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 Post subject: Grafittied Philco Safari TV
PostPosted: Jun Sun 16, 2019 12:38 pm 
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Joined: Feb Thu 17, 2011 11:27 pm
Posts: 12653
Location: Long Island, N.Y.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Philco ... SwKN1dBQVF
This looked like such pretty well cared for set, but what in the world possessed the owner to write all over the front of it?! Now I know why it hasn't been sold or bid made on it. A shame.


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 Post subject: Re: Grafittied Philco Safari TV
PostPosted: Jun Mon 17, 2019 3:14 pm 
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Joined: Apr Thu 16, 2015 11:04 pm
Posts: 438
Location: Sacramento, California
Looks like somebody's name and address. Every so often a radio (usually) will turn up with the original owner's name and sometimes address written on it. I once had a 1950s RCA Victor tube portable that the original owner had written his name and address on the back with Liquid Paper of all things. When he moved from Los Angeles to Sacramento, he covered up the L.A. address with clear shipping tape and wrote his new address on the tape. I also had a Motorola transistor set that had a name and address on the inside label.

I have also seen a National HRO-500 where the owner had engraved his callsign and Social Security number on the front faceplate. For a time in the 60s and 70s, law enforcement was telling people to engrave identifying info in prominent places on everything significant they owned due to sky high burglary rates likely caused by high demand for illicit narcotic drugs. I have a mantel clock from the early 80s that was originally owned by my grandfather, who engraved his CA driver license number on the top of it. (California issues DL numbers for life, so they were popular ID markings during that time period.) Grandpa also engraved all his tools (he was a mechanic and woodworker) with a special mark.


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 Post subject: Re: Grafittied Philco Safari TV
PostPosted: Jun Mon 17, 2019 10:04 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 1715
Location: Long Beach, CA USA
My mom ruined a bunch of our stuff in the 70s when she borrowed an engraver and cut her SS # into any item she thought a burglar might nab. Can you imagine the authorities suggesting such a thing today?


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 Post subject: Re: Grafittied Philco Safari TV
PostPosted: Jun Mon 17, 2019 10:20 pm 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 32369
Location: SoCal, 91387
BakeliteManCA wrote:
For a time in the 60s and 70s, law enforcement was telling people to engrave identifying info in prominent places on everything significant they owned due to sky high burglary rates

I remember that; name, and either SS or DL number.

I have a Regency TR-1 in Mahogany where the original owner scratched his name and SS number into it. At least he did it on the bottom of the case.

_________________
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 Post subject: Re: Grafittied Philco Safari TV
PostPosted: Jun Tue 18, 2019 3:24 am 
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Joined: Apr Thu 16, 2015 11:04 pm
Posts: 438
Location: Sacramento, California
I actually have Grandpa's engraver, found in his house after he and his wife passed on (she in 2006, he in 2009). It's really really old-it appears to possibly be pre WW2-and the power cord was soldered in by him. Sadly it's in storage and not handy for a pic. My dad's engraver is buried somewhere in his shop (mom still lives in the house). Engraving was the hot thing in the 70s, the cause being concern about burglaries by people desperate for a fix. The WW2 generation was flummoxed by the whole idea of people addicted to drugs to the point where they were stealing anything not nailed down to sell, in their youth they were happy if they had more than one meal a day-nobody really had any concern for anything like drugs, they were too hungry. The whole back to the land movement of the time may have been partially spurred by nervous speculation by "war brides" that the libertinism of the era resembled the Weimar years in Germany. Fortunately, we wound up with Ronald Reagan instead, but it could have been a lot worse.


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