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 Post subject: Freed-Eisemann FM-42
PostPosted: Feb Tue 08, 2011 3:59 am 
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Joined: Dec Wed 31, 2008 4:28 am
Posts: 478
Location: Dallas, Georgia
Hi All,
Thought I'd share some pictures of the radio I'm currently working on.
http://i1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee4 ... nnFM42.jpg
http://i1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee4 ... FM42-1.jpg
http://i1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee4 ... FM42-2.jpg
http://i1230.photobucket.com/albums/ee4 ... FM42-3.jpg

The tabletop version is the FM 40, and is also posted in the photo gallery.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Tue 08, 2011 7:42 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
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Location: Albuquerque, NM 87123
Could we have some larger pictures please?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Tue 08, 2011 7:49 am 
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Joined: Dec Wed 31, 2008 4:28 am
Posts: 478
Location: Dallas, Georgia
That's the original size of the pictures. I don't know how to enlarge them. Sorry

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Tue 08, 2011 11:57 am 
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Joined: Jan Mon 18, 2010 2:13 am
Posts: 19862
Location: Dayton Ohio
Very nice radio, with prewar FM! I have been looking for one of those, but ended up with a similar model, the FM-69.

Image

I had the FM working with my converter, but the local oscillator has problems of dropping out when the radio warms up, so I need to get back into it and find the faulty component. It didn't do this on the bench, but it was probably getting better ventilation there :wink:

Good luck with your Freed! Its a great radio!

Oh, unfortunately... mine is missing the changerl :(

-Steve


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Tue 08, 2011 6:05 pm 
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Joined: Jul Wed 07, 2010 4:21 am
Posts: 298
Location: columbia mo
There's a description of the Freed-Eisemann FM line in the May 1941 issue of "FM" Magazine [pp 14-15].

Two table models were offered -- the AC-only model 51 [14 tubes] and the AC/DC Model 40 [14 tubes]. As was the case with the entire F-I line, the AM and FM RF and IF sections are separate. DC was important because many areas of the firm's home market -- New York City -- were DC-only areas, c/o the Consolidated Edison utility.

Then, an assortment of consoles.

The AC Model FM-61 [AC only] and Model FM-54 [AC-DC] use the same chassis as the respective table models.

Automatic combinations included the Hepplewhite AC model-52 and the AC-DC model FM-42 [16 tubes] which were also available with a third band for short waves, models 52X and 42X respectively. Include a 12-inch speaker and additional tweeter. Includes Garrard changer

Then the modernistic AM model-53 and AC-DC model 43; same features and specs as above.

Finally the automatic Chippendale AC model FM-55 [18 tubes] and AC-DC model FM-45 [20 tubes], 12 inch speaker + tweeter.

The Freed-Eisemann plant was at 39 West 19th Street on lower west side of Manhattan in an area known as Chelsea.

Tragedy struck the firm, April 19, 1941 when Joseph D.R. Freed died at his home, 3901 Henry Hudson Parkway, NYC.

From 'FM' Magazine [May 1941, p. 43]-- "...At the age of 43, he was well started toward a second success in radio, as president of the Freed Radio Corporation. Recently joined by his brother Arthur, the old team of Freed-Eisemann days and neutrodyne receivers was in full swing on the production of A-FM sets...

Last year having negotiated an Armstrong FM license, he organized the Freed Radio Corporation, with offices and factory at 39 West 19th St, New York City, and started production of a line comprised entirely of A-FM sets. Now, with distribution well organized in cities where FM programs are on the air, and aided by public acceptance which still attaches to the Freed-Eisemann name, Arthur Freed will direct the business of the company."

Civilian production ceased in early 1942 because of the War but in 1946-7, Freed Eisemann produced a limited number of consoles housing an elaborate chrome-plated AM-FM chassis with a separate FM dial calibrated in both megacycles and channel numbers above the main scale.

The only other Freed-Eisemann FM unit I've come across is a component-style AM-FM tuner of rather average design and performance bearing 1954 date codes.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Wed 09, 2011 12:56 am 
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Joined: Jan Thu 01, 1970 1:00 am
Posts: 5076
Location: Ortonville, Michigan
Freed-Eisemann built some very impressive creations. Not many were covered in Rider, so if you should be restoring one of their sets, you simply have to follow conventional practice of replacing components.

