was hoping to find a B&W set but this is what presented itself. The market around here for stuff like this is ridiculous. I had to drive 1.5 hours one way to get this one and it was the only old tube set I could find on Craigslist "locally." I've been watching videos on YouTube of shango006's and he restores a couple of ctc-15 clones. He has a very minimalist approach to restoring sets, stating that it's better to diagnose problems than to do bulk recapping. I get that, but frankly I have no problem with swapping out every resistor and capacitor in the set if need be. I just want it to work. Not saying I'm going to do that, but I'm willing to. I understand what he's trying to do though. I'll keep my eyes open though. Maybe a B&W set will present itself. 22kv is nothing to monkey with. Just want to do it right and be safe in the process. I have the cataract to fix as well and I'm sure that'll be fun. Otherwise it's in pretty good shape and looks delightfully retro. It'll probably be months before I actually start working on it. Maybe longer. The Wizard of Oz will be the first thing we watch if I can get it working and I can't wait.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Sun 19, 2019 4:10 am 
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Joined: Mar Fri 11, 2016 9:20 pm
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This is it BTW. And that's my chihuahua, Stormy.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Sun 19, 2019 10:17 pm 
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Joined: Aug Thu 12, 2010 6:25 pm
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Location: Durham, NC
JasonWatkins wrote:
... I was hoping to find a B&W set but this is what presented itself. The market around here for stuff like this is ridiculous. I had to drive 1.5 hours one way to get this one and it was the only old tube set I could find on Craigslist "locally." ...


I feel your pain. Here in central North Carolina there seems to be almost no old-electronics, never mind old-TV, collecting activity. When I lived in the Boston MA area there was interesting stuff on Craigslist nearly every day, and at good prices. Sigh -- the price one pays for trading heat and humidity for snow shovelling in retirement.

BTW, Jason, where are you located?

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Mark Nelson
A collector of TV signal boosters and UHF converters -- God help me!
tv-boxes.com


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Sun 19, 2019 10:29 pm 
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Joined: Mar Fri 11, 2016 9:20 pm
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Yep. And I watch several YouTube channels where they go "thrifting" and they almost always come away with something cool. Nope. Not here. I've gone to every thrift store in town several times just to find nothing even remotely interesting. Bummer. I live in Cleveland, TN. Greater Chattanooga metropolitan area.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Mon 20, 2019 9:44 pm 
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I worked on lots of those sets, and their "clones", in the old days. First of all, get the CRT tested. A replacement won't be difficult to find, but you need to know where you are. Some service hints:

1. Check the flyback transformer for signs of overheating or corrosion.

2. The power supply in those sets is a voltage doubler, and the big capacitors often fail.

3. Check the wiring and components around the 6CG7/6FQ7 driver tubes for heat damage and corrosion. Another place to check is the wiring around the big B+ dropping resistor.

4. The 6EW6, 6EA8/6GH8, and 6JU8 tubes were run pretty hard. It's likely that one or more will check bad.

If the set has not been run in a long time, the electrolytic capacitors may need replacement.

I will probably think of more, but this will get you started.

A good book to read on tube-type color TV is "Color TV Training Manual" by Oliphant and Ray (Sams). It covers theory on 1954-66 color sets.

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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Tue 21, 2019 4:36 am 
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Joined: May Thu 14, 2015 4:15 pm
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Location: Dallas, TX
The main reason I suggested doing a B/W set first is that going from radios to a color TV is a BIG jump. If you get familiar with B/W circuits first it is a good half way point. Color sets require additional test equipment on top of the equipment required for B/W. Keep in mind that TV repair information of the same era as the TV is not the same as current restore information which takes part aging into acount. Where are you located?

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Tim
It's not the Destination, It's the Journey.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Tue 21, 2019 11:56 pm 
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Speaking of Bernard Grob's book, in the 1954 issue it is noted at the beginning:

Quote:
The McGraw-Hill text-film series Basic Television—Principles and Servicing (six 16mm motion-picture films) is closely correlated with this text, as follows: The Television System is correlated with Chaps. 1 to 5, Antenna Installation, with Chap. 21; Television Receivers, with Chap. 8; Localizing Troubles, with Chap. 8; Deflection Circuits, with Chap. 18; and Practical TV Alignment, with Chaps. 19 and 23. There is also a series of six 35mm follow-up filmstrips with captions in the form of questions. These films and filmstrips are available from the Text-Film Department of the McGraw-Hill Book Company.


I suppose those videos are long lost at this point? I can't find a single reference online to them but it'd be really neat to have a visual companion to the text. I'd actually love to see any era-specific videos on TV repair. I know there are some good restore videos and series on YouTube but most everything I've seen assumes a lot of knowledge on the topic already and aren't really educational guides. (I'm more of a visual learner in general).


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Wed 22, 2019 10:05 am 
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Joined: Nov Sun 11, 2018 12:32 am
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All the books mentioned here are great, but I stumbled across another one that, for me anyway, was more accessible and only cause my eyes to glaze over in a couple of places. It's called Monochrome and Color Television by R. R. Gulati. It's a combination of theory and then a detailed walk-through of each section, both on the transmission and reception side.

I have the PDF if you want it.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading Material for a newbie
PostPosted: May Thu 23, 2019 1:58 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Beaver Falls, PA. USA
An excellent book on B&W television is "Television Simplified" by Milton Kiver, which went through several editions in the 1940s and 1950s. Another one is the Photofact Television Course. These books will tell you how the circuits work; you'll need to understand how B&W works before tackling color.

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