I have one of the table sets, that must be the ones spoken of here. It's in wonderful shape (FM 40, I believe). I re-capped it some years ago, and it's one killer set. It has phenomenal sound, but unfortunately the prewar FM band. For a table set, it weighs a ton.

Then, I was able to get one of the classroom FM-AM sets, in decent condition. Hardly a handsome table set, and very spartan in appearance. Again, it wasn't in Rider or anyplace else. I re-capped it,and was able to find the exact silver grille cloth for it. The thing has a single end 6L6 power amp, which is most unusual. It's a hot set on both bands, and sounds like a million bucks.

For several decadesa, I've had an early postwar Freed-Eisemann console, with AM B'cast and both FM bands. It has a Jensen coax speaker, with a separate power amplifier, using P-P 6L6 power amps. The receiver chassis is built like military equipment.

I just have to say that freed-Eisemann was purely a class act, in all respects.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Fri 11, 2011 4:46 pm 
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Joined: Sep Wed 29, 2010 4:26 am
Posts: 8
doug houston wrote:
Freed-Eisemann built some very impressive creations. Not many were covered in Rider, so if you should be restoring one of their sets, you simply have to follow conventional practice of replacing components.

I have one of the table sets, that must be the ones spoken of here. It's in wonderful shape (FM 40, I believe). I re-capped it some years ago, and it's one killer set. It has phenomenal sound, but unfortunately the prewar FM band. For a table set, it weighs a ton.

Then, I was able to get one of the classroom FM-AM sets, in decent condition. Hardly a handsome table set, and very spartan in appearance. Again, it wasn't in Rider or anyplace else. I re-capped it,and was able to find the exact silver grille cloth for it. The thing has a single end 6L6 power amp, which is most unusual. It's a hot set on both bands, and sounds like a million bucks.

For several decadesa, I've had an early postwar Freed-Eisemann console, with AM B'cast and both FM bands. It has a Jensen coax speaker, with a separate power amplifier, using P-P 6L6 power amps. The receiver chassis is built like military equipment.

I just have to say that freed-Eisemann was purely a class act, in all respects.


Hi, long time lurker. Just started to collect and restore last year but I saw this and had to ask about an FM-40 (one more to restore) that we inherited from my wife's mom. I saw from the Rider's schematic that it shows a 6E5 (IIR) eyetube but the radio does not have it. Was that an option that was used on the console version or just a different version of the set?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Sat 12, 2011 12:27 am 
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Joined: Jan Mon 18, 2010 2:13 am
Posts: 19862
Location: Dayton Ohio
Hi Gerry,

Yes, it is possible they left the eye tube off the table model because (if I recall correctly) the speaker is between the two vertical dials.
I'm not home right now to look it up, but i remember seeing a picture of the FM-40 in J.W.F. Puett's "Worlds Largest Radios".

A collector near me has an FM-42, but I've given up hope that I could buy or trade it off of him :(

-Steve


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Feb Sun 13, 2011 5:03 am 
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Joined: Dec Wed 31, 2008 4:28 am
Posts: 478
Location: Dallas, Georgia
After all these comments, I have to tell ya that I'm only working on this radio; I don't own it. I met the owner at a wedding we were both attending, and he told me he had it but didn't know anything about it. He said he bought it a little more than a dozen years ago and paid less than $100.00 for it. The cabinet has very few marks in it and the inside was quite clean for being seventy years old. The Garrard turntable is very impressive. Yes, I have to keep a towel handy every time I'm near it.

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I may not know much, but what I do know is absolutely uncertain! And I am unanimous about that!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mar Sat 19, 2011 3:17 am 
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Joined: Dec Wed 31, 2008 4:28 am
Posts: 478
Location: Dallas, Georgia
Well, it's been a while since I started on it, but I'd like to announce that I took the chassis back today and hooked it all up - and it worked great. He even has the original long wire antenna, so we stretched it out its full length to a window and got very good AM reception. The turntable works, but we need to put the pins back on the wire that runs from the tone arm to the chassis. Now if I can get my own radio working...

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I may not know much, but what I do know is absolutely uncertain! And I am unanimous about that!


